Articles tagged as "Biomedical interventions and prevention tools"

Mixed methods in biomedical intervention trials yield rich data – the VOICE-D qualitative study

How presentation of drug detection results changed reports of product adherence in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

Musara P, Montgomery ET, Mgodi NM, Woeber K, Akello CA, Hartmann M, Cheng H, Levy L, Katz A, Grossman CI, Chirenje ZM, van der Straten A, Mensch B. AIDS Behav. 2017 Jan 21. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1685-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Accurate estimates of study product use are critical to understanding and addressing adherence challenges in HIV prevention trials. The VOICE trial exposed a significant gap between self-reported adherence and drug detection. The VOICE-D qualitative study was designed to better understand non-adherence during VOICE, and was conducted in 2 stages: before (stage 1) and after (stage 2) drug detection results were provided to participants. Transcripts from 44 women who participated in both stages were analysed to understand the effect of presenting drug detection data on narratives of product use. Thirty-six women reported high adherence in stage 1, yet admitted non-use in stage 2, three reported high adherence in both stages (contrary to their drug detection results) and five had consistent responses across both stages and drug results. Presenting objective measures of use may facilitate more accurate product use reporting and should be evaluated in future prevention trials.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: The VOICE trial looked at the effectiveness of PrEP and vaginal microbicides in women in three African countries. One of the findings of the study was low product adherence among some women, based on retrospective drug level testing. In this paper, the authors compare data on product adherence from before and after participants were given plasma drug detection results. The findings are revealing, not least because many of women interviewed explained why they had claimed to be adhering to the drug, when they were not. Women gave many reasons for not being open about taking their medicines/use of the microbicide. It is interesting that a few women continued to say that they were good adherers, even when presented with drug plasma data, which suggested otherwise. This, the authors note, requires further investigation. 

The findings provide valuable evidence of the shortcomings of collecting self-reported adherence data. The use of biomedical markers to reveal drug plasma levels is important. However, the qualitative research, which documented the discussion around those findings, is both fascinating and extremely useful. Perhaps in future there will be an even greater willingness to fund good qualitative research as a key component of trials?

Africa
South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe
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Benefits of including males living with HIV in voluntary medical male circumcision - modelling analysis

Could circumcision of HIV-positive males benefit voluntary medical male circumcision programs in Africa? Mathematical modeling analysis.

Awad SF, Sgaier SK, Lau FK, Mohamoud YA, Tambatamba BC, Kripke KE, Thomas AG, Bock N, Reed JB, Njeuhmeli E, Abu-Raddad LJ. PLoS One. 2017 Jan 24;12(1):e0170641. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0170641. eCollection 2017.

Background: The epidemiological and programmatic implications of inclusivity of HIV-positive males in voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) programs are uncertain. We modeled these implications using Zambia as an illustrative example.

Methods and findings: We used the Age-Structured Mathematical (ASM) model to evaluate, over an intermediate horizon (2010-2025), the effectiveness (number of VMMCs needed to avert one HIV infection) of VMMC scale-up scenarios with varying proportions of HIV-positive males. The model was calibrated by fitting to HIV prevalence time trend data from 1990 to 2014. We assumed that inclusivity of HIV positive males may benefit VMMC programs by increasing VMMC uptake among higher risk males, or by circumcision reducing HIV male-to-female transmission risk. All analyses were generated assuming no further antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up. The number of VMMCs needed to avert one HIV infection was projected to increase from 12.2 VMMCs per HIV infection averted, in a program that circumcises only HIV-negative males, to 14.0, in a program that includes HIV-positive males. The proportion of HIV-positive males was based on their representation in the population (e.g. 12.6% of those circumcised in 2010 would be HIV-positive based on HIV prevalence among males of 12.6% in 2010). However, if a program that only reaches out to HIV-negative males is associated with 20% lower uptake among higher-risk males, the effectiveness would be 13.2 VMMCs per infection averted. If improved inclusivity of HIV-positive males is associated with 20% higher uptake among higher-risk males, the effectiveness would be 12.4. As the assumed VMMC efficacy against male-to-female HIV transmission was increased from 0% to 20% and 46%, the effectiveness of circumcising regardless of HIV status improved from 14.0 to 11.5 and 9.1, respectively. The reduction in the HIV incidence rate among females increased accordingly, from 24.7% to 34.8% and 50.4%, respectively.

Conclusion: Improving inclusivity of males in VMMC programs regardless of HIV status increases VMMC effectiveness, if there is moderate increase in VMMC uptake among higher-risk males and/or if there is moderate efficacy for VMMC against male-to-female transmission. In these circumstances, VMMC programs can reduce the HIV incidence rate in males by nearly as much as expected by some ART programs, and additionally, females can benefit from the intervention nearly as much as males.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Evidence from randomised control trials and modelling studies suggest that voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) is a cost-effective HIV prevention programme. A deterministic compartmental age structured HIV model was used to assess benefits of including HIV positive males in VMMC programmes. The HIV model was parameterized using HIV biological and behavioural data for sub-Saharan Africa.  The model was fit to HIV prevalence for Zambia in the years between 1990 and 2014. The model used baseline circumcision coverages from Zambia Demographic and Health Survey 2007. The authors analysed the model for three VMMC programme scenarios; circumcising HIV negative males only, circumcising both HIV negative and HIV positive males, and circumcising males regardless of their HIV status. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to ascertain the robustness of key model assumptions on the study findings. The findings from the study suggest that, improving the inclusivity of all males is likely to improve the effectiveness of VMMC programmes.  This will be the case if there is moderate increase in uptake among higher-risk males and/or moderate VMMC efficacy in preventing male-to-female transmission. This is a very interesting modelling study which gives insights to policymakers on factors to consider in designing VMMC programmes. 

Africa
Zambia
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ART has dramatically improved life expectancy for people living with HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Trends in the burden of HIV mortality after roll-out of antiretroviral therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: an observational community cohort study.

Reniers G, Blom S, Calvert C, Martin-Onraet A, Herbst AJ, Eaton JW, Bor J, Slaymaker E, Li ZR, Clark SJ, Barnighausen T, Zaba B, Hosegood V Lancet HIV. 2016 Dec 9. pii: S2352-3018(16)30225-9. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30225-9

Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) substantially decreases morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. In this study, we describe population-level trends in the adult life expectancy and trends in the residual burden of HIV mortality after the roll-out of a public sector ART programme in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, one of the populations with the most severe HIV epidemics in the world.

Methods: Data come from the Africa Centre Demographic Information System (ACDIS), an observational community cohort study in the uMkhanyakude district in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We used non-parametric survival analysis methods to estimate gains in the population-wide life expectancy at age 15 years since the introduction of ART, and the shortfall of the population-wide adult life expectancy compared with that of the HIV-negative population (ie, the life expectancy deficit). Life expectancy gains and deficits were further disaggregated by age and cause of death with demographic decomposition methods.

Findings: Covering the calendar years 2001 through to 2014, we obtained information on 93 903 adults who jointly contribute 535 428 person-years of observation to the analyses and 9992 deaths. Since the roll-out of ART in 2004, adult life expectancy increased by 15.2 years for men (95% CI 12.4-17.8) and 17.2 years for women (14.5-20.2). Reductions in pulmonary tuberculosis and HIV-related mortality account for 79.7% of the total life expectancy gains in men (8.4 adult life-years), and 90.7% in women (12.8 adult life-years). For men, 9.5% is the result of a decline in external injuries. By 2014, the life expectancy deficit had decreased to 1.2 years for men (-2.9 to 5.8) and to 5.3 years for women (2.6-7.8). In 2011-14, pulmonary tuberculosis and HIV were responsible for 84.9% of the life expectancy deficit in men and 80.8% in women.

Interpretation: The burden of HIV on adult mortality in this population is rapidly shrinking, but remains large for women, despite their better engagement with HIV-care services. Gains in adult life-years lived as well as the present life expectancy deficit are almost exclusively due to differences in mortality attributed to HIV and pulmonary tuberculosis.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) sites allow for monitoring of population health through the collection of detailed data on tens of thousands of individuals. Such sites in countries with high HIV prevalence have played an important role in measuring the effects of large-scale programmes, such as the global roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The data presented in this paper, from the Africa Centre Demographic Information System (ACDIS) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, span 13 years (2001–14) and represent over 93 000 individuals living in an area with extremely high HIV prevalence (29% in adults aged 15–49 years in 2011). At least 15 000 of people studied were HIV-positive, of whom at least 2000 died. ART was first made available to people living with HIV (PLHIV) in this area in 2004.

Among adults aged 15–49 years, the authors report an overall reduction in death rate from 2001–14.  This translates into large increases in life expectancy (i.e., the expected number of years lived from age 15) of 15 and 17 years for men and women, respectively, between 2001 and 2014.  The changes in life expectancy are greater in people who were confirmed HIV-positive: 18 and 21 years for men and women, respectively, from 2007–14.  The large difference in life expectancies between the sexes that still exists (31 versus 44 years in HIV-positive men and women, respectively) are consistent with previously published estimates from Rwanda and Uganda. This study, however, illustrates that HIV-positive men are catching up to their HIV-negative counterparts faster than women are. The ‘deficit’ in 2014 - the gap in life expectancies between HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, was 1.2 years in men but still 5.3 years in women.

The authors propose that increased access to ART is the primary driver of the gains in life expectancy seen in this cohort. To further support this, they include data from verbal autopsies (VAs), which suggest that reductions in deaths due to HIV and pulmonary tuberculosis were responsible for 80% and 90% of the increases in life expectancy in men and women, respectively. VAs have limitations, however, particularly in areas of high HIV prevalence, but the overall mortality patterns suggested by these findings are likely to be accurate, even if the precise estimates differ.

The dramatic increases in life expectancy, in only seven years, for HIV-positive individuals in this cohort add to the encouraging observations from other low- and middle-income countries that many people receiving ART can expect to live for nearly as long as HIV-negative individuals.  Of course, people with advanced disease starting ART are still at high risk of death and there remain considerable challenges in getting treatment to all people in need of it. 

Africa
South Africa
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A step forward for HIV prevention in women

Safety and efficacy of a dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV prevention in women.

Nel A, van Niekerk N, Kapiga S, Bekker LG, Gama C, Gill K, Kamali A, Kotze P, Louw C, Mabude Z, Miti N, Kusemererwa S, Tempelman H, Carstens H, Devlin B, Isaacs M, Malherbe M, Mans W, Nuttall J, Russell M, Ntshele S, Smit M, Solai L, Spence P, Steytler J, Windle K, Borremans M, Resseler S, Van Roey J, Parys W, Vangeneugden T, Van Baelen B, Rosenberg Z; Ring Study Team. N Engl J Med. 2016 Dec;375(22):2133-2143.

Background: The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains high among women in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of extended use of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine for the prevention of HIV infection in 1959 healthy, sexually active women, 18 to 45 years of age, from seven communities in South Africa and Uganda.

Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned participants in a 2:1 ratio to receive vaginal rings containing either 25 mg of dapivirine or placebo. Participants inserted the rings themselves every 4 weeks for up to 24 months. The primary efficacy end point was the rate of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) seroconversion.

Results: A total of 77 participants in the dapivirine group underwent HIV-1 seroconversion during 1888 person-years of follow-up (4.1 seroconversions per 100 person-years), as compared with 56 in the placebo group who underwent HIV-1 seroconversion during 917 person-years of follow-up (6.1 seroconversions per 100 person-years). The incidence of HIV-1 infection was 31% lower in the dapivirine group than in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49 to 0.99; P=0.04). There was no significant difference in efficacy of the dapivirine ring among women older than 21 years of age (hazard ratio for infection, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.97) and those 21 years of age or younger (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.60; P=0.43 for treatment-by-age interaction). Among participants with HIV-1 infection, nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were detected in 14 of 77 participants in the dapivirine group (18.2%) and in 9 of 56 (16.1%) in the placebo group. Serious adverse events occurred more often in the dapivirine group (in 38 participants [2.9%]) than in the placebo group (in 6 [0.9%]). However, no clear pattern was identified.

Conclusions: Among women in sub-Saharan Africa, the dapivirine ring was not associated with any safety concerns and was associated with a rate of acquisition of HIV-1 infection that was lower than the rate with placebo. (Funded by the International Partnership for Microbicides; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01539226 .).

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The need to develop safe, effective tools for women, particularly young women and adolescent girls, remains a high priority in sub-Saharan Africa. Self-inserted vaginal rings, which provide sustained release of antiretroviral drugs over time, offer an option that women can initiate themselves. Two large randomised trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine in preventing HIV infection in women. This trial is published in the same issue of the New England Journal of Medicine as the trial by Baeten et al. (reviewed by HIV This Month in March 2016). Both trials were conducted in eastern and southern Africa where the incidence of HIV remains high.

As in the Baeten trial, this trial found a moderate reduction in HIV infection (31% lower) among women using the dapivirine vaginal ring compared with placebo. In both trials, protection was higher among women older than 21 years of age, although, unlike the Baeten trial, the difference in efficacy between the two age groups in this trial was not statistically significant. Baeten et al noted that biological measurement of adherence was higher among women older than 21 years (more than 70% overall) which may partly explain the higher protection observed. The investigators of both trials note that the genital tract of younger women may make them more susceptible to HIV infection. This warrants further investigation. Differences in the frequency of vaginal and/or anal sex across different age groups may also be important. In an editorial to accompany publication of these two important trials, Adimora notes that “providers and women must ensure that the HIV interventions that women adopt match their sexual behaviours and needs. Different women – and women at different life stages – will require different types of HIV prevention.”  

Africa
South Africa, Uganda
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Study finds rectal gel to be safe in men, but not as acceptable for daily use

MTN-017: a rectal phase 2 extended safety and acceptability study of tenofovir reduced-glycerin 1% gel.

Cranston RD, Lama JR, Richardson BA, Carballo-Dieguez A, Kunjara Na Ayudhya RP, Liu K, Patterson KB, Leu CS, Galaska B, Jacobson CE, Parikh UM, Marzinke MA, Hendrix CW, Johnson S, Piper JM, Grossman C, Ho KS, Lucas J, Pickett J, Bekker LG, Chariyalertsak S, Chitwarakorn A, Gonzales P, Holtz TH, Liu AY, Mayer KH, Zorrilla C, Schwartz JL, Rooney J, McGowan I; MTN-017 Protocol Team. Clin Infect Dis. 2016 Dec 16. pii: ciw832. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: HIV disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). Safe and acceptable topical HIV prevention methods that target the rectum are needed.

Methods: MTN-017 was a Phase 2, three-period, randomized sequence, open-label, expanded safety and acceptability crossover study comparing rectally applied reduced-glycerin (RG) 1% tenofovir (TFV) and oral emtricitabine/TFV disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF). In each 8-week study period participants were randomized to RG-TFV rectal gel daily; or RG-TFV rectal gel before and after receptive anal intercourse (RAI) (or at least twice weekly in the event of no RAI); or daily oral FTC/TDF.

Results: MSM and TGW (n=195) were enrolled from 8 sites in the United States, Thailand, Peru, and South Africa with mean age of 31.1 years (range 18-64). There were no differences in Grade 2 or higher adverse event rates in participants using daily gel (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR): 1.09, p=0.59) or RAI gel (IRR: 0.90, p=0.51) compared to FTC/TDF. High adherence (≥80% of prescribed doses as assessed by unused product return and SMS reports) was less likely in the daily gel regimen (Odds Ratio (OR): 0.35, p<0.001) and participants reported less likelihood of future daily gel use for HIV protection compared to FTC/TDF (OR: 0.38, p<0.001).

Conclusions: Rectal application of RG TFV gel was safe in MSM and TGW. Adherence and product use likelihood were similar for the intermittent gel and daily oral FTC/TDF regimens, but lower for the daily gel regimen.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: While microbicide gel to prevent HIV in women has not been consistently shown to be effective, scientific efforts to develop a rectal microbicide gel have continued in the hopes of finding a safe and effective product for HIV prevention in men. This paper presents a phase II clinical trial in which gay men and other men who have sex with men across four different countries were randomly assigned to one of three arms: oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (‘daily oral’), topical gel administered before and after receptive anal intercourse (‘RAI’), and topical gel administered daily (‘daily rectal’). The authors found that the rectal gel was safe to use, and was acceptable to participants, although the daily rectal application had lower acceptability and lower adherence than daily oral or the RAI.  This safety, adherence, and acceptability seen in this Phase II study supports further development of the gel as a rectal microbicide candidate, although consideration will need to be given to dosing regimens to maximize adherence. 

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Lies in clinical trials – the truth about data accuracy

Misreporting of product adherence in the MTN-003/VOICE trial for HIV prevention in Africa: participants' explanations for dishonesty.

Montgomery ET, Mensch B, Musara P, Hartmann M, Woeber K, Etima J, van der Straten. AIDS Behav. 2016 Nov 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Consistent over-reporting of product use limits researchers' ability to accurately measure adherence and estimate product efficacy in HIV prevention trials. While lying is a universal characteristic of the human condition, growing evidence of a stark discrepancy between self-reported product use and biologic or pharmacokinetic evidence demands examination of the reasons research participants frequently misrepresent product use in order to mitigate this challenge in future research. This study (VOICE-D) was an ancillary post-trial study of the vaginal and oral interventions to control the epidemic (VOICE) phase IIb trial (MTN 003). It was conducted in three African countries to elicit candid accounts from former VOICE trial participants about why actual product use was lower than reported. In total 171 participants were enrolled between December 2012 and March 2014 in South Africa (n = 47), Uganda (n = 59) and Zimbabwe (n = 65). Data suggested that participants understood the importance of daily product use and honest reporting, yet acknowledged that research participants typically lie. Participants cited multiple reasons for misreporting adherence, including human nature, self-presentation with study staff, fear of repercussions (study termination resulting in loss of benefits and experience of HIV-related stigma), a permissive environment in which it was easy to get away with misreporting, and avoiding inconvenient additional counseling. Some participants also reported mistrust of the staff and reciprocal dishonesty about the study products. Many suggested real-time blood-monitoring during trials would encourage greater fidelity to product use and honesty in reporting. Participants at all sites understood the importance of daily product use and honesty, while also acknowledging widespread misreporting of product use. Narratives of dishonesty may suggest a wider social context of hiding products from partners and distrust about research, influenced by rumors circulating in clinic waiting-rooms and surrounding communities. Prevailing power hierarchies between staff and participants may exacerbate misreporting. Participants recognized and suggested that objective, real-time feedback is needed to encourage honest reporting.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: The authors of this insightful paper set out the reasons women gave in a trial of vaginal and oral programmes for inaccurately reporting their behaviour during the trial.  The authors could conduct this study because biologic/pharmacokinetic data were available which showed evidence of product use. These data were shared with individual women. None of the reasons women gave for not telling the truth is surprising. They lied to avoid additional questioning from research staff.  They feared telling the truth would result in being removed from the trial. They feared beingreprimanded. Overall, not telling the truth about product use helped them save face and time. The findings do highlight the power difference between researchers and researched, something that is hard to avoid in many areas of research. This difference was exacerbated in some circumstances by the (reported) harsh behaviour of staff towards women. The ease with which women could manipulate pill counts or product use checks, by discarding unused product is also not surprising.  The perception by some women that the researchers had lied, because of changes in the trial part way through, is important to note. This highlights the importance of clear information when a trial is explained as it begins. It also points to the importance of continuous explanations and checking participant understanding. It cannot be assumed that there is a shared understanding between researcher and researched. This is something that is easily overlooked as a trial progresses and routine visits are established. The authors highlight the value of objective measures on product use.  They also observe that some participants suggested objective, real-time feedback, during trials.  However, the authors also note that for many women lying about aspects of their lives to partners and family, was a way of managing their lives. It could be that ‘real time feedback’ would act as a deterrent to participation for some in such circumstances.  No system of data collection is perfect.  It is, however, very useful to have a timely reminder that no interview data, however collected, can be assumed to be wholly accurate.    

Africa
South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe
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Improving programmes: a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies of treatment adherence programmes

Barriers and facilitators of interventions for improving antiretroviral therapy adherence: a systematic review of global qualitative evidence.

Ma Q, Tso LS, Rich ZC, Hall BJ, Beanland R, Li H, Lackey M, Hu F, Cai W, Doherty M, Tucker JD. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Oct 17;19(1):21166. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.21166. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: Qualitative research on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions can provide a deeper understanding of intervention facilitators and barriers. This systematic review aims to synthesize qualitative evidence of interventions for improving ART adherence and to inform patient-centred policymaking.

Methods: We searched 19 databases to identify studies presenting primary qualitative data on the experiences, attitudes and acceptability of interventions to improve ART adherence among PLHIV and treatment providers. We used thematic synthesis to synthesize qualitative evidence and the CERQual (Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative Research) approach to assess the confidence of review findings.

Results: Of 2982 references identified, a total of 31 studies from 17 countries were included. Twelve studies were conducted in high-income countries, 13 in middle-income countries and six in low-income countries. Study populations focused on adults living with HIV (21 studies, n=1025), children living with HIV (two studies, n=46), adolescents living with HIV (four studies, n=70) and pregnant women living with HIV (one study, n=79). Twenty-three studies examined PLHIV perspectives and 13 studies examined healthcare provider perspectives. We identified six themes related to types of interventions, including task shifting, education, mobile phone text messaging, directly observed therapy, medical professional outreach and complex interventions. We also identified five cross-cutting themes, including strengthening social relationships, ensuring confidentiality, empowerment of PLHIV, compensation and integrating religious beliefs into interventions. Our qualitative evidence suggests that strengthening PLHIV social relationships, PLHIV empowerment and developing culturally appropriate interventions may facilitate adherence interventions. Our study indicates that potential barriers are inadequate training and compensation for lay health workers and inadvertent disclosure of serostatus by participating in the intervention.

Conclusions: Our study evaluated adherence interventions based on qualitative data from PLHIV and health providers. The study underlines the importance of incorporating social and cultural factors into the design and implementation of interventions. Further qualitative research is needed to evaluate ART adherence interventions.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: This is a review of studies using qualitative methods to explore the experiences of people living with HIV and healthcare providers involved in programmes to support antiretroviral treatment adherence. The thematic synthesis is presented in two ways. First, the reviewed studies are categorised by types of adherence programmes, such as task shifting, education, or directly observed therapy. Secondly, the authors present themes that are common across all reviewed studies. These include: the benefits and challenges of employing lay healthcare workers; the need to maintain confidentiality in adherence programmes; the benefits of supporting empowerment and social relationships for people living with HIV; and the need for culturally appropriate information and practice. Overall the review illustrates that adherence programmes can have more impact if they address confidentiality, strengthen social ties among people living with HIV and their communities; provide adequate compensation and training for lay healthcare workers; and sensitively reflect local social, cultural and religious norms and beliefs. 

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HIV incidence halved among injecting drugs users in network outreach programme - Ukraine

HIV incidence among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in Ukraine: results from a clustered randomised trial.

Booth RE, Davis JM, Dvoryak S, Brewster JT, Lisovska O, Strathdee SA, Latkin CA. Lancet HIV. 2016 Oct;3(10):e482-9. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30040-6. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Background: HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Ukraine is among the highest in the world. In this study, we aimed to assess whether a social network intervention was superior to HIV testing and counselling in affecting HIV incidence among PWID. Although this was not the primary aim of the study, it is associated with reducing drug and sex risk behaviours, which were primary aims.

Methods: In this clustered randomised trial, PWID who were 16 years of age or older, had used self-reported drug injection in the past 30 days, were willing to be interviewed for about 1 hour and tested for HIV, were not too impaired to comprehend and provide informed consent, and, for this paper, who tested HIV negative at baseline were recruited from the streets by project outreach workers in three cities in southern and eastern Ukraine: Odessa, Donetsk, and Nikolayev. Index or peer leaders, along with two of their network members, were randomly assigned (1:1) by the study statistician to the testing and counselling block (control group) or the testing and counselling plus a social network intervention block (intervention group). No stratification or minimisation was done. Participants in the network intervention received five sessions to train their network members in risk reduction. Those participants assigned to the control group received no further intervention after counselling. The main outcome of this study was HIV seroconversion in the intent-to-treat population as estimated with Cox regression and incorporating a gamma frailty term to account for clustering. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov, number NCT01159704.

Findings: Between July 12, 2010, and Nov 23, 2012, 2304 PWIDs were recruited, 1200 of whom were HIV negative and are included in the present study. 589 index or peer leaders were randomly assigned to the control group and 611 were assigned to the intervention group. Of the 1200 HIV-negative participants, 1085 (90%) were retained at 12 months. In 553.0 person-years in the intervention group, 102 participants had seroconversion (incidence density 18.45 per 100 person-years; 95% CI 14.87-22.03); in 497.1 person-years in the control group 158 participants seroconverted (31.78 per 100 person-years; 26.83-36.74). This corresponded to a reduced hazard in the intervention group (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% CI 0.38-0.76, p=0.0003). No study-related adverse events were reported.

Interpretation: These data provide strong support for integrating peer education into comprehensive HIV prevention programmes for PWID and suggest the value in developing and testing peer-led interventions to improve access and adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis and antiretroviral therapy.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: People who inject drugs are at high risk of HIV infection, and, in many settings, are unlikely to have appropriate access to HIV prevention programmes. This study is a secondary, subgroup analysis of a randomised control of a social network programme for people who inject drugs in Ukraine (the primary outcome was HIV risk taking behaviour). The investigators recruited 256 index users, who subsequently recruited fellow members of their injection network to the study. Half (n=128) of the index participants were randomized to a two-week training programme in risk reduction education. These “peer leaders” were trained with the intention that they would disseminate these skills within their injection networks. The HIV incidence was alarmingly high. After 12 months, for the sub-group of participants who were initially HIV-negative, the incidence of seroconversion was 31.9/100 person-years in the control networks and 18.4/100 person-years in the programme networks, representing a 47% reduction in incidence associated with the programme. This study is notable for its randomized design, low attrition, close collaboration with local non-governmental organizations, a study protocol adaptation process which engaged drugs users and dealers, and a biological outcome measure. Further research can consider the economic costs for each averted HIV infection, whether the programme effects varied by other factors, and assessment of the extent to which the risk reduction skills were shared beyond study participants. The very high incidence, even among those receiving the intervention, emphasize the need for much greater investment in harm reduction approaches.

Europe
Ukraine
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Voluntary male circumcision still a cost-effective intervention in the era of 90-90-90

Impact and cost of scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision for HIV prevention in the context of the new 90-90-90 HIV treatment targets.

Kripke K, Reed J, Hankins C, Smiley G, Laube C, Njeuhmeli E. PLoS One. 2016 Oct 26;11(10):e0155734. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0155734. eCollection 2016.

Background: The report of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) for World AIDS Day 2014 highlighted a Fast-Track Strategy that sets ambitious treatment and prevention targets to reduce global HIV incidence to manageable levels by 2020 and end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. The 90-90-90 treatment targets for 2020 call for 90% of people living with HIV to know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their status to receive treatment, and 90% of people on HIV treatment to be virally suppressed. This paper examines how scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) services in four priority countries in sub-Saharan Africa could contribute to ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 in the context of concerted efforts to close the treatment gap, and what the impact of VMMC scale-up would be if the 90-90-90 treatment targets were not completely met.

Methods: Using the Goals module of the Spectrum suite of models, this analysis modified ART (antiretroviral treatment) scale-up coverage from base scenarios to reflect the 90-90-90 treatment targets in four countries (Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, and Uganda). In addition, a second scenario was created to reflect viral suppression levels of 75% instead of 90%, and a third scenario was created in which the 90-90-90 treatment targets are reached in women, with men reaching more moderate coverage levels. Regarding male circumcision (MC) coverage, the analysis examined both a scenario in which VMMCs were assumed to stop after 2015, and one in which MC coverage was scaled up to 90% by 2020 and maintained at 90% thereafter.

Results: Across all four countries, scaling up VMMC is projected to provide further HIV incidence reductions in addition to those achieved by reaching the 90-90-90 treatment targets. If viral suppression levels only reach 75%, scaling up VMMC leads to HIV incidence reduction to nearly the same levels as those achieved with 90-90-90 without VMMC scale-up. If only women reach the 90-90-90 targets, scaling up VMMC brings HIV incidence down to near the levels projected with 90-90-90 without VMMC scale-up. Regarding cost, scaling up VMMC increases the annual costs during the scale-up phase, but leads to lower annual costs after the MC coverage target is achieved.

Conclusions: The scenarios modeled in this paper show that the highly durable and effective male circumcision intervention increases epidemic impact levels over those of treatment-only strategies, including the case if universal levels of viral suppression in men and women are not achieved by 2020. In the context of 90-90-90, prioritizing continued successful scale-up of VMMC increases the possibility that future generations will be free not only of AIDS but also of HIV.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) has been shown to reduce the risk of female-to-male HIV transmission by up to 60%. It is a highly cost-effective HIV prevention activity. Since 2007, extensive efforts have been made to scale up VMMC in settings with high HIV prevalence and low levels of male circumcision, with the aim of reaching 80% VMMC coverage in 14 priority countries by 2016.  At the end of 2015, more than 11 million men in east and southern Africa had received VMMC.  In this modelling study, the authors look at the impact of scaling up VMMC to 90% coverage in four priority countries. The paper illustrates that VMMC scale-up can achieve additional reductions in HIV incidence above reductions achieved through testing and treatment alone. In the scenarios where the UNAIDS 90-90-90 treatment target is not completely met, VMMC scale-up can reduce HIV incidence to levels comparable to what would be achieved with the 90-90-90 treatment target. VMMC scale-up also resulted in lower long-term annual programme costs in all four settings. In 2015, UNAIDS set a target of an additional 27 million men in high-HIV prevalence settings receiving VMMC by 2021. Achieving this target will require new service delivery models, and innovative approaches to overcome current barriers that discourage men from accessing health care. VMMC is only one component in combination HIV prevention. It has advantages in being a single event that does not require ongoing adherence, offers men lifelong benefits, and is a valuable entry point for providing a broader range of health services to men including HIV testing. As this study demonstrates, VMMC remains a cost-effective strategy for reducing HIV incidence, even in the context of universal testing and treatment.  

Africa
Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Uganda
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Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention is cost-effective in the Netherlands

Cost-effectiveness analysis of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention in the Netherlands: a mathematical modelling study.

Nichols BE, Boucher CA, van der Valk M, Rijnders BJ, van de Vijver DA. Lancet Infect Dis. 2016 Sep 22. pii: S1473-3099(16)30311-5. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30311-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with tenofovir and emtricitabine prevents HIV infections among men who have sex with men (MSM). PrEP can be given on a daily or intermittent basis. Unfortunately, PrEP is not reimbursed in most European countries. Cost-effectiveness analyses of PrEP among MSM in Europe are absent but are key for decision makers to decide upon PrEP implementation.

Methods: We developed a deterministic mathematical model, calibrated to the well-defined Dutch HIV epidemic among MSM, to predict the effect and cost-effectiveness of PrEP. PrEP was targeted to 10% of highly sexually active Dutch MSM over the coming 40 years. Cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated to predict the cost-effectiveness of daily and on-demand PrEP. Cost-effectiveness ratios below euro20 000 were considered to be cost-effective in this analysis.

Findings: Within the context of a stable HIV epidemic, at 80% effectiveness and current PrEP pricing, PrEP can cost as much as euro11 000 (IQR 9400-14 100) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained when used daily, or as little as euro2000 (IQR 1300-3000) per QALY gained when used on demand. At 80% effectiveness, daily PrEP can be considered cost-saving if the price of PrEP is reduced by 70%, and on-demand PrEP can be considered cost-saving if the price is reduced by 30-40%.

Interpretation: PrEP for HIV prevention among MSM in the Netherlands is cost-effective. The use of PrEP is most cost-effective when the price of PrEP is reduced through on-demand use or through availability of generic PrEP, and can quickly be considered cost-saving.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Evidence surrounding the clinical effectiveness of pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection has been building for years (see HIV This Month January 2016 and February 2015).  This article now adds to the evidence with indications that pre-exposure prophylaxis is also cost-effective in a European setting.

The authors use a deterministic mathematical model to represent the HIV epidemic in the Netherlands among gay men and other men who have sex with men. They estimate the cost and cost-effectiveness of two models of pre-exposure prophylaxis usage: a daily dosage, and an ‘on demand’ dosage.  Their base case analysis found that both usage models fall under a willingness-to-pay ratio of €20 000 per QALY gained over a 40-year time horizon, although the ‘on demand’ model was least expensive at only €2000 (IQR 1300–3000) per QALY gained.  The model reflected some uncertainty around the results. However, very few results from the sensitivity analysis indicated a cost-per-QALY ratio above €20 000. Several scenarios indicated that pre-exposure prophylaxis was cost-saving. 

Pre-exposure prophylaxis was approved by the European Medicines Agency in July 2016, however it is currently not reimbursed by most European governments. This paper provides important evidence to make a case in favour of recommending reimbursement. Although the willingness-to-pay threshold used (€20 000/QALY) does not have any formal recognition in the Netherlands, several independent analyses soliciting the Dutch society’s value of a QALY reflect values much higher than this. As noted in the comment accompanying this paper (Niessen and Jaffar), the potential cost of implementing pre-exposure prophylaxis on a large-scale could be higher than current budgetary priorities allow. Still, this is an important study adding to the mounting evidence that countries should begin to consider how pre-exposure prophylaxis can be made available to people at highest risk of HIV infection.  

Europe
Netherlands
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