Articles tagged as "Health care delivery"

TB still responsible for large proportion of admissions and in-patient deaths among people living with HIV

TB as a cause of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ford N, Matteelli A, Shubber Z, Hermans S, Meintjes G, Grinsztejn B, Waldrop G, Kranzer K, Doherty M, Getahun H. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Jan 12;19(1):20714. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.20714. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: Despite significant progress in improving access to antiretroviral therapy over the past decade, substantial numbers of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in all regions continue to experience severe illness and require hospitalization. We undertook a global review assessing the proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths because of tuberculosis (TB) in PLHIV.

Methods: Seven databases were searched to identify studies reporting causes of hospitalizations among PLHIV from 1 January 2007 to 31 January 2015 irrespective of age, geographical region or language. The proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality attributable to TB was estimated using random effects meta-analysis.

Results: From an initial screen of 9049 records, 66 studies were identified, providing data on 35 845 adults and 2792 children across 42 countries. Overall, 17.7% (95% CI 16.0 to 20.2%) of all adult hospitalizations were because of TB, making it the leading cause of hospitalization overall; the proportion of adult hospitalizations because of TB exceeded 10% in all regions except the European region. Of all paediatric hospitalizations, 10.8% (95% CI 7.6 to 13.9%) were because of TB. There was insufficient data among children for analysis by region. In-hospital mortality attributable to TB was 24.9% (95% CI 19.0 to 30.8%) among adults and 30.1% (95% CI 11.2 to 48.9%) among children.

Discussion: TB remains a leading cause of hospitalization and in-hospital death among adults and children living with HIV worldwide.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The last 30 years have seen radical improvements in outcomes for many people living with HIV. This study reminds us that in some parts of the world HIV-associated infections, tuberculosis (TB) in particular, still have a devastating effect on thousands of lives.

The importance of TB is widely recognised. WHO aim to reduce deaths due to TB by 75% over the next 10 years.  The question remains: do we really know how many people die due to TB?  Death certification has repeatedly been shown to be unreliable, particularly in the parts of the world where TB is most prevalent. Verbal autopsy is used to estimate cause of death in areas with poor notification systems, but poorly differentiates deaths due to TB and other HIV-associated conditions. Similar challenges are faced when counting and classifying morbidity and hospitalisations. Data are sparse, and determining the cause of an admission is not straightforward, even with access to well-maintained hospital records.  

This review, a sub-analysis of data from a broader study of HIV-associated hospital admissions, is by far the largest of its kind. The authors have been rigorous, given the heterogeneity of the studies included, and their findings are sobering. Among adults living with HIV, in all areas except Europe and South America, TB was the cause of 20-33% of admissions, and some 30% of adults and 45% of children who were admitted with TB were thought to have died from it. These findings are limited by the fact that not all reviewed studies reported on mortality and very few stated how causes of death were assigned.

This paper raises more questions than it answers, but they are important questions.  We are left in no doubt that TB is a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive people, but we need to look closely at how we count and classify ‘TB deaths’ and ‘TB-associated admissions’. The recent systematic review of autopsy studies cited by the authors also found that almost half the TB seen at autopsy was not diagnosed before death. Global autopsy rates are in decline. Without access to more accurate data, how will we know if we’re winning or losing in our efforts to end TB deaths?

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Long-acting PrEP might offer a solution to the challenges of adherence

Potential clinical and economic value of long-acting preexposure prophylaxis for South African women at high-risk for HIV infection.

Walensky RP, Jacobsen MM, Bekker LG, Parker RA, Wood R, Resch SC, Horstman NK, Freedberg KA, Paltiel AD. J Infect Dis. 2015 Dec 17. pii: jiv523. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: For young South African women at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is one of the few effective prevention options available. Long-acting injectable PrEP, which is in development, may be associated with greater adherence, compared with that for existing standard oral PrEP formulations, but its likely clinical benefits and additional costs are unknown.

Methods: Using a computer simulation, we compared the following 3 PrEP strategies: no PrEP, standard PrEP (effectiveness, 62%; cost per patient, $150/year), and long-acting PrEP (effectiveness, 75%; cost per patient, $220/year) in South African women at high risk for HIV infection (incidence of HIV infection, 5%/year). We examined the sensitivity of the strategies to changes in key input parameters among several outcome measures, including deaths averted and program cost over a 5-year period; lifetime HIV infection risk, survival rate, and program cost and cost-effectiveness; and budget impact.

Results: Compared with no PrEP, standard PrEP and long-acting PrEP cost $580 and $870 more per woman, respectively, and averted 15 and 16 deaths per 1000 women at high risk for infection, respectively, over 5 years. Measured on a lifetime basis, both standard PrEP and long-acting PrEP were cost saving, compared with no PrEP. Compared with standard PrEP, long-acting PrEP was very cost-effective ($150/life-year saved) except under the most pessimistic assumptions. Over 5 years, long-acting PrEP cost $1.6 billion when provided to 50% of eligible women.

Conclusions: Currently available standard PrEP is a cost-saving intervention whose delivery should be expanded and optimized. Long-acting PrEP will likely be a very cost-effective improvement over standard PrEP but may require novel financing mechanisms that bring short-term fiscal planning efforts into closer alignment with longer-term societal objectives.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Standard oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective in preventing HIV and is one of the few proven prevention options available to young women at risk of HIV. However, daily adherence is key and trials have illustrated problems with adherence in several populations. Development of long-acting injectable formulations of PrEP may provide an option that does not require daily adherence to pills. In anticipation of new formulations of PrEP, this study modelled the potential clinical benefits, additional cost, cost-effectiveness and budget impact of existing and novel PrEP strategies. Given that the effectiveness and cost of long-acting PrEP is unknown, sensitivity analyses were conducted to look at varied effectiveness, HIV infection incidence, age at PrEP discontinuation and programmatic cost. The results suggest that long-acting PrEP is likely to be more clinically and cost-effective than standard oral PrEP. However, it will place an even greater strain on existing HIV prevention budgets. In addition to the research necessary to establish its clinical effectiveness, efforts to develop novel financing mechanisms are also required.         

Africa
South Africa
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Viral load monitoring could be cost-effective

Sustainable HIV treatment in Africa through viral-load-informed differentiated care.

Working Group on Modelling of Antiretroviral Therapy Monitoring Strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa, Phillips A, Shroufi A, Vojnov L, Cohn J, Roberts T, Ellman T, Bonner K, Rousseau C, Garnett G, Cambiano V, Nakagawa F, Ford D, Bansi-Matharu L, Miners A, Lundgren JD, Eaton JW, Parkes-Ratanshi R, Katz Z, Maman D, Ford N, Vitoria M, Doherty M, Dowdy D, Nichols B, Murtagh M, Wareham M, Palamountain KM, Chakanyuka Musanhu C, Stevens W, Katzenstein D, Ciaranello A, Barnabas R, Braithwaite RS, Bendavid E, Nathoo KJ, van de Vijver D, Wilson DP, Holmes C, Bershteyn A, Walker S, Raizes E, Jani I, Nelson LJ, Peeling R, Terris-Prestholt F, Murungu J, Mutasa-Apollo T, Hallett TB, Revill P. Nature. 2015 Dec 3;528(7580):S68-76. doi: 10.1038/nature16046.

There are inefficiencies in current approaches to monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients typically attend clinics every 1 to 3 months for clinical assessment. The clinic costs are comparable with the costs of the drugs themselves and CD4 counts are measured every 6 months, but patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes, a transition to more cost-effective delivery of antiretroviral therapy is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (the viral load) provides a direct measure of the current treatment effect. Viral-load-informed differentiated care is a means of tailoring care so that those with suppressed viral load visit the clinic less frequently and attention is focussed on those with unsuppressed viral load to promote adherence and timely switching to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach to measuring viral load in many countries is to collect dried blood spot samples for testing in regional laboratories; however, there have been concerns over the sensitivity and specificity of this approach to define treatment failure and the delay in returning results to the clinic. We use modelling to synthesize evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral-load-informed differentiated care, accounting for limitations of dried blood sample testing. We find that viral-load-informed differentiated care using dried blood sample testing is cost-effective and is a recommended strategy for patient monitoring, although further empirical evidence as the approach is rolled out would be of value. We also explore the potential benefits of point-of-care viral load tests that may become available in the future.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

 Editor’s notes: There has been much debate concerning how best to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. In the early stages of ART roll-out, there were concerns that if ART monitoring required laboratory testing, the high cost would divert resources away from treatment delivery. Guidelines were drawn up to allow monitoring based on clinical features, alone or with CD4 count monitoring. However, clinical and CD4 monitoring proved to be neither sensitive nor specific when compared to viral load monitoring. In practice, the number of people switched to second-line ART in resource-limited settings has been lower than predicted, particularly where monitoring is clinical or CD4-based. This raises concerns that, in the absence of viral load monitoring, some people will acquire resistance to first-line ART, and this will remain undetected, with the person receiving ineffective treatment for a prolonged period, resulting in the accumulation of resistance mutations. This could threaten the effectiveness of future treatment options, and increases the risk of transmission of drug-resistant viruses. In addition, the poor specificity of clinical and CD4-based definitions of “treatment failure” means that if these definitions are used to make decisions about switching to second line ART, many people who, in reality, have virologic suppression may be inappropriately switched to second-line ART.

Increasingly, there are calls for viral load monitoring to be made more widely available. This is technically challenging, particularly in remote areas. Dried blood spot samples are an alternative method for specimen collection and transport which is practical for remote facilities. Viral load monitoring using dried blood spots has been implemented in some settings. Interpretation of results needs to take account of the lower sensitivity and specificity when compared to viral load assays based on plasma.

This study used a mathematical model to explore outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a range of ART monitoring strategies. The authors found that monitoring based on viral load measurements using dried blood spots was cost-effective. The model assumed that in scenarios with clinical and/or CD4 monitoring patient visits would be three-monthly, whereas in the viral load monitoring scenario, individuals with suppressed viral load would attend clinic for monitoring less frequently (hence the term “viral load-informed differentiated care”). The reduction in visit frequency for people with suppressed viral load was the main driver of cost saving in this scenario.

The cost-effectiveness estimates considered only health sector costs and ignored any patient costs.  Even when treatment and care are free of charge, people incur substantial costs to attend clinics for HIV care, particularly because of loss of income and transport costs. If patient costs had been included, the savings due to reduced visit frequency would almost certainly be even greater.

The accuracy of models is inevitably dependent on the underlying assumptions (described in detail and with admirable clarity in the paper’s accompanying on-line supplement). Cost-effectiveness was sensitive to the cost of viral load monitoring, assumed to be $22 per test based on dried blood spots. These results support efforts to increase access to viral load monitoring. As the authors comment, empirical data from programmes employing viral load-informed differentiated care as a monitoring strategy would be very useful. 

Africa
Zimbabwe
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Following TB diagnostic algorithms: could do better

What happens after a negative test for tuberculosis? Evaluating adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms in South African primary health clinics.

McCarthy K, Grant AD, Chihota V, Ginindza S, Mvusi L, Churchyard G, Fielding K. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Nov 25. [Epub ahead of print]

Introduction and background: Diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) using sputum have suboptimal sensitivity among HIV-positive persons. We assessed health care worker adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms after negative sputum test result/s.

Methods: The XTEND trial compared outcomes among people tested for TB in primary care clinics using Xpert® MTB/RIF vs. smear microscopy as the initial test. We analysed data from XTEND participants who were HIV-positive or HIV status unknown, whose initial sputum Xpert® MTB/RIF or microscopy result was negative. If chest radiography, sputum culture or hospital referral took place, the algorithm for TB diagnosis was considered followed. Analysis of intervention (Xpert® MTB/RIF) effect on algorithm adherence used methods for cluster-randomised trials with small number of clusters.

Results: Amongst 4037 XTEND participants with initial negative test results, 2155 (53%) reported being or testing HIV positive and 540 (14%) had unknown HIV status. Amongst 2155 HIV-positive participants (684 [32%] male, mean age 37 years [range 18-79 years]), there was evidence of algorithm adherence amongst 515 (24%). Adherence was less likely among persons tested initially with Xpert® MTB/RIF vs. smear (14% [142/1031] vs 32% [364/1122], adjusted risk ratio 0.34 [95% CI 0.17-0.65]) and for participants with unknown vs. positive HIV status (59/540 [11%] vs. 507/2155 [24%]).

Conclusions: We observed poorer adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms amongst HIV-positive persons tested initially with Xpert® MTB/RIF vs. microscopy. Poor adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms and incomplete coverage of HIV testing represents a missed opportunity to diagnose TB and HIV, and may contribute to TB mortality.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Despite advances in the TB diagnostic field in recent years, molecular tests such as Xpert® MTB/RIF will still miss a substantial proportion of HIV-positive people with active TB disease. For that reason, diagnostic algorithms have been developed to guide further evaluation of people with symptoms suggestive of TB who test negative with Xpert®. This paper presents findings from South Africa that, in the context of a cluster-randomised trial, few people received further investigation according to the algorithm.

Only one in seven of the HIV-positive people with a negative Xpert® MTB/RIF had any further investigations recorded. Sputum culture was the most common investigation in this group but was done for only around one in ten. It should be noted that the outcome of having further investigations was largely based on review of clinic and laboratory records. As a result, it is possible that additional investigations were performed but remained undocumented. Although considerable between-clinic variation in performance was noted, the reasons underlying this were not explored in this analysis. The algorithm for people living with HIV was not overly complex and was broadly similar to the algorithm in place previously for investigation of people with a negative sputum smear. The observation that algorithm adherence was lower than for people with a negative smear suggests that health care workers might have had false confidence in the negative Xpert® result. In the broader context, this study took place at a time when there was much hype around Xpert® as a tool that would revolutionise the diagnosis of TB. It would not be surprising if this resulted in health care workers being over-confident in their interpretation of negative test results.

There are other possible explanations for the low numbers having additional investigations:

  • People may not have returned for their initial test result so further investigation was not possible (this is not quantified here)
  • People did return but symptoms had fully resolved or they were unable to produce sputum for further investigation
  • Health care workers used clinical judgement to decide on the need for further investigation rather than adhering strictly to the algorithm. This is supported at least partly by the fact that people with more TB symptoms were more likely to receive additional investigations. The yield of culture is not reported here – that might have given a further clue as to whether the people selected to have further investigations were individuals with a high likelihood of TB.  

These issues and others may need to be explored in future analyses to determine whether modifications to the algorithm are required or whether strengthened training and support of health care workers would improve adherence to the algorithm.

Avoid TB deaths
Africa
South Africa
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Violence experience of women living with HIV: a global study

Violence. Enough already: findings from a global participatory survey among women living with HIV.

Orza L, Bewley S, Chung C, Crone ET, Nagadya H, Vazquez M, Welbourn A. J Int AIDS Soc. 2015 Dec 1;18(6 Suppl 5):20285. doi: 10.7448/IAS.18.6.20285. eCollection 2015.

Introduction: Women living with HIV are vulnerable to gender-based violence (GBV) before and after diagnosis, in multiple settings. This study's aim was to explore how GBV is experienced by women living with HIV, how this affects women's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and human rights (HR), and the implications for policymakers.

Methods: A community-based, participatory, user-led, mixed-methods study was conducted, with women living with HIV from key affected populations. Simple descriptive frequencies were used for quantitative data. Thematic coding of open qualitative responses was performed and validated with key respondents.

Results: In total, 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries participated in the study. Eighty-nine percent of 480 respondents to an optional section on GBV reported having experienced or feared violence, either before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. GBV reporting was higher after HIV diagnosis (intimate partner, family/neighbours, community and health settings). Women described a complex and iterative relationship between GBV and HIV occurring throughout their lives, including breaches of confidentiality and lack of SRH choice in healthcare settings, forced/coerced treatments, HR abuses, moralistic and judgemental attitudes (including towards women from key populations), and fear of losing child custody. Respondents recommended healthcare practitioners and policymakers address stigma and discrimination, training, awareness-raising, and HR abuses in healthcare settings.

Conclusions: Respondents reported increased GBV with partners and in families, communities and healthcare settings after their HIV diagnosis and across the life-cycle. Measures of GBV must be sought and monitored, particularly within healthcare settings that should be safe. Respondents offered policymakers a comprehensive range of recommendations to achieve their SRH and HR goals. Global guidance documents and policies are more likely to succeed for the end-users if lived experiences are used.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Violence against women who are living with HIV is common globally. This paper reports on a study of 832 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in an online survey, recruited through a non-random snowball sampling model. The survey comprised quantitative and qualitative (free text) components. Participants included women who had ever or were currently using injection drugs (14%), who had ever or were currently selling sex (14%), and who had ever or were currently homeless (14%). Lifetime experience of violence among respondents was high (86%). Perpetrators included: intimate partner (59%), family member / neighbour (45%), community member (53%), health care workers (53%) and police, military, prison or detention services (17%). Findings suggest that violence is not a one off occurrence and cannot easily be packaged as a cause or a consequence of HIV. Instead violence occurs throughout women’s lives, takes multiple forms, and has a complex and iterative relationship with HIV.

The study population did not represent all women living with HIV, and was biased towards women with internet access who have an activist interest. Nonetheless, the study provides further evidence of the breadth and frequency of gender based violence experienced by women living with HIV. Key recommendations for policy makers include training of health care workers working in sexual and reproductive services to offer non-discriminatory services to women living with HIV and to effectively respond to disclosures of gender based violence (such as intimate partner violence) as part of the package of care.

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Togo, Transdniestria, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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HIV tests at church-based baby showers raise odds of testing 11-fold for pregnant women

Effect of a congregation-based intervention on uptake of HIV testing and linkage to care in pregnant women in Nigeria (baby shower): a cluster randomised trial.

Ezeanolue EE, Obiefune MC, Ezeanolue CO, Ehiri JE, Osuji A, Ogidi AG, Hunt AT, Patel D, Yang W, Pharr J, Ogedegbe G. Lancet Glob Health. 2015 Nov;3(11):e692-700. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00195-3.

Background: Few effective community-based interventions exist to increase HIV testing and uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in pregnant women in hard-to-reach resource-limited settings. We assessed whether delivery of an intervention through churches, the Healthy Beginning Initiative, would increase uptake of HIV testing in pregnant women compared with standard health facility referral.

Methods: In this cluster randomised trial, we enrolled self-identified pregnant women aged 18 years and older who attended churches in southeast Nigeria. We randomised churches (clusters) to intervention or control groups, stratified by mean annual number of infant baptisms (<80 vs ≥80). The Healthy Beginning Initiative intervention included health education and on-site laboratory testing implemented during baby showers in intervention group churches, whereas participants in control group churches were referred to health facilities as standard. Participants and investigators were aware of church allocation. The primary outcome was confirmed HIV testing. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier number NCT 01795261.

Findings: Between Jan 20, 2013, and Aug 31, 2014, we enrolled 3002 participants at 40 churches (20 per group). 1309 (79%) of 1647 women attended antenatal care in the intervention group compared with 1080 (80%) of 1355 in the control group. 1514 women (92%) in the intervention group had an HIV test compared with 740 (55%) controls (adjusted odds ratio 11.2, 95% CI 8.77-14.25; p<0.0001).

Interpretation: Culturally adapted, community-based programmes such as the Healthy Beginning Initiative can be effective in increasing HIV screening in pregnant women in resource-limited settings.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: HIV testing is a key entry point for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Community-based, decentralised HIV testing outside health facilities can increase uptake of testing among pregnant women, but this does not always follow through into good linkage to care.

In Nigeria faith-based organisations have a strong social network and a wider presence than health facilities. This trial co-ordinated churches in predominantly Christian southeast Nigeria to identify pregnant women early and organise a baby shower where on-site laboratory tests were provided. To avoid stigma the programme offered testing for five other conditions alongside HIV. Women who tested positive for HIV infection were linked to care and followed up at a post-delivery baby reception at the church. Women in the programme arm were more likely to have an HIV test and if positive they were more likely to access care before delivery and to start ART during pregnancy.

The results illustrate the benefits of engagement with faith-based organisations to reach communities that are poorly served by health facilities. The fact male partners played a role in the baby shower may have increased uptake, as pregnant women are more likely to accept HIV testing when male partners are also involved. The main costs were Mama Packs (a gift of essentials for a safe delivery, presented at the baby shower) and integrated lab tests. The activity was so popular that communities continued with it after the trial ended. The programme is now being adapted for mosques in northern Nigeria and Hindu temples in India. 

Africa
Nigeria
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Living with HIV on the move: migrant workers in north India

Complex routes into HIV care for migrant workers: a qualitative study from north India.

Rai T, Lambert HS, Ward H. AIDS Care. 2015 Nov 26:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]

Migrant workers are designated a bridge population in the spread of HIV and therefore if infected, should be diagnosed and treated early. This study examined pathways to HIV diagnosis and access to care for rural-to-urban circular migrant workers and partners of migrants in northern India, identifying structural, social and individual level factors that shaped their journeys into care. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with HIV-positive men (n = 20) and women (n = 13) with a history of circular migration, recruited from an antiretroviral therapy centre in one district of Uttar Pradesh, north India. Migrants and partners of migrants faced a complex series of obstacles to accessing HIV testing and care. Employment insecurity, lack of entitlement to sick pay or subsidised healthcare at destination and the household's economic reliance on their migration-based livelihood led many men to continue working until they became incapacitated by HIV-related morbidity. During periods of deteriorating health they often exhausted their savings on private treatments focused on symptom management, and sought HIV testing and treatment at a public hospital only following a medical or financial emergency. Wives of migrants had generally been diagnosed following their husbands' diagnosis or death, with access to testing and treatment mediated via family members. For some, a delay in disclosure of husband's HIV status led to delays in their own testing. Diagnosing and treating HIV infection early is important in slowing down the spread of the epidemic and targeting those at greatest risk should be a priority. However, despite targeted campaigns, circumstances associated with migration may prevent migrant workers and their partners from accessing testing and treatment until they become sick. The insecurity of migrant work, the dominance of private healthcare and gender differences in health-seeking behaviour delay early diagnosis and treatment initiation.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Migrant workers who move for work in their own country face challenges in accessing health care and social support. In a country as large and diverse as India internal migration can be particularly taxing. For people living with HIV, or who acquire HIV while migrating for work, the challenges can be immense. This paper sets out concisely the issues these migrants face, trying to access information, treatment and support both in the place they move to and at home. The authors explain how migrant men might delay treatment because of their need to work, and perhaps also to keep their HIV-status secret. For the wives of migrants, this delay can severely affect their own access to health care. Free antiretroviral therapy is available, but as the authors suggest, many migrant workers do not know that. This lack of knowledge highlights the importance of providing better support for migrant workers. Support for access to free, or at least affordable, health care is something many migrant workers require; for migrant workers living with HIV that support is essential.

Asia
India
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ART for people living with TB and HIV: practice still lags behind policy

The impact of HIV status and antiretroviral treatment on TB treatment outcomes of new tuberculosis patients attending co-located TB and ART services in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study.

Nglazi MD, Bekker LG, Wood R, Kaplan R. BMC Infect Dis. 2015 Nov 19;15(1):536. doi: 10.1186/s12879-015-1275-3.

Background: The implementation of collaborative TB-HIV services is challenging. We, therefore, assessed TB treatment outcomes in relation to HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) among TB patients attending a primary care service with co-located ART and TB clinics in Cape Town, South Africa.

Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, all new TB patients aged ≥ 15 years who registered and initiated TB treatment between 1 October 2009 and 30 June 2011 were identified from an electronic database. The effects of HIV-infection and ART on TB treatment outcomes were analysed using a multinomial logistic regression model, in which treatment success was the reference outcome.

Results: The 797 new TB patients included in the analysis were categorized as follows: HIV- negative, in 325 patients (40.8 %); HIV-positive on ART, in 339 patients (42.5 %) and HIV-positive not on ART, in 133 patients (16.7 %). Overall, bivariate analyses showed no significant difference in death and default rates between HIV-positive TB patients on ART and HIV-negative patients. Statistically significant higher mortality rates were found among HIV-positive patients not on ART compared to HIV-negative patients (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.25; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.53-6.91). When multivariate analyses were conducted, the only significant difference between the patient categories on TB treatment outcomes was that HIV-positive TB patients not on ART had significantly higher mortality rates than HIV-negative patients (adjusted OR 4.12; 95 % CI 1.76-9.66). Among HIV-positive TB patients (n = 472), 28.2 % deemed eligible did not initiate ART in spite of the co-location of TB and ART services. When multivariate analyses were restricted to HIV-positive patients in the cohort, we found that being HIV-positive not on ART was associated with higher mortality (adjusted OR 7.12; 95 % CI 2.95-18.47) and higher default rates (adjusted OR 2.27; 95 % CI 1.15-4.47).

Conclusions: There was no significant difference in death and default rates between HIV-positive TB patients on ART and HIV negative TB patients. Despite the co-location of services 28.2% of 472 HIV-positive TB patients deemed eligible did not initiate ART. These patients had a significantly higher death and default rates.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: There is clear evidence that for people with TB and HIV, particularly individuals with low CD4+ cell counts (<350 cells/µL), being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) during TB treatment reduces the risk of mortality. However, practice still lags far behind policy in this area, as in 2013, globally, only around a third of known HIV-positive people with TB were treated with ART. This paper from a single health centre in South Africa highlights the impact of this treatment gap, and emphasizes the fact that co-location of TB and HIV services does not always translate to integrated patient-centred care.

The people included in this analysis were treated for TB between 2009 and 2011, which was before South Africa adopted guidelines recommending ART for all people with TB testing positive for HIV. Nevertheless, the majority of the people living with HIV had CD4+ cell counts that would have made them eligible for ART at the time of the study. Although overall outcomes were relatively good, one in six people starting TB treatment died or were lost to follow-up. Mortality among HIV-positive people not on ART was substantially higher than individuals on ART and people who were HIV-negative. One in four people who were ART-eligible did not start ART. It was not clear whether some did not start ART because they had already died or had been lost to follow-up. In this analysis, there was no differentiation between people already on ART at the time of starting TB treatment and people who started ART during TB treatment.

This study illustrates that co-location of HIV and TB services does not necessarily meet peoples’ needs if care remains fragmented. Care was provided by different people, and the HIV and TB programmes had separate organizational structures, as is still common. Workable models of integrated, patient-centred care for HIV and TB are necessary. Furthermore, to achieve targets of ending TB deaths, we still need a deeper understanding of why people die after starting TB treatment.  

Avoid TB deaths
Africa
South Africa
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Expanding ART access: increasing costs

The HIV treatment gap: estimates of the financial resources needed versus available for scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in 97 countries from 2015 to 2020.

Dutta A, Barker C, Kallarakal A. PLoS Med. 2015 Nov 24;12(11):e1001907. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001907. eCollection 2015.

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) released revised guidelines in 2015 recommending that all people living with HIV, regardless of CD4 count, initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) upon diagnosis. However, few studies have projected the global resources needed for rapid scale-up of ART. Under the Health Policy Project, we conducted modeling analyses for 97 countries to estimate eligibility for and numbers on ART from 2015 to 2020, along with the facility-level financial resources required. We compared the estimated financial requirements to estimated funding available.

Methods and findings: Current coverage levels and future need for treatment were based on country-specific epidemiological and demographic data. Simulated annual numbers of individuals on treatment were derived from three scenarios: (1) continuation of countries' current policies of eligibility for ART, (2) universal adoption of aspects of the WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and (3) expanded eligibility as per the WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS "90-90-90" ART targets. We modeled uncertainty in the annual resource requirements for antiretroviral drugs, laboratory tests, and facility-level personnel and overhead.

We estimate that 25.7 (95% CI 25.5, 26.0) million adults and 1.57 (95% CI 1.55, 1.60) million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain current eligibility plans and increase coverage based on historical rates, which may be ambitious. If countries uniformly adopt aspects of the WHO 2013 guidelines, 26.5 (95% CI 26.0 27.0) million adults and 1.53 (95% CI 1.52, 1.55) million children could be on ART by 2020. Under the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 (95% CI 30.1, 30.7) million adults and 1.68 (95% CI 1.63, 1.73) million children could receive treatment by 2020. The facility-level financial resources needed for scaling up ART in these countries from 2015 to 2020 are estimated to be US$45.8 (95% CI 45.4, 46.2) billion under the current scenario, US$48.7 (95% CI 47.8, 49.6) billion under the WHO 2013 scenario, and US$52.5 (95% CI 51.4, 53.6) billion under the 90-90-90 scenario. After projecting recent external and domestic funding trends, the estimated 6-y financing gap ranges from US$19.8 billion to US$25.0 billion, depending on the costing scenario and the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief contribution level, with the gap for ART commodities alone ranging from US$14.0 to US$16.8 billion. The study is limited by excluding above-facility and other costs essential to ART service delivery and by the availability and quality of country- and region-specific data.

Conclusions: The projected number of people receiving ART across three scenarios suggests that countries are unlikely to meet the 90-90-90 treatment target (81% of people living with HIV on ART by 2020) unless they adopt a test-and-offer approach and increase ART coverage. Our results suggest that future resource needs for ART scale-up are smaller than stated elsewhere but still significantly threaten the sustainability of the global HIV response without additional resource mobilization from domestic or innovative financing sources or efficiency gains. As the world moves towards adopting the WHO 2015 guidelines, advances in technology, including the introduction of lower-cost, highly effective antiretroviral regimens, whose value are assessed here, may prove to be "game changers" that allow more people to be on ART with the resources available.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This is a complex and important paper that seeks to understand the financial requirements necessary to: a) continue countries’ current policies of eligibility for ART, b) roll out universal adoption of certain aspects of WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and c) expand eligibility as per WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS ‘90-90-90’ targets.

The authors estimated the number of adults and children eligible for and receiving HIV treatment, as well as the cost of providing ART in 97 countries across six regions, covering different income levels. They estimated that 25.7 million adults and 1.57 million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain the current eligibility strategies. If countries adopted WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, 26.5 million adults and 1.53 million children would be on ART by 2020, and if they adopted the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 million adults and 1.68 million children could receive treatment by then. The financial resources necessary for this scale up are estimated to be US$ 45.8 billion under current eligibility, US$ 48.7 billion under WHO 2013 scenario and US$ 52.5 billion under the 90-90-90 scenario. The estimated funding gap for the six year period ranges between US$ 20 and US$ 25 billion. In this study, the costs of commodities were taken directly from data collated by other organisations.  No empirical cost estimates of service delivery were made.  Nor was there an attempt to understand the cost implications of the development synergies and social and programme enablers that may be needed to increase the number of people living with HIV knowing their status.  The new WHO recommendations need to be actively pursued if we are to meet targets, rather than passively continuing with “business as usual”. 

Nonetheless, the findings of this study highlight the gap between guidelines written by WHO and very real programmatic obstacles on the ground. There is evidence to suggest that universal test-and-treat strategies could lead to substantially improved health outcomes at the population level, as well as potentially being cost-saving in the long-term. However, as the authors have illustrated, it would require increased levels of funding. What needs to be explored further now is how to overcome the logistical hurdles of rolling out such an initiative. Changing systems and practices is costly and takes time. Health workers will have to be retrained, data collection strategies will have to be revised. Expanding treatment may also mean increasing the number of health staff working on this initiative, which has an opportunity cost that may reverberate in other parts of the health system. Substantially altering health service provision, particularly in weak health systems, may have knock-on effects with unexpected and unintended consequences.

WHO guidelines serve a vital purpose of giving us a goal to aim for. But studies like this one help us know if and how we can get there. 

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Oceania
Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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Can children recognise HIV-associated symptoms in their carers? Evaluation of a verbal assessment tool for children in South Africa.

Measuring child awareness for adult symptomatic HIV using a verbal assessment tool: concordance between adult-child dyads on adult HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses.

Becker E, Kuo C, Operario D, Moshabela M, Cluver L. Sex Transm Infect. 2015 Nov;91(7):528-33. doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2014-051728. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Objectives: This study assessed children's awareness for adult HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses using a verbal assessment tool by analysing inter-rater reliability between adult-child dyads. This study also evaluated sociodemographic and household characteristics associated with child awareness of adult symptomatic HIV.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a representative community sample of adult-child dyads (N=2477 dyads) was conducted in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Analyses focused on a subsample (n=673 adult-child dyads) who completed verbal assessment interviews for symptomatic HIV. We used an existing validated verbal autopsy approach, originally designed to determine AIDS-related deaths by adult proxy reporters. We adapted this approach for use by child proxy reporters for reporting on HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses among living adults. Analyses assessed whether children could reliably report on adult HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses and adult provisional HIV status.

Results: Adult-child pairs concurred above the 65th percentile for 9 of the 10 HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses with sensitivities ranging from 10% to 100% and specificities ranging from 20% to 100%. Concordant reporting between adult-child dyads for the adult's provisional HIV status was 72% (sensitivity=68%, specificity=73%). Children were more likely to reliably match adult's reports of provisional HIV status when they lived in households with more household members, and households with more robust socioeconomic indicators including access to potable water, food security and television.

Conclusions: Children demonstrate awareness of HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses experienced by adults in their household. Children in households with greater socioeconomic resources and more household members were more likely to reliably report on the adult's provisional HIV status.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This study tested a new tool for assessing whether children who are caring for adults living with HIV in their household are able to recognise HIV-associated symptoms and illnesses. The study was conducted with households in one rural and one urban site in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The authors report on the analysis of results from a sub-sample of 673 dyads, composed of one adult and one child living in the same household. With the help of researchers, children aged 10-17, completed a verbal tool that was adapted for this study from a previous ‘verbal autopsy’ tool used to assess AIDS-associated deaths. The adult in each of the dyads also completed an adult version of the study’s adapted tool. The tool contained questions on ten symptoms and illnesses associated with HIV. Some of these strongly indicate HIV presence when found in a combination of two or more (e.g. TB; oral candidiasis; diarrhoea; herpes). Children-adult responses were compared in each dyad and tested for concurrency and sensibility. Overall, children and adult responses matched for more than 65% for nine out of ten of the symptoms/illnesses listed. There were variations in reliable matching depending on symptoms/illnesses. Some symptoms may have been harder for children to report on behalf of the adult, for example, constant diarrhoea. The tool used with the children may be useful for improving our understanding of the issues faced by young carers in households where some members are living with HIV. The tool may also help to understand strategies put in place by young carers looking after an adult with HIV-associated illnesses.

Africa
South Africa
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