Articles tagged as "HIV testing"

Evidence for large regional disparities in the quality of PMTCT provision across Ghana (2011-2013)

Towards elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Ghana: an analysis of national programme data.

Dako-Gyeke P, Dornoo B, Ayisi Addo S, Atuahene M, Addo NA, Yawson AE. Int J Equity Health. 2016 Jan 13;15(1):5. doi: 10.1186/s12939-016-0300-5.

Background: Despite global scale up of interventions for Preventing Mother-to-Child HIV Transmissions (PMTCT), there still remain high pediatric HIV infections, which result from unequal access in resource-constrained settings. Sub-Saharan Africa alone contributes more than 90% of global Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT) burden. As part of efforts to address this, African countries (including Ghana) disproportionately contributing to MTCT burden were earmarked in 2009 for rapid PMTCT interventions scale-up within their primary care system for maternal and child health. In this study, we reviewed records in Ghana, on ANC registrants eligible for PMTCT services to describe regional disparities and national trends in key PMTCT indicators. We also assessed distribution of missed opportunities for testing pregnant women and treating those who are HIV positive across the country. Implications for scaling up HIV-related maternal and child health services to ensure equitable access and eliminate mother-to-child transmissions by 2015 are also discussed.

Methods: Data for this review is from the National AIDS/STI Control Programme (NACP) regional disaggregated records on registered antenatal clinic (ANC) attendees across the country, who are also eligible to receive PMTCT services. These records cover a period of 3 years (2011-2013). Number of ANC registrants, utilization of HIV Testing and Counseling among ANC registrants, number of HIV positive pregnant women, and number of HIV positive pregnant women initiated on ARVs were extracted. Trends were examined by comparing these indicators over time (2011-2013) and across the ten administrative regions. Descriptive statistics were conducted on the dataset and presented in simple frequencies, proportions and percentages. These are used to determine gaps in utilization of PMTCT services. All analyses were conducted using Microsoft Excel 2010 version.

Results: Although there was a decline in HIV prevalence among pregnant women, untested ANC registrants increased from 17 % in 2011 to 25 % in 2013. There were varying levels of missed opportunities for testing across the ten regions, which led to a total of 487 725 untested ANC clients during the period under review. In 2013, Greater Accra (31 %), Northern (27 %) and Volta (48 %) regions recorded high percentages of untested ANC clients. Overall, HIV positive pregnant women initiated onto ARVs remarkably increased from 57% (2011) to 82 % (2013), yet about a third (33 %) of them in the Volta and Northern regions did not receive ARVs in 2013.

Conclusions: Missed opportunities to test pregnant women for HIV and also initiate those who are positive on ARVs across all the regions pose challenges to the quest to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Ghana. For some regions these missed opportunities mimic previously observed gaps in continuous use of primary care for maternal and child health in those areas. Increased national and regional efforts aimed at improving maternal and child healthcare delivery, as well as HIV-related care, is paramount for ensuring equitable access across the country.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Despite substantial improvement in antiretroviral therapy coverage in many countries over the last decade, over 200 000 infants still acquire the virus each year. Prevention of mother- to-child-transmission can, in theory, eliminate these infant infections and must be an essential component of HIV prevention strategies, particularly in countries with high HIV prevalence. In Ghana, prevention of mother-to-child-transmission activities is integrated with other maternal, neonatal and child health services, to achieve the highest possible level of coverage.

The goal of this study was to see how effectively the prevention of mother- to-child-transmission has been implemented across Ghana. Using data from antenatal care (ANC) clinics, two key metrics were assessed. They are: 1) the percentage of ANC attendees who are not tested for HIV and 2) the percentage of HIV positive ANC attendees who are not initiated on treatment. The percentage of missed opportunities for HIV testing among ANC attendees nationally increased from 17% to 25% between 2011 and 2013. This overall increase is worrying, and masks regional variations including an 84% increase in the central region. Overall the percentage of pregnant women living with HIV who are not initiated on treatment decreased substantially from 43% to 18%. However, there were still large geographical differences.

The authors suggest that the regional variation is indicative of inequities in the provision of health care. The evidence for attrition over time in the provision of HIV testing in ANC clinics is of particular concern. Perhaps this is a reflection of fatigue in HIV testing efforts among this group, even over this short period. The study highlights the importance of a timely and geographically disaggregated analysis of key metrics associated with a national HIV programme. This is vital in order to ensure effective and equitable coverage and to address deficiencies in the provision of HIV services. It also emphasises that efforts to achieve the UNAIDS 90:90:90 targets need sustained generalised programmes of health systems strengthening. 

Africa
Ghana
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TB still responsible for large proportion of admissions and in-patient deaths among people living with HIV

TB as a cause of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ford N, Matteelli A, Shubber Z, Hermans S, Meintjes G, Grinsztejn B, Waldrop G, Kranzer K, Doherty M, Getahun H. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Jan 12;19(1):20714. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.20714. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: Despite significant progress in improving access to antiretroviral therapy over the past decade, substantial numbers of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in all regions continue to experience severe illness and require hospitalization. We undertook a global review assessing the proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths because of tuberculosis (TB) in PLHIV.

Methods: Seven databases were searched to identify studies reporting causes of hospitalizations among PLHIV from 1 January 2007 to 31 January 2015 irrespective of age, geographical region or language. The proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality attributable to TB was estimated using random effects meta-analysis.

Results: From an initial screen of 9049 records, 66 studies were identified, providing data on 35 845 adults and 2792 children across 42 countries. Overall, 17.7% (95% CI 16.0 to 20.2%) of all adult hospitalizations were because of TB, making it the leading cause of hospitalization overall; the proportion of adult hospitalizations because of TB exceeded 10% in all regions except the European region. Of all paediatric hospitalizations, 10.8% (95% CI 7.6 to 13.9%) were because of TB. There was insufficient data among children for analysis by region. In-hospital mortality attributable to TB was 24.9% (95% CI 19.0 to 30.8%) among adults and 30.1% (95% CI 11.2 to 48.9%) among children.

Discussion: TB remains a leading cause of hospitalization and in-hospital death among adults and children living with HIV worldwide.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The last 30 years have seen radical improvements in outcomes for many people living with HIV. This study reminds us that in some parts of the world HIV-associated infections, tuberculosis (TB) in particular, still have a devastating effect on thousands of lives.

The importance of TB is widely recognised. WHO aim to reduce deaths due to TB by 75% over the next 10 years.  The question remains: do we really know how many people die due to TB?  Death certification has repeatedly been shown to be unreliable, particularly in the parts of the world where TB is most prevalent. Verbal autopsy is used to estimate cause of death in areas with poor notification systems, but poorly differentiates deaths due to TB and other HIV-associated conditions. Similar challenges are faced when counting and classifying morbidity and hospitalisations. Data are sparse, and determining the cause of an admission is not straightforward, even with access to well-maintained hospital records.  

This review, a sub-analysis of data from a broader study of HIV-associated hospital admissions, is by far the largest of its kind. The authors have been rigorous, given the heterogeneity of the studies included, and their findings are sobering. Among adults living with HIV, in all areas except Europe and South America, TB was the cause of 20-33% of admissions, and some 30% of adults and 45% of children who were admitted with TB were thought to have died from it. These findings are limited by the fact that not all reviewed studies reported on mortality and very few stated how causes of death were assigned.

This paper raises more questions than it answers, but they are important questions.  We are left in no doubt that TB is a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive people, but we need to look closely at how we count and classify ‘TB deaths’ and ‘TB-associated admissions’. The recent systematic review of autopsy studies cited by the authors also found that almost half the TB seen at autopsy was not diagnosed before death. Global autopsy rates are in decline. Without access to more accurate data, how will we know if we’re winning or losing in our efforts to end TB deaths?

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Adolescents, safer sex and HIV-status disclosure in South Africa

Sex and secrecy: how HIV-status disclosure affects safe sex among HIV-positive adolescents.

Toska E, Cluver LD, Hodes R, Kidia KK. AIDS Care. 2015 Dec;27 Suppl 1:47-58. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2015.1071775.

HIV-positive adolescents who engage in unsafe sex are at heightened risk for transmitting or re-acquiring HIV. Disclosure of HIV-status to sexual partners may impact on condom use, but no study has explored the effects of (i) adolescent knowledge of one's HIV-status, (ii) knowledge of partner status and (iii) disclosure to partners, on safer sex behaviour. This study aimed to identify whether knowledge of HIV-status by HIV-positive adolescents and partners was associated with safer sex. Eight hundred and fifty eight HIV-positive adolescents (10-19 years old, 52% female, 68.1% vertically infected) who had ever initiated antiretroviral treatment in 41 health facilities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were interviewed using standardised questionnaires. Quantitative analyses used multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for confounders. Qualitative research included interviews, focus group discussions and observations with 43 HIV-positive teenagers and their healthcare workers. N = 128 (14.9%) of the total sample had ever had sex, while N = 109 (85.1%) of sexually active adolescents had boy/girlfriend. In total, 68.1% of the sample knew their status, 41.5% of those who were sexually active and in relationships knew their partner's status, and 35.5% had disclosed to their partners. For adolescents, knowing one's status was associated with safer sex (OR = 4.355, CI 1.085-17.474, p = .038). Neither knowing their partner's status, nor disclosing one's HIV-status to a partner, were associated with safer sex. HIV-positive adolescents feared rejection, stigma and public exposure if disclosing to sexual and romantic partners. Counselling by healthcare workers for HIV-positive adolescents focused on benefits of disclosure, but did not address the fears and risks associated with disclosure. These findings challenge assumptions that disclosure is automatically protective in sexual and romantic relationships for HIV-positive adolescents, who may be ill-equipped to negotiate safer sex. There is a pressing need for effective interventions that mitigate the risks of disclosure and provide HIV-positive adolescents with skills to engage in safe sex.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Ninety percent of the world’s adolescents living with HIV, live in sub-Saharan Africa.  Evidence illustrates high levels of condomless sex with other adolescents (27-90%) and low rates of disclosure to sexual partners. Negotiating safer sexual practices is particularly challenging for HIV-positive adolescents, exacerbated by HIV-associated factors, learning and accepting their status, and withholding or disclosing their HIV status to sexual partners. There is a dearth of evidence on associations between disclosure and negotiating safer sexual practices among adolescents. This study examines the extent to which disclosure to, and by, adolescents living with HIV is associated with safer sex.

This mixed-methods study employed an iterative approach whereby preliminary qualitative findings guided quantitative measures, particularly items on disclosure. Emerging quantitative findings framed the thematic focus of qualitative research. The study was conducted in the eastern Cape, South Africa. Some 858 adolescents aged 10-19 years were recruited for the quantitative arm of the study. Some 43 participants were included in the qualitative arm of the study. Data generation methods used were individual interviews, focus group discussions and direct observations.

The findings indicate that among adolescents living with HIV, knowledge of HIV-status was strongly associated with safer sex. Knowing one’s partner’s status or disclosing one’s status was not.  Qualitative findings suggest that fear of rejection, exposure, and stigma discouraged HIV-positive adolescents from disclosing to their partners as a strategy for negotiating safer sex. Disclosure counselling and support from healthcare professionals did not address these challenges. Guidelines on counselling HIV-positive adolescents should focus on promoting safer sex with all sexual partners as a first priority, rather than promoting disclosure to sexual partners. Disclosure counselling for HIV-positive adolescents could also be enhanced by improving patient confidentiality, addressing adolescent fears on the dangers of disclosure and by giving HIV-positive adolescents skills to negotiate safer sex.

Africa
South Africa
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Condomless sex + viral suppression = ‘safe(r)’ sex? Challenging the laws that criminalise HIV transmission

HIV transmission law in the age of treatment-as-prevention.

Haire B, Kaldor J. J Med Ethics. 2015 Dec;41(12):982-6. doi: 10.1136/medethics-2014-102122. Epub 2015 Sep 29.

Evidence that treating people with HIV early in infection prevents transmission to sexual partners has reframed HIV prevention paradigms. The resulting emphasis on HIV testing as part of prevention strategies has rekindled the debate as to whether laws that criminalise HIV transmission are counterproductive to the human rights-based public health response. It also raises normative questions about what constitutes 'safe(r) sex' if a person with HIV has undetectable viral load, which has significant implications for sexual practice and health promotion. This paper discusses a recent high-profile Australian case where HIV transmission or exposure has been prosecuted, and considers how the interpretation of law in these instances impacts on HIV prevention paradigms. In addition, we consider the implications of an evolving medical understanding of HIV transmission, and particularly the ability to determine infectiousness through viral load tests, for laws that relate to HIV exposure (as distinct from transmission) offences. We conclude that defensible laws must relate to appreciable risk. Given the evidence that the transmissibility of HIV is reduced to negligible level where viral load is suppressed, this needs to be recognised in the framing, implementation and enforcement of the law. In addition, normative concepts of 'safe(r) sex' need to be expanded to include sex that is 'protected' by means of the positive person being virally suppressed. In jurisdictions where use of a condom has previously mitigated the duty of the person with HIV to disclose to a partner, this might logically also apply to sex that is 'protected' by undetectable viral load.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: The changing landscape of HIV treatment challenges assumptions about the HIV epidemic based on past knowledge and understanding. The authors of this paper set out why laws that criminalise HIV transmission may now need to change. This change is required because of the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the viral load of someone living with HIV and taking their treatment regularly. As the authors note ‘it is no longer reasonable to classify condomless sex as ‘unsafe’ if the partner with HIV has an undetectable viral load’ (p. 985).  What the authors do not discuss is whether someone on antiretroviral therapy does indeed have a suppressed viral load.  Indeed, whether the person’s viral load suppression may change between the act for which they are prosecuted, and the time of the prosecution, is not discussed. The viral load of someone living with HIV on treatment may not stay suppressed if there is a break in adherence. That said, this paper does very effectively highlight how the evolution of the HIV epidemic affects many areas of life and institutions; including laws that may be slow to adapt and change.

Oceania
Australia, New Zealand
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Predicting acute HIV infection in key populations

Targeted screening of at-risk adults for acute HIV-1 infection in sub-Saharan Africa.

Sanders EJ, Wahome E, Powers KA, Werner L, Fegan G, Lavreys L, Mapanje C, McClelland RS, Garrett N, Miller WC, Graham SM. AIDS. 2015 Dec;29 Suppl 3:S221-30. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000924.

Background: Patients with acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) have elevated infectivity, but cannot be diagnosed using antibody-based testing. Approaches to screen patients for AHI are urgently needed to enable counselling and treatment to reduce onward transmission.

Methods: We pooled data from four African studies of high-risk adults that evaluated symptoms and signs compatible with acute retroviral syndrome and tested for HIV-1 at each visit. AHI was defined as detectable plasma viral load or p24 antigen in an HIV-1-antibody-negative patient who subsequently seroconverted. Using generalized estimating equation, we identified symptoms, signs, and demographic factors predictive of AHI, adjusting for study site. We assigned a predictor score to each statistically significant predictor based on its beta coefficient, summing predictor scores to calculate a risk score for each participant. We evaluated the performance of this algorithm overall and at each site.

Results: We compared 122 AHI visits with 45 961 visits by uninfected patients. Younger age (18-29 years), fever, fatigue, body pains, diarrhoea, sore throat, and genital ulcer disease were independent predictors of AHI. The overall area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for the algorithm was 0.78, with site-specific AUCs ranging from 0.61 to 0.89. A risk score of at least 2 would indicate AHI testing for 5-50% of participants, substantially decreasing the number needing testing.

Conclusion: Our targeted risk score algorithm based on seven characteristics reduced the number of patients needing AHI testing and had good performance overall. We recommend this risk score algorithm for use by HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa with capacity to test high-risk patients for AHI.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This analysis adds to the literature around the performance of risk score algorithms to guide testing for acute HIV infection (AHI). The four studies included in this analysis involved key populations in different African settings. In common with previous analyses, genital ulcer disease had by far the strongest association with AHI. The derived algorithm had modest accuracy overall and poor performance in South Africa, where symptoms and signs were particularly infrequent.

Most studies included in this analysis were cohort studies following key individuals. Whether or not algorithms based on recording of symptoms and signs during intensive follow-up for AHI can be translated for use in a real world situation of unselected people presenting for health care remains unproven. Ultimately, we really need evidence about the impact and cost-effectiveness of detecting AHI in different populations. This is in order to define the role of testing for AHI, and in particular whether rationalising testing with algorithms such as this is necessary (especially for key populations).   

Africa
Kenya, Malawi, South Africa
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Why get tested for HIV in Russia?

Motivators and barriers to HIV testing among street-based female sex workers in St. Petersburg, Russia.

King EJ, Maman S, Dudina VI, Moracco KE, Bowling JM. Glob Public Health. 2015 Dec 28:1-16. [Epub ahead of print]

Female sex workers are particularly susceptible to HIV-infection in Russia. However, a dearth of information exists on their utilisation of HIV services. A mixed-methods, cross-sectional study was conducted to examine motivators and barriers to HIV testing among street-based sex workers in St. Petersburg, Russia. The health belief model was the theoretical framework for the study. Twenty-nine sex workers participated in in-depth interviews, and 139 sex workers completed interviewer-administered surveys between February and September 2009. Barriers to getting an HIV test were fear of learning the results, worrying that other people would think they were sick, and the distance needed to travel to obtain services. Motivators for getting tested were protecting others from infection, wanting to know one's status and getting treatment if diagnosed. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that knowing people living with HIV [aOR = 6.75, 95% CI (1.11, 41.10)] and length of time since start of injection drug use [aOR = 0.30, 95% CI (0.09, 0.97)] were significantly associated with recently getting tested. These results are important to consider when developing public health interventions to help female sex workers in Russia learn their HIV status and get linked to care and treatment services if needed.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: This paper summarises findings from a mixed-method study among a sample of female sex workers in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, the majority of whom also inject drugs. This is an important study, allowing the voices of a highly marginalised group to be heard and highlighting barriers and facilitators to HIV testing. Improving access to testing among this population is particularly important given the increased risk of HIV infection that they face. They are susceptible to HIV infection through both sexual and injecting transmission routes. The paper raises some important points such as the widespread misunderstanding about the severity of HIV in the absence of symptoms. HIV was not perceived to be a major problem among the population; there were more immediate problems associated with drug use and sex work. The necessity to travel for testing was seen as a barrier to HIV testing. For a population with multiple and complex health needs this is an acute problem given the vertical structure of the Russian health system. There is a lack of integration across sexual health, drug dependency and HIV and other infectious disease treatment services necessary for this population.  Many other structural barriers were reported to testing including  fear of being registered as having HIV, fear of stigma from friends and health care workers, fear of the unknown associated with infection and disease progression and uncertainty about availability of HIV treatment.  Concerns about treatment availability are particularly relevant since people who inject drugs are often denied HIV treatment in the Russian Federation while they continue to use drugs. This point is important in understanding the context in which HIV testing is accessed. Further discussion on what real benefits knowing your status brings weighed up against the disadvantages of knowing, warrants further discussion in the paper. We know that there is limited and often interrupted HIV treatment available and few ancillary services (such as opioid substitution therapy) to support maintenance of treatment.  We also know that there is much stigma associated with being HIV positive. People living with HIV experience frequent problems with employment and concerns about having children taken into care. All these problems are compounded if you use drugs or sell sex. In this context, the benefits of knowing your status is questionable and is bound to influence uptake of testing.

Asia, Europe
Russian Federation
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Violence experience of women living with HIV: a global study

Violence. Enough already: findings from a global participatory survey among women living with HIV.

Orza L, Bewley S, Chung C, Crone ET, Nagadya H, Vazquez M, Welbourn A. J Int AIDS Soc. 2015 Dec 1;18(6 Suppl 5):20285. doi: 10.7448/IAS.18.6.20285. eCollection 2015.

Introduction: Women living with HIV are vulnerable to gender-based violence (GBV) before and after diagnosis, in multiple settings. This study's aim was to explore how GBV is experienced by women living with HIV, how this affects women's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and human rights (HR), and the implications for policymakers.

Methods: A community-based, participatory, user-led, mixed-methods study was conducted, with women living with HIV from key affected populations. Simple descriptive frequencies were used for quantitative data. Thematic coding of open qualitative responses was performed and validated with key respondents.

Results: In total, 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries participated in the study. Eighty-nine percent of 480 respondents to an optional section on GBV reported having experienced or feared violence, either before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. GBV reporting was higher after HIV diagnosis (intimate partner, family/neighbours, community and health settings). Women described a complex and iterative relationship between GBV and HIV occurring throughout their lives, including breaches of confidentiality and lack of SRH choice in healthcare settings, forced/coerced treatments, HR abuses, moralistic and judgemental attitudes (including towards women from key populations), and fear of losing child custody. Respondents recommended healthcare practitioners and policymakers address stigma and discrimination, training, awareness-raising, and HR abuses in healthcare settings.

Conclusions: Respondents reported increased GBV with partners and in families, communities and healthcare settings after their HIV diagnosis and across the life-cycle. Measures of GBV must be sought and monitored, particularly within healthcare settings that should be safe. Respondents offered policymakers a comprehensive range of recommendations to achieve their SRH and HR goals. Global guidance documents and policies are more likely to succeed for the end-users if lived experiences are used.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Violence against women who are living with HIV is common globally. This paper reports on a study of 832 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in an online survey, recruited through a non-random snowball sampling model. The survey comprised quantitative and qualitative (free text) components. Participants included women who had ever or were currently using injection drugs (14%), who had ever or were currently selling sex (14%), and who had ever or were currently homeless (14%). Lifetime experience of violence among respondents was high (86%). Perpetrators included: intimate partner (59%), family member / neighbour (45%), community member (53%), health care workers (53%) and police, military, prison or detention services (17%). Findings suggest that violence is not a one off occurrence and cannot easily be packaged as a cause or a consequence of HIV. Instead violence occurs throughout women’s lives, takes multiple forms, and has a complex and iterative relationship with HIV.

The study population did not represent all women living with HIV, and was biased towards women with internet access who have an activist interest. Nonetheless, the study provides further evidence of the breadth and frequency of gender based violence experienced by women living with HIV. Key recommendations for policy makers include training of health care workers working in sexual and reproductive services to offer non-discriminatory services to women living with HIV and to effectively respond to disclosures of gender based violence (such as intimate partner violence) as part of the package of care.

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HIV tests at church-based baby showers raise odds of testing 11-fold for pregnant women

Effect of a congregation-based intervention on uptake of HIV testing and linkage to care in pregnant women in Nigeria (baby shower): a cluster randomised trial.

Ezeanolue EE, Obiefune MC, Ezeanolue CO, Ehiri JE, Osuji A, Ogidi AG, Hunt AT, Patel D, Yang W, Pharr J, Ogedegbe G. Lancet Glob Health. 2015 Nov;3(11):e692-700. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00195-3.

Background: Few effective community-based interventions exist to increase HIV testing and uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in pregnant women in hard-to-reach resource-limited settings. We assessed whether delivery of an intervention through churches, the Healthy Beginning Initiative, would increase uptake of HIV testing in pregnant women compared with standard health facility referral.

Methods: In this cluster randomised trial, we enrolled self-identified pregnant women aged 18 years and older who attended churches in southeast Nigeria. We randomised churches (clusters) to intervention or control groups, stratified by mean annual number of infant baptisms (<80 vs ≥80). The Healthy Beginning Initiative intervention included health education and on-site laboratory testing implemented during baby showers in intervention group churches, whereas participants in control group churches were referred to health facilities as standard. Participants and investigators were aware of church allocation. The primary outcome was confirmed HIV testing. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier number NCT 01795261.

Findings: Between Jan 20, 2013, and Aug 31, 2014, we enrolled 3002 participants at 40 churches (20 per group). 1309 (79%) of 1647 women attended antenatal care in the intervention group compared with 1080 (80%) of 1355 in the control group. 1514 women (92%) in the intervention group had an HIV test compared with 740 (55%) controls (adjusted odds ratio 11.2, 95% CI 8.77-14.25; p<0.0001).

Interpretation: Culturally adapted, community-based programmes such as the Healthy Beginning Initiative can be effective in increasing HIV screening in pregnant women in resource-limited settings.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: HIV testing is a key entry point for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Community-based, decentralised HIV testing outside health facilities can increase uptake of testing among pregnant women, but this does not always follow through into good linkage to care.

In Nigeria faith-based organisations have a strong social network and a wider presence than health facilities. This trial co-ordinated churches in predominantly Christian southeast Nigeria to identify pregnant women early and organise a baby shower where on-site laboratory tests were provided. To avoid stigma the programme offered testing for five other conditions alongside HIV. Women who tested positive for HIV infection were linked to care and followed up at a post-delivery baby reception at the church. Women in the programme arm were more likely to have an HIV test and if positive they were more likely to access care before delivery and to start ART during pregnancy.

The results illustrate the benefits of engagement with faith-based organisations to reach communities that are poorly served by health facilities. The fact male partners played a role in the baby shower may have increased uptake, as pregnant women are more likely to accept HIV testing when male partners are also involved. The main costs were Mama Packs (a gift of essentials for a safe delivery, presented at the baby shower) and integrated lab tests. The activity was so popular that communities continued with it after the trial ended. The programme is now being adapted for mosques in northern Nigeria and Hindu temples in India. 

Africa
Nigeria
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Expanding ART access: increasing costs

The HIV treatment gap: estimates of the financial resources needed versus available for scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in 97 countries from 2015 to 2020.

Dutta A, Barker C, Kallarakal A. PLoS Med. 2015 Nov 24;12(11):e1001907. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001907. eCollection 2015.

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) released revised guidelines in 2015 recommending that all people living with HIV, regardless of CD4 count, initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) upon diagnosis. However, few studies have projected the global resources needed for rapid scale-up of ART. Under the Health Policy Project, we conducted modeling analyses for 97 countries to estimate eligibility for and numbers on ART from 2015 to 2020, along with the facility-level financial resources required. We compared the estimated financial requirements to estimated funding available.

Methods and findings: Current coverage levels and future need for treatment were based on country-specific epidemiological and demographic data. Simulated annual numbers of individuals on treatment were derived from three scenarios: (1) continuation of countries' current policies of eligibility for ART, (2) universal adoption of aspects of the WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and (3) expanded eligibility as per the WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS "90-90-90" ART targets. We modeled uncertainty in the annual resource requirements for antiretroviral drugs, laboratory tests, and facility-level personnel and overhead.

We estimate that 25.7 (95% CI 25.5, 26.0) million adults and 1.57 (95% CI 1.55, 1.60) million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain current eligibility plans and increase coverage based on historical rates, which may be ambitious. If countries uniformly adopt aspects of the WHO 2013 guidelines, 26.5 (95% CI 26.0 27.0) million adults and 1.53 (95% CI 1.52, 1.55) million children could be on ART by 2020. Under the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 (95% CI 30.1, 30.7) million adults and 1.68 (95% CI 1.63, 1.73) million children could receive treatment by 2020. The facility-level financial resources needed for scaling up ART in these countries from 2015 to 2020 are estimated to be US$45.8 (95% CI 45.4, 46.2) billion under the current scenario, US$48.7 (95% CI 47.8, 49.6) billion under the WHO 2013 scenario, and US$52.5 (95% CI 51.4, 53.6) billion under the 90-90-90 scenario. After projecting recent external and domestic funding trends, the estimated 6-y financing gap ranges from US$19.8 billion to US$25.0 billion, depending on the costing scenario and the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief contribution level, with the gap for ART commodities alone ranging from US$14.0 to US$16.8 billion. The study is limited by excluding above-facility and other costs essential to ART service delivery and by the availability and quality of country- and region-specific data.

Conclusions: The projected number of people receiving ART across three scenarios suggests that countries are unlikely to meet the 90-90-90 treatment target (81% of people living with HIV on ART by 2020) unless they adopt a test-and-offer approach and increase ART coverage. Our results suggest that future resource needs for ART scale-up are smaller than stated elsewhere but still significantly threaten the sustainability of the global HIV response without additional resource mobilization from domestic or innovative financing sources or efficiency gains. As the world moves towards adopting the WHO 2015 guidelines, advances in technology, including the introduction of lower-cost, highly effective antiretroviral regimens, whose value are assessed here, may prove to be "game changers" that allow more people to be on ART with the resources available.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This is a complex and important paper that seeks to understand the financial requirements necessary to: a) continue countries’ current policies of eligibility for ART, b) roll out universal adoption of certain aspects of WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and c) expand eligibility as per WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS ‘90-90-90’ targets.

The authors estimated the number of adults and children eligible for and receiving HIV treatment, as well as the cost of providing ART in 97 countries across six regions, covering different income levels. They estimated that 25.7 million adults and 1.57 million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain the current eligibility strategies. If countries adopted WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, 26.5 million adults and 1.53 million children would be on ART by 2020, and if they adopted the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 million adults and 1.68 million children could receive treatment by then. The financial resources necessary for this scale up are estimated to be US$ 45.8 billion under current eligibility, US$ 48.7 billion under WHO 2013 scenario and US$ 52.5 billion under the 90-90-90 scenario. The estimated funding gap for the six year period ranges between US$ 20 and US$ 25 billion. In this study, the costs of commodities were taken directly from data collated by other organisations.  No empirical cost estimates of service delivery were made.  Nor was there an attempt to understand the cost implications of the development synergies and social and programme enablers that may be needed to increase the number of people living with HIV knowing their status.  The new WHO recommendations need to be actively pursued if we are to meet targets, rather than passively continuing with “business as usual”. 

Nonetheless, the findings of this study highlight the gap between guidelines written by WHO and very real programmatic obstacles on the ground. There is evidence to suggest that universal test-and-treat strategies could lead to substantially improved health outcomes at the population level, as well as potentially being cost-saving in the long-term. However, as the authors have illustrated, it would require increased levels of funding. What needs to be explored further now is how to overcome the logistical hurdles of rolling out such an initiative. Changing systems and practices is costly and takes time. Health workers will have to be retrained, data collection strategies will have to be revised. Expanding treatment may also mean increasing the number of health staff working on this initiative, which has an opportunity cost that may reverberate in other parts of the health system. Substantially altering health service provision, particularly in weak health systems, may have knock-on effects with unexpected and unintended consequences.

WHO guidelines serve a vital purpose of giving us a goal to aim for. But studies like this one help us know if and how we can get there. 

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Oceania
Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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Childhood sexual violence and HIV risk in Tanzania

HIV and childhood sexual violence: implications for sexual risk behaviors and HIV testing in Tanzania.

Chiang LF, Chen J, Gladden MR, Mercy JA, Kwesigabo G, Mrisho F, Dahlberg LL, Nyunt MZ, Brookmeyer KA, Vagi K. AIDS Educ Prev. 2015 Oct;27(5):474-87. doi: 10.1521/aeap.2015.27.5.474

Prior research has established an association between sexual violence and HIV. Exposure to sexual violence during childhood can profoundly impact brain architecture and stress regulatory response. As a result, individuals who have experienced such trauma may engage in sexual risk-taking behavior and could benefit from targeted interventions. In 2009, nationally representative data were collected on violence against children in Tanzania from 13-24 year old respondents (n = 3739). Analyses show that females aged 19-24 (n = 579) who experienced childhood sexual violence, were more likely to report no/infrequent condom use in the past 12 months (AOR = 3.0, CI [1.5, 6.1], p = 0.0017) and multiple sex partners in the past 12 months (AOR = 2.3, CI [1.0, 5.1], p = 0.0491), but no more likely to know where to get HIV testing or to have ever been tested. Victims of childhood sexual violence could benefit from targeted interventions to mitigate impacts of violence and prevent HIV.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: A growing body of evidence has established an association between sexual violence and increased vulnerability to HIV infection. Childhood sexual violence may increase HIV risk both directly (e.g. forced sex) and indirectly (e.g. through high-risk sex behaviours later in life). This paper examined two questions: is childhood violence exposure associated with (i) high-risk sexual behaviour in early adulthood and (ii) increased/decreased knowledge and uptake of HIV testing services.

A nationally representative sample of females aged 19-24 years were surveyed. Women were excluded from the analyses if they were not sexually active. Some 26.1% of 579 women reported childhood sexual violence (answering yes to one of four questions around unwanted touch / attempted rape / unwanted / coercive sexual intercourse before age 18 years). Childhood sexual violence was associated with (i) low / no condom use with someone other than husband / live in partner and (ii) >1 sexual partner, past 12 months. There was no association with knowledge or uptake of HIV testing services. These findings are consistent with research done elsewhere and suggest childhood sexual violence is associated with increased sexual risk taking behaviours in early adulthood. These findings present evidence for the importance of programmes to reduce childhood exposure to violence and focussed, adolescent-friendly sexual health services.

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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