Articles tagged as "Structural determinants and vulnerability"

Violence and educational outcomes among young children in South Africa and Malawi

Exposure to violence predicts poor educational outcomes in young children in South Africa and Malawi.

Sherr L, Hensels IS, Skeen S, Tomlinson M, Roberts KJ, Macedo A. Int Health. 2015 Dec 17. pii: ihv070. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Violence during childhood may affect short and long-term educational factors. There is scant literature on younger children from resource poor settings.

Methods: This study assessed child violence experiences (harsh punishment and exposure to domestic or community violence) and school enrolment, progress and attendance in children attending community-based organisations in South Africa and Malawi (n=989) at baseline and at 15 months' follow-up, examining differential experience of HIV positive, HIV affected and HIV unaffected children.

Results: Violence exposure was high: 45.4% experienced some form of psychological violence, 47.8% physical violence, 46.7% domestic violence and 41.8% community violence. Primary school enrolment was 96%. Violence was not associated with school enrolment at baseline but, controlling for baseline, children exposed to psychological violence for discipline were more than ten times less likely to be enrolled at follow-up (OR 0.09; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.57). Harsh discipline was associated with poor school progress. For children HIV positive a detrimental effect of harsh physical discipline was found on school performance (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.61).

Conclusion: Violence experiences were associated with a number of educational outcomes, which may have long-term consequences. Community-based organisations may be well placed to address such violence, with a particular emphasis on the challenges faced by children who are HIV positive.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: There is substantial evidence that demonstrates the negative effects of the experience of violence in childhood on child mental health. However, there is little evidence on the impact of violence on educational outcomes. This is due to measurement and study design, such as data being primarily cross-sectional and studies being confined to adolescents, where younger children are excluded. This study reports data from a longitudinal study of young children aged 4–13 years affected by HIV enrolled at community-based organisations (CBOs) in South Africa and Malawi. The study examined the relationship between exposure to violence at home or in the community on educational outcomes at baseline and follow-up (12–15 months later). In particular, attention was given to HIV positive and HIV affected children in order to explore the effects of HIV as a factor of either violence experience or educational risk in this age group. HIV affected children are children who may not be HIV positive themselves, but living in a household with a HIV positive member.

In this sample of young children (n=989), close to 14% were HIV positive. School enrolment and attendance was high, although HIV positive children had slightly lower attendance and enrolment in the correct grade for their age, compared to HIV affected children. At baseline, overall exposure to violence at home and in the community was very high. Over half of the sample had been exposed to two or more types of violence, whereas less than one in six reported no violence exposure at all. At both baseline and at follow-up, there was no association found between community violence and school enrolment and attendance or grade progression. In terms of violence experienced at home (domestic violence), at baseline there was an association with grade progression for children in households with no HIV. At follow-up, in particular for children living with HIV, use of physical violence to discipline the child had a detrimental effect on grade progression. Furthermore, at follow-up, the use of psychological violence to discipline children had an effect on school enrolment. Hence, children of caregivers using psychological violence for discipline were significantly less likely to be enrolled in school at follow-up, if they were not enrolled at baseline. Thus, findings from this study highlight that despite high rates of violence exposure in this population, children who are HIV positive, in particular, appear to be most at risk of poor educational outcomes. This is likely to be due to a range of inter-related risk factors that affect educational outcomes: parental death, shifting care arrangements, change in school, illness-induced poverty and increased care-giving responsibilities.  All these factors might affect a child’s ability to access schooling and perform well in the context of HIV. As shown, educational outcomes were specifically linked to harsh punishment, as opposed to community or domestic violence. Thus, CBOs that provide services for children affected by HIV might be key to intervening on this issue. Furthermore, younger children in HIV endemic countries are particularly vulnerable and educational achievement in the early years is an important pre-requisite for ongoing educational milestones.  

Africa
Malawi, South Africa
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Weighing up the risks and benefits of trial participation: understanding non-adherence in a PrEP trial

Participants' explanations for non-adherence in the FEM-PrEP clinical trial.

Corneli A, Perry B, McKenna K, Agot K, Ahmed K, Taylor J, Malamatsho F, Odhiambo J, Skhosana J, Van Damme L. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Nov 3. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: FEM-PrEP - a clinical trial of daily, oral emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for HIV prevention among women in sub-Saharan Africa - did not show a reduction in HIV acquisition because of low adherence to the study pill. We conducted a follow-up study to identify reasons for non-adherence.

Methods: Qualitative, semi-structured interviews (n=88) and quantitative, audio computer-assisted self-interviews (n=224) were conducted with former FEM-PrEP participants in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data, and descriptive statistics were used to describe ACASI responses. Data are presented within the five categories of Ickovics' and Meisler's conceptual framework on adherence: 1) the individual, 2) trial characteristics and study pill regimen, 3) patient-provider relationship, 4) clinical setting, and 5) the disease.

Results: Participants' explanations for non-adherence were primarily situated within three of the framework's five categories: 1) the individual, 2) trial characteristics and study pill regimen, and 3) the disease. Concerns about the investigational nature of the drug being tested and side effects were the prominent reasons reported for non-adherence. Participants also described being discouraged from taking the study pill by members of the community, their sexual partners, and other participants, primarily because of these same concerns. Limited acceptability of the pill's attributes influenced non-adherence for some participants as did concerns about HIV-related stigma. Additionally, many participants reported that others continued in FEM-PrEP while not taking the study pill because of the trial's ancillary benefits and visit reimbursement - factors related to the clinical setting. Negative patient-provider relationships were infrequently reported as a factor that influenced non-adherence.

Conclusion: Despite substantial study staff engagement with participants and communities, concerns about the study pill and discouragement from others appeared to have influenced non-adherence considerably. Alternative study designs or procedures and enhanced community engagement paradigms may be needed in future studies.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The authors of this important paper on a PrEP trial, end with a note of caution. They note that when interpreting the findings we should remember that the women in this study were taking a ‘study product’. The women were not taking a product of proven efficacy. Therefore, as the authors state, it would be wrong to assume that ‘African women cannot and will not be adherent if provided with PrEP outside of a clinical trial setting’. If they had been told that the product was efficacious, they may have behaved differently. This is important because a key message of the paper is that trial participants managed their participation so they felt comfortable in the trial. Many wanted to ensure they received benefits from their participation, including good health care, but they also wanted to manage risk. Risk associated with fears about the trial drug and risk from the disapproval of sexual partners about their participation. It is also very clear in these findings that the participants could manage the expectations of the trial team, by telling them what they wanted to hear during the trial. This suggests the limited value of ‘adherence questionnaires’ in some settings. The authors provide a powerful illustration of the value of mixed methods in trials of this sort. Drug concentration data told the researchers that many women were not adhering to the drug. Qualitative semi-structured interviews using this drug concentration data with the individual women helped the team to understand why. The authors also discuss the influence of community and family members in undermining participant faith in the trial. They explain the lengths that the trial team went to, to inform community members about the trial. Considerable time was given to sharing information. Doubts remained; concerns that were enough to discourage participation. This too is an important finding underlining the value of investing in community engagement in research. But it also highlights the need to find ways to enhance not just engagement, but also understanding and trust. 

Africa
Kenya, South Africa
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Benefits of available ART greater for women than men in South Africa, with many men not engaging with care

Mass HIV treatment and sex disparities in life expectancy: demographic surveillance in rural South Africa.

Bor J, Rosen S, Chimbindi N, Haber N, Herbst K, Mutevedzi T, Tanser F, Pillay D, Bärnighausen T. PLoS Med. 2015 Nov 24;12(11):e1001905. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001905. eCollection 2015.

Background: Women have better patient outcomes in HIV care and treatment than men in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed - at the population level - whether and to what extent mass HIV treatment is associated with changes in sex disparities in adult life expectancy, a summary metric of survival capturing mortality across the full cascade of HIV care. We also determined sex-specific trends in HIV mortality and the distribution of HIV-related deaths in men and women prior to and at each stage of the clinical cascade.

Methods and findings: Data were collected on all deaths occurring from 2001 to 2011 in a large population-based surveillance cohort (52 964 women and 45 688 men, ages 15 y and older) in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Cause of death was ascertained by verbal autopsy (93% response rate). Demographic data were linked at the individual level to clinical records from the public sector HIV treatment and care program that serves the region. Annual rates of HIV-related mortality were assessed for men and women separately, and female-to-male rate ratios were estimated in exponential hazard models. Sex-specific trends in adult life expectancy and HIV-cause-deleted adult life expectancy were calculated. The proportions of HIV deaths that accrued to men and women at different stages in the HIV cascade of care were estimated annually. Following the beginning of HIV treatment scale-up in 2004, HIV mortality declined among both men and women. Female adult life expectancy increased from 51.3 y (95% CI 49.7, 52.8) in 2003 to 64.5 y (95% CI 62.7, 66.4) in 2011, a gain of 13.2 y. Male adult life expectancy increased from 46.9 y (95% CI 45.6, 48.2) in 2003 to 55.9 y (95% CI 54.3, 57.5) in 2011, a gain of 9.0 y. The gap between female and male adult life expectancy doubled, from 4.4 y in 2003 to 8.6 y in 2011, a difference of 4.3 y (95% CI 0.9, 7.6). For women, HIV mortality declined from 1.60 deaths per 100 person-years (95% CI 1.46, 1.75) in 2003 to 0.56 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.48, 0.65) in 2011. For men, HIV-related mortality declined from 1.71 per 100 person-years (95% CI 1.55, 1.88) to 0.76 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.67, 0.87) in the same period. The female-to-male rate ratio for HIV mortality declined from 0.93 (95% CI 0.82-1.07) in 2003 to 0.73 (95% CI 0.60-0.89) in 2011, a statistically significant decline (p = 0.046). In 2011, 57% and 41% of HIV-related deaths occurred among men and women, respectively, who had never sought care for HIV in spite of the widespread availability of free HIV treatment. The results presented here come from a poor rural setting in southern Africa with high HIV prevalence and high HIV treatment coverage; broader generalizability is unknown. Additionally, factors other than HIV treatment scale-up may have influenced population mortality trends.

Conclusions: Mass HIV treatment has been accompanied by faster declines in HIV mortality among women than men and a growing female-male disparity in adult life expectancy at the population level. In 2011, over half of male HIV deaths occurred in men who had never sought clinical HIV care. Interventions to increase HIV testing and linkage to care among men are urgently needed.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: In South Africa and many other sub-Saharan African countries, mass treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has led to dramatic decreases in mortality and increases in life expectancy. South Africa has provided ART free-of-charge since 2004, but HIV-associated diseases remain the leading cause of death in adults. This paper uses clinical and demographic data from a longitudinal cohort in a rural area of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa to assess how gender differences in adult life expectancy and HIV-associated mortality changed between 2001 and 2011.

Overall life expectancy increased for both genders since 2004 with the effect significantly greater for females than males. The gender differential in life expectancy over the period 2004-2011 increased from 4.4 to 8.6 years. The analysis illustrates that this decrease was due to decreases in HIV-associated mortality rates, as HIV-cause-deleted life expectancy (i.e. life expectancy that would have occurred in the absence of HIV) remained constant over this period.

This study emphasizes the HIV treatment gap for men, with approximately half of all HIV-associated deaths in this population occurred among men who had never sought care. Mortality for men was significantly higher than that for women at each stage of the treatment cascade.

Although this study draws on data from one rural setting, many of the underlying characteristics reflect those seen in many other rural areas of the country. Further work is necessary to understand the underlying social and cultural factors that underlie these findings which could then lead to the development of programmes designed to address them. Such cross-disciplinary research which engages with people designing and implementing HIV programmes will need to be significantly enhanced over the coming decade in order to meet the UNAIDS 90:90:90 targets.

Africa
South Africa
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Living with HIV on the move: migrant workers in north India

Complex routes into HIV care for migrant workers: a qualitative study from north India.

Rai T, Lambert HS, Ward H. AIDS Care. 2015 Nov 26:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]

Migrant workers are designated a bridge population in the spread of HIV and therefore if infected, should be diagnosed and treated early. This study examined pathways to HIV diagnosis and access to care for rural-to-urban circular migrant workers and partners of migrants in northern India, identifying structural, social and individual level factors that shaped their journeys into care. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with HIV-positive men (n = 20) and women (n = 13) with a history of circular migration, recruited from an antiretroviral therapy centre in one district of Uttar Pradesh, north India. Migrants and partners of migrants faced a complex series of obstacles to accessing HIV testing and care. Employment insecurity, lack of entitlement to sick pay or subsidised healthcare at destination and the household's economic reliance on their migration-based livelihood led many men to continue working until they became incapacitated by HIV-related morbidity. During periods of deteriorating health they often exhausted their savings on private treatments focused on symptom management, and sought HIV testing and treatment at a public hospital only following a medical or financial emergency. Wives of migrants had generally been diagnosed following their husbands' diagnosis or death, with access to testing and treatment mediated via family members. For some, a delay in disclosure of husband's HIV status led to delays in their own testing. Diagnosing and treating HIV infection early is important in slowing down the spread of the epidemic and targeting those at greatest risk should be a priority. However, despite targeted campaigns, circumstances associated with migration may prevent migrant workers and their partners from accessing testing and treatment until they become sick. The insecurity of migrant work, the dominance of private healthcare and gender differences in health-seeking behaviour delay early diagnosis and treatment initiation.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Migrant workers who move for work in their own country face challenges in accessing health care and social support. In a country as large and diverse as India internal migration can be particularly taxing. For people living with HIV, or who acquire HIV while migrating for work, the challenges can be immense. This paper sets out concisely the issues these migrants face, trying to access information, treatment and support both in the place they move to and at home. The authors explain how migrant men might delay treatment because of their need to work, and perhaps also to keep their HIV-status secret. For the wives of migrants, this delay can severely affect their own access to health care. Free antiretroviral therapy is available, but as the authors suggest, many migrant workers do not know that. This lack of knowledge highlights the importance of providing better support for migrant workers. Support for access to free, or at least affordable, health care is something many migrant workers require; for migrant workers living with HIV that support is essential.

Asia
India
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More savings, more hope, and more HIV-preventive attitudes among vulnerable adolescent youth

Effect of savings-led economic empowerment on HIV preventive practices among orphaned adolescents in rural Uganda: results from the Suubi-Maka randomized experiment.

Jennings L, Ssewamala FM, Nabunya P. AIDS Care. 2015 Nov 7:1-10. [Epub ahead of print]

Improving economic resources of impoverished youth may alter intentions to engage in sexual risk behaviors by motivating positive future planning to avoid HIV risk and by altering economic contexts contributing to HIV risk. Yet, few studies have examined the effect of economic-strengthening on economic and sexual behaviors of orphaned youth, despite high poverty and high HIV infection in this population. Hierarchal longitudinal regressions were used to examine the effect of a savings-led economic empowerment intervention, the Suubi-Maka Project, on changes in orphaned adolescents' cash savings and attitudes toward savings and HIV-preventive practices over time. We randomized 346 Ugandan adolescents, aged 10-17 years, to either the control group receiving usual orphan care plus mentoring (n = 167) or the intervention group receiving usual orphan care plus mentoring, financial education, and matched savings accounts (n = 179). Assessments were conducted at baseline, 12, and 24 months. Results indicated that intervention adolescents significantly increased their cash savings over time (b = $US12.32, +/-1.12, p < .001) compared to adolescents in the control group. At 24 months post-baseline, 92% of intervention adolescents had accumulated savings compared to 43% in the control group (p < .001). The largest changes in savings goals were the proportion of intervention adolescents valuing saving for money to buy a home (DeltaT1-T0 = +14.9, p < .001), pursue vocational training (DeltaT1-T0 = +8.8, p < .01), and start a business (T1-T0 = +6.7, p < .01). Intervention adolescents also had a significant relative increase over time in HIV-preventive attitudinal scores (b = +0.19, +/-0.09, p < .05), most commonly toward perceived risk of HIV (95.8%, n = 159), sexual abstinence or postponement (91.6%, n = 152), and consistent condom use (93.4%, n = 144). In addition, intervention adolescents had 2.017 significantly greater odds of a maximum HIV-prevention score (OR = 2.017, 95%CI: 1.43-2.84). To minimize HIV risk throughout the adolescent and young adult periods, long-term strategies are needed to integrate youth economic development, including savings and income generation, with age-appropriate combination prevention interventions.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: This study contributes to the small but growing evidence on the effectiveness of economic strengthening activities for HIV prevention and treatment outcomes. It used a cluster randomised experimental design to evaluate the impact of a savings-led economic empowerment programme for orphaned adolescents on savings behaviour, as well as sexually protective attitudes. The authors report a significant and large impact on cash savings, as well as an increase in HIV-preventive attitudinal scores. This is particularly promising given the need to address the multiple needs of adolescent youth to promote their healthy transition to adulthood.

It is important to note that this study considered attitudinal outcomes, rather than biological or even reported behavioural ones. There are considerable limitations to such measures that often do not reflect actual sexual behaviours. Also, given the significant additional cost and economic benefits of the savings component in the programme arm, a key question remains, namely how incrementally cost-effective it is in achieving HIV and economic development goals. 

Africa
Uganda
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Client violence against female sex workers in Mexico

Prevalence and correlates of client-perpetrated violence against female sex workers in 13 Mexican cities.

Semple SJ, Stockman JK, Pitpitan EV, Strathdee SA, Chavarin CV, Mendoza DV, Aarons GA, Patterson TL. PLoS One. 2015 Nov 23;10(11):e0143317. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0143317. eCollection 2015.

Background: Globally, client-perpetrated violence against female sex workers (FSWs) has been associated with multiple health-related harms, including high-risk sexual behavior and increased exposure to HIV/STIs. This study examined correlates of client-perpetrated sexual, physical, and economic violence (e.g., robbery) against FSWs in 13 cities throughout Mexico.

Methods: FSWs (N = 1089) who were enrolled in a brief, evidence-based, sexual risk reduction intervention for FSWs (Mujer Segura) were interviewed about their work context, including experiences of violence perpetrated by clients, sexual risk and substance use practices, financial need, and social supports. Three broad categories of factors (sociodemographic, work context, behavioral and social characteristics of FSWs) were examined as correlates of sexual, physical, and economic violence.

Results: The prevalence of different types of client-perpetrated violence against FSWs in the past 6 months was: sexual (11.7%), physical (11.8%), economic (16.9%), and any violence (22.6%). Greater financial need, self-identification as a street worker, and lower perceived emotional support were independently associated with all three types of violence. Alcohol use before or during sex with clients in the past month was associated with physical and sexual violence. Using drugs before or during sex with clients, injection drug use in the past month, and population size of city were associated with sexual violence only, and FSWs' alcohol use score (AUDIT-C) was associated with economic violence only.

Conclusions: Correlates of client-perpetrated violence encompassed sociodemographic, work context, and behavioral and social factors, suggesting that approaches to violence prevention for FSWs must be multi-dimensional. Prevention could involve teaching FSWs strategies for risk avoidance in the workplace (e.g., avoiding use of alcohol with clients), enhancement of FSWs' community-based supports, development of interventions that deliver an anti-violence curriculum to clients, and programs to address FSWs' financial need by increasing their economic opportunities outside of the sex trade.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Violence against women who sell sex is receiving increasing attention. Perpetrators include clients, police, strangers, local thugs and husbands or intimate (non-paying) partners. This study from Mexico examined physical, sexual and emotional violence by clients among female sex workers in 13 cities in Mexico. Violence by clients was common (22.6% any violence, past six months) and similar to rates reported in other countries. Violence exposure was associated with greater financial need, street sex work, and lower perceived emotional support. Sexual and physical violence were also associated with alcohol use. Alcohol use, street sex work and debt have been associated with violence exposure among female sex workers in other low and middle income settings. This research supports a growing body of evidence which suggests that violence prevention should be a key element in services designed for and with female sex workers. Successful violence and HIV prevention programming will need to address the broader structural determinants of vulnerability such as poverty, sex work structure (typology), stigma and discrimination, and associated alcohol and drug use.  

Latin America
Mexico
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Vulnerabilities of children living with HIV positive adults

Children living with HIV-infected adults: estimates for 23 countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

Short SE, Goldberg RE. PLoS One. 2015 Nov 17; 10(11): e0142580.

Background: In sub-Saharan Africa many children live in extreme poverty and experience a burden of illness and disease that is disproportionately high. The emergence of HIV and AIDS has only exacerbated long-standing challenges to improving children's health in the region, with recent cohorts experiencing pediatric AIDS and high levels of orphan status, situations which are monitored globally and receive much policy and research attention. Children's health, however, can be affected also by living with HIV-infected adults, through associated exposure to infectious diseases and the diversion of household resources away from them. While long recognized, far less research has focused on characterizing this distinct and vulnerable population of HIV-affected children.

Methods: Using Demographic and Health Survey data from 23 countries collected between 2003 and 2011, we estimate the percentage of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult. We assess overlaps with orphan status and investigate the relationship between children and the adults who are infected in their households.

Results: The population of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult is substantial where HIV prevalence is high; in Southern Africa, the percentage exceeded 10% in all countries and reached as high as 36%. This population is largely distinct from the orphan population. Among children living in households with tested, HIV-infected adults, most live with parents, often mothers, who are infected; nonetheless, in most countries over 20% live in households with at least one infected adult who is not a parent.

Conclusion: Until new infections contract significantly, improvements in HIV/AIDS treatment suggest that the population of children living with HIV-infected adults will remain substantial. It is vital to on-going efforts to reduce childhood morbidity and mortality to consider whether current care and outreach sufficiently address the distinct vulnerabilities of these children.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This paper is an important contribution to the literature on the impact of the HIV epidemic. Using Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from 23 countries it highlights the considerable number of children living with HIV-positive adults in sub-Saharan Africa. However, notable exceptions from the analysis (no DHS data available) included South Africa. This, coupled with specific issues related to DHS data collection methods and response rates, means that the number of children living with HIV-positive adults is much higher. Reductions in mortality from HIV due to increased treatment availability and the addition of adults newly acquiring HIV means that population of children living with an HIV-positive adult will continue to increase in the near future.

Children living with HIV-positive adults are clearly vulnerable and like all vulnerable children should be focussed on in efforts to promote child wellbeing. The authors suggest, however, that children living with HIV-positive adults may have distinct vulnerabilities that need to be considered. These include direct exposure to opportunistic infections, social stigma and disrupted networks, as well as increases in poverty. The challenge for many countries is how to identify these children and ensure that focussed programmes are delivered effectively.

Africa
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Assessing the risk of HIV in older age in South Africa

HIV after 40 in rural South Africa: a life course approach to HIV vulnerability among middle aged and older adults.

Mojola SA, Williams J, Angotti N, Gomez-Olive FX. Soc Sci Med. 2015 Oct;143:204-12. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.08.023. Epub 2015 Aug 17.

South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world (over 6 million) as well as a rapidly aging population, with 15% of the population aged 50 and over. High HIV prevalence in rural former apartheid homeland areas suggests substantial aging with HIV and acquisition of HIV at older ages. We develop a life course approach to HIV vulnerability, highlighting the rise and fall of risk and protection as people age, as well as the role of contextual density in shaping HIV vulnerability. Using this approach, we draw on an innovative multi-method data set collected within the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System in South Africa, combining survey data with 60 nested life history interviews and 9 community focus group interviews. We examine HIV risk and protective factors among adults aged 40-80, as well as how and why these factors vary among people at older ages.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: A growing body of work is documenting the importance of HIV in older age in East and southern Africa. This paper is a valuable addition to the literature. The authors look at how the risk of HIV infection, and the impact of living with HIV, affects women and men aged 40-80 years old. Forty is a relatively young age for a study of older people, but the age span covered by this paper does allow the authors to trace HIV vulnerability for people actively engaged in migrant labour to when they settle, as they age into their 60s and 70s. The finding that risk of HIV-infection and vulnerability to the impact of HIV vary across the life course, is not new. But the findings presented in this paper provide a compelling picture of changing risk. Indeed, the possibility that men in their 60s might be at particular risk of acquiring HIV because of their wives diminishing interest in sex highlights the importance of not assuming only people under 50 are ‘sexually active’. The authors also illustrate the risk that older women face who may prefer to remain celibate but cannot always refuse to have sexual intercourse with their husbands. One notable finding is that older men with a pension are attractive partners for younger women in what the authors describe as a poverty stricken area. The mixture of quantitative and qualitative data the authors use provide both breadth and depth to the findings presented making this both an interesting and informative paper.

Africa
South Africa
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Childhood sexual violence and HIV risk in Tanzania

HIV and childhood sexual violence: implications for sexual risk behaviors and HIV testing in Tanzania.

Chiang LF, Chen J, Gladden MR, Mercy JA, Kwesigabo G, Mrisho F, Dahlberg LL, Nyunt MZ, Brookmeyer KA, Vagi K. AIDS Educ Prev. 2015 Oct;27(5):474-87. doi: 10.1521/aeap.2015.27.5.474

Prior research has established an association between sexual violence and HIV. Exposure to sexual violence during childhood can profoundly impact brain architecture and stress regulatory response. As a result, individuals who have experienced such trauma may engage in sexual risk-taking behavior and could benefit from targeted interventions. In 2009, nationally representative data were collected on violence against children in Tanzania from 13-24 year old respondents (n = 3739). Analyses show that females aged 19-24 (n = 579) who experienced childhood sexual violence, were more likely to report no/infrequent condom use in the past 12 months (AOR = 3.0, CI [1.5, 6.1], p = 0.0017) and multiple sex partners in the past 12 months (AOR = 2.3, CI [1.0, 5.1], p = 0.0491), but no more likely to know where to get HIV testing or to have ever been tested. Victims of childhood sexual violence could benefit from targeted interventions to mitigate impacts of violence and prevent HIV.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: A growing body of evidence has established an association between sexual violence and increased vulnerability to HIV infection. Childhood sexual violence may increase HIV risk both directly (e.g. forced sex) and indirectly (e.g. through high-risk sex behaviours later in life). This paper examined two questions: is childhood violence exposure associated with (i) high-risk sexual behaviour in early adulthood and (ii) increased/decreased knowledge and uptake of HIV testing services.

A nationally representative sample of females aged 19-24 years were surveyed. Women were excluded from the analyses if they were not sexually active. Some 26.1% of 579 women reported childhood sexual violence (answering yes to one of four questions around unwanted touch / attempted rape / unwanted / coercive sexual intercourse before age 18 years). Childhood sexual violence was associated with (i) low / no condom use with someone other than husband / live in partner and (ii) >1 sexual partner, past 12 months. There was no association with knowledge or uptake of HIV testing services. These findings are consistent with research done elsewhere and suggest childhood sexual violence is associated with increased sexual risk taking behaviours in early adulthood. These findings present evidence for the importance of programmes to reduce childhood exposure to violence and focussed, adolescent-friendly sexual health services.

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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Effective, long-term programmes for alcohol and sexual risk reduction are yet to be shown

HIV-alcohol risk reduction interventions in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the literature and recommendations for a way forward.

Carrasco MA, Esser MB, Sparks A, Kaufman MR. AIDS Behav. 2015 Oct 29. [Epub ahead of print]

Sub-Saharan Africa bears 69% of the global burden of HIV, and strong evidence indicates an association between alcohol consumption, HIV risk behavior, and HIV incidence. However, characteristics of efficacious HIV-alcohol risk reduction interventions are not well known. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the characteristics and synthesize the findings of HIV-alcohol risk reduction interventions implemented in the region and reported in peer-reviewed journals. Of 644 citations screened, 19 met the inclusion criteria for this review. A discussion of methodological challenges, research gaps, and recommendations for future interventions is included. Relatively few interventions were found, and evidence is mixed about the efficacy of HIV-alcohol risk reduction interventions. There is a need to further integrate HIV-alcohol risk reduction components into HIV prevention programming and to document results from such integration. Additionally, research on larger scale, multi-level interventions is needed to identify effective HIV-alcohol risk reduction strategies.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Alcohol and risk of HIV have been shown to be linked, yet little is known about which programmes are best at reducing this risk. This paper features a systematic review updating a previous review published by the authors in 2011. While this update found several more programmes aimed at reducing risky behaviour caused by alcohol use and in more countries than just the one previously, South Africa, the results of the review are largely the same. Most programmes had limited follow-up time of participants and found a dissipating effect over time. Additionally, older models of behaviour change were primarily used as the frameworks upon which these programmes were built. These models focus only on individual behaviour and not on the structural factors further affecting consumption of alcohol and risky sexual behaviour. On a positive note, some studies found moderate success based on location of the programme, clinic versus bar or tavern setting for instance. This review clearly demonstrates the need for further efforts to integrate alcohol risk reduction components into HIV prevention programmes, particularly for populations in which alcohol consumption is common.

Africa
Angola, Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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