Articles tagged as "Germany"

Falling death rates among people in HIV care: AIDS remains common, non-AIDS cancers need attention

Trends in underlying causes of death in people with HIV from 1999 to 2011 (D:A:D): a multicohort collaboration.

Smith CJ, Ryom L, Weber R, Morlat P, Pradier C, Reiss P, Kowalska JD, de Wit S, Law M, el Sadr W, Kirk O, Friis-Moller N, Monforte A, Phillips AN, Sabin CA, Lundgren JD, D:A:D Study Group. Lancet. 2014 Jul 19;384(9939):241-8. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60604-8.

Background: With the advent of effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy for people with HIV is now approaching that seen in the general population. Consequently, the relative importance of other traditionally non-AIDS-related morbidities has increased. We investigated trends over time in all-cause mortality and for specific causes of death in people with HIV from 1999 to 2011.

Methods: Individuals from the Data collection on Adverse events of anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study were followed up from March, 1999, until death, loss to follow-up, or Feb 1, 2011, whichever occurred first. The D:A:D study is a collaboration of 11 cohort studies following HIV-1-positive individuals receiving care at 212 clinics in Europe, USA, and Australia. All fatal events were centrally validated at the D:A:D coordinating centre using coding causes of death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. We calculated relative rates using Poisson regression.

Findings: 3 909 of the 49 731 D:A:D study participants died during the 308 719 person-years of follow-up (crude incidence mortality rate, 12.7 per 1 000 person-years [95% CI 12.3-13.1]). Leading underlying causes were: AIDS-related (1 123 [29%] deaths), non-AIDS-defining cancers (590 [15%] deaths), liver disease (515 [13%] deaths), and cardiovascular disease (436 [11%] deaths). Rates of all-cause death per 1 000 person-years decreased from 17.5 in 1999-2000 to 9.1 in 2009-11; we saw similar decreases in death rates per 1 000 person-years over the same period for AIDS-related deaths (5.9 to 2.0), deaths from liver disease (2.7 to 0.9), and cardiovascular disease deaths (1.8 to 0.9). However, non-AIDS cancers increased slightly from 1.6 per 1 000 person-years in 1999-2000 to 2.1 in 2009-11 (p=0.58). After adjustment for factors that changed over time, including CD4 cell count, we detected no decreases in AIDS-related death rates (relative rate for 2009-11 vs 1999-2000: 0.92 [0.70-1.22]). However, all-cause (0.72 [0.61-0.83]), liver disease (0.48 [0.32-0.74]), and cardiovascular disease (0.33 [0.20-0.53) death rates still decreased over time. The percentage of all deaths that were AIDS-related (87/256 [34%] in 1999-2000 and 141/627 [22%] in 2009-11) and liver-related (40/256 [16%] in 1999-2000 and 64/627 [10%] in 2009-11) decreased over time, whereas non-AIDS cancers increased (24/256 [9%] in 1999-2000 to 142/627 [23%] in 2009-11).

Interpretation: Recent reductions in rates of AIDS-related deaths are linked with continued improvement in CD4 cell count. We hypothesise that the substantially reduced rates of liver disease and cardiovascular disease deaths over time could be explained by improved use of non-HIV-specific preventive interventions. Non-AIDS cancer is now the leading non-AIDS cause and without any evidence of improvement.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Causes of death among people with HIV help to identify priorities for HIV care services. This very large cohort study, including nearly 50 000 HIV-positive people in industrialised country clinics, reports on changes in causes of death since 1999. Effective antiretroviral treatment was widely available for this cohort. All-cause mortality decreased over time, partly explained by effective antiretroviral therapy and increased CD4 cell counts. Death rates due to AIDS declined over time. However, even in 2009-11, AIDS remained a leading cause of death, suggesting that further efforts to diagnose and treat people with HIV earlier are required.

Deaths due to cardiovascular and liver-related causes decreased over time, even after adjustment for other potentially contributing factors. This suggests that people in this cohort were benefitting not only from good management of their HIV disease, but also from other preventive programmes for cardiovascular and other risk factors. By contrast, death rates due to non-AIDS-related cancers have not fallen, suggesting that more attention to prevention and early detection of common malignancies is needed.

Comorbidity, Epidemiology
  • share
0 comments.

Efavirenz dose reduction could help scale up antiretroviral therapy access

Efficacy of 400 mg efavirenz versus standard 600 mg dose in HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naive adults (ENCORE1): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, non-inferiority trial.

ENCORE1 Study Group. Lancet. 2014 Feb 7. pii: S0140-6736(13)62187-X. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62187-X. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: The optimum dose of key antiretroviral drugs is often overlooked during product development. The ENCORE1 study compared the efficacy and safety of reduced dose efavirenz with standard dose efavirenz in combination with tenofovir and emtricitabine as first-line treatment for HIV infection. An effective and safe reduced dose could yield meaningful cost savings.

Methods: ENCORE1 is a continuing non-inferiority trial in HIV-1-infected antiretroviral-naive adults in 38 clinical sites in 13 countries. Participants (plasma HIV-RNA >1000 log10 copies per mL, CD4 T-cell count 50-500 cells per µL) were randomly assigned by a computer-generated sequence with a blocking factor of four (stratified by clinical site and by screening viral load) to receive tenofovir plus emtricitabine with either a reduced daily dose (400 mg) or a standard dose (600 mg) of efavirenz. Participants, physicians, and all other trial staff were masked to treatment group. The primary endpoint was the difference in proportions of participants with plasma HIV-RNA of less than 200 copies per mL at 48 weeks. Treatment groups were regarded as non-inferior if the lower limit of the 95% CI for the difference in viral load was less than -10% by modified intention-to-treat analysis. Adverse events were summarised by treatment.

Findings: The modified intention-to-treat analysis consisted of 630 patients (efavirenz 400=321; efavirenz 600=309). 32% were women; 37% were African, 33% were Asian, and 30% were white. The mean baseline CD4 cell count was 273 cells per µL (SD 99) and median plasma HIV-RNA was 4.75 log10 copies per mL (IQR 0.88). The proportion of participants with a viral load below 200 copies per mL at week 48 was 94.1% for efavirenz 400 mg and 92.2% for 600 mg (difference 1.85%, 95% CI -2.1 to 5.79). CD4 T-cell counts at week 48 were significantly higher for the 400 mg group than for the 600 mg group (mean difference 25 cells per µL, 95% CI 6-44; p=0.01). We recorded no difference in grade or number of patients reporting adverse events (efavirenz 400=89.1%, efavirenz 600=88.4%; difference 0.75%, 95% CI -4.19 to 5.69; p=0.77). Study drug-related adverse events were significantly more frequent in the 600 mg group than in the 400 mg group (146% [47] vs 118 [37]), difference -10.5%, 95% CI -18.2 to -2.8; p=0.01) and significantly fewer patients with these events stopped treatment (400 mg=6 [2%], 600 mg=18 [6%], difference -3.96%, 95% CI -6.96 to -0.95; p=0.01).

Interpretation: Our findings suggest that a reduced dose of 400 mg efavirenz is non-inferior to the standard dose of 600 mg, when combined with tenofovir and emtricitabine during 48 weeks in ART-naive adults with HIV-1 infection. Adverse events related to the study drug were more frequent with 600 mg efavirenz than with 400 mg. Lower dose efavirenz should be recommended as part of routine care.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Nearly 10 million people in low- and middle-income countries were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) by the end of 2012, with plans to expand coverage to 15 million by 2015. Several challenges must be overcome if this target is to be achieved. One of the most pertinent of these is how to fund this expansion in the current economic climate. Significant progress has already been made in reducing the cost of first-line drugs. The authors of this paper propose an alternative approach to lowering drug costs, namely dose reduction.

Evidence supporting the 600mg dose of efavirenz used in clinical practice is weak, with no difference found in the proportion of patients achieving viral suppression in the original dose finding trials of 200mg, 400mg and 600mg (unpublished). This trial in ART-naive individuals found that 400mg was non-inferior to 600mg of efavirenz in terms of viral suppression over 48 weeks of follow-up. Findings were similar when stratified by ethnic group (African, Asian, other) and body mass index, both factors which influence drug concentrations. Furthermore, fewer patients on 400mg reported adverse events which were related to efavirenz, and fewer patients with drug-related side effects on this dose stopped efavirenz. These promising results support a dose reduction strategy. However, longer term outcomes need to be evaluated and efficacy studies in patients with tuberculosis are needed before the 400mg dose is recommended for use in routine clinical practice. Certainly, if drug companies agree to manufacture this dose at scale, preferably in fixed-dose combination tablets, cost-savings could be considerable.  

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America
  • share
0 comments.

CD4 counts at antiretroviral therapy start rising globally, but could do better!

Immunodeficiency at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy in low-,  middle-, and high-income countries.

The IeDEA and ART Cohort Collaborations. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2014 Jan 1;65(1):e8-e16. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e3182a39979.

Objective: To describe the CD4 cell count at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in low-income (LIC), lower middle-income (LMIC), upper middle-income (UMIC), and high-income (HIC) countries.

Methods: Patients aged 16 years or older starting cART in a clinic participating in a multicohort collaboration spanning 6 continents (International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS and ART Cohort Collaboration) were eligible. Multilevel linear regression models were adjusted for age, gender, and calendar year; missing CD4 counts were imputed.

Results: In total, 379 865 patients from 9 LIC, 4 LMIC, 4 UMIC, and 6 HIC were included. In LIC, the median CD4 cell count at cART initiation increased by 83% from 80 to 145 cells/µL between 2002 and 2009. Corresponding increases in LMIC, UMIC, and HIC were from 87 to 155 cells/µL (76% increase), 88 to 135 cells/µL (53%), and 209 to 274 cells/µL (31%). In 2009, compared with LIC, median counts were 13 cells/µL [95% confidence interval (CI): -56 to +30] lower in LMIC, 22 cells/µL (-62 to +18) lower in UMIC, and 112 cells/µL (+75 to +149) higher in HIC. They were 23 cells/µL (95% CI: +18 to +28 cells/µL) higher in women than men. Median counts were 88 cells/µL (95% CI: +35 to +141 cells/µL) higher in countries with an estimated national cART coverage >80%, compared with countries with <40% coverage.

Conclusions: Median CD4 cell counts at the start of cART increased 2000-2009 but remained below 200 cells/µL in LIC and MIC and below 300 cells/µL in HIC. Earlier start of cART will require substantial efforts and resources globally.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: In this multi-cohort analysis spanning six continents, median CD4 counts at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy were substantially higher in high-income compared to low- or middle-income countries. Median CD4 counts at initiation increased between 2002 and 2009 in most countries studied, but these increases were greater in low- and middle-income than high-income countries and were greater among men than women. Baseline CD4 counts in low- and middle-income countries were higher among countries with national antiretroviral therapy coverage of 80% or above. Nevertheless, despite the massive scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries since 2002, the increases in median CD4 count at the start of antiretroviral therapy have been modest. Substantial efforts and resources are needed to achieve earlier implementation of antiretroviral therapy globally.

  • share
0 comments.

Dolutegravir-based regimen superior to efavirenz-based regimen in treatment-naive patients

Dolutegravir plus abacavir-lamivudine for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

Walmsley SL, Antela A, Clumeck N, Duiculescu D, Eberhard A, Gutiérrez F, Hocqueloux L, Maggiolo F, Sandkovsky U, Granier C, Pappa K, Wynne B, Min S, Nichols G; SINGLE Investigators.  N Engl J Med. 2013 Nov 7;369(19):1807-18. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215541.

Background: Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572), a once-daily, unboosted integrase inhibitor, was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Dolutegravir, in combination with abacavir-lamivudine, may provide a simplified regimen.

Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study involving adult participants who had not received previous therapy for HIV-1 infection and who had an HIV-1 RNA level of 1 000 copies per milliliter or more. Participants were randomly assigned to dolutegravir at a dose of 50 mg plus abacavir-lamivudine once daily (DTG-ABC-3TC group) or combination therapy with efavirenz-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (DF)-emtricitabine once daily (EFV-TDF-FTC group). The primary end point was the proportion of participants with an HIV-1 RNA level of less than 50 copies per milliliter at week 48. Secondary end points included the time to viral suppression, the change from baseline in CD4+ T-cell count, safety, and viral resistance.

Results: A total of 833 participants received at least one dose of study drug. At week 48, the proportion of participants with an HIV-1 RNA level of less than 50 copies per milliliter was significantly higher in the DTG-ABC-3TC group than in the EFV-TDF-FTC group (88% vs. 81%, P=0.003), thus meeting the criterion for superiority. The DTG-ABC-3TC group had a shorter median time to viral suppression than did the EFV-TDF-FTC group (28 vs. 84 days, P<0.001), as well as greater increases in CD4+ T-cell count (267 vs. 208 per cubic millimeter, P<0.001). The proportion of participants who discontinued therapy owing to adverse events was lower in the DTG-ABC-3TC group than in the EFV-TDF-FTC group (2% vs. 10%); rash and neuropsychiatric events (including abnormal dreams, anxiety, dizziness, and somnolence) were significantly more common in the EFV-TDF-FTC group, whereas insomnia was reported more frequently in the DTG-ABC-3TC group. No participants in the DTG-ABC-3TC group had detectable antiviral resistance; one tenofovir DF-associated mutation and four efavirenz-associated mutations were detected in participants with virologic failure in the EFV-TDF-FTC group.

Conclusions: Dolutegravir plus abacavir-lamivudine had a better safety profile and was more effective through 48 weeks than the regimen with efavirenz-tenofovir DF-emtricitabine.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: In this 48- week double-blind randomized controlled trial in treatment-naive patients, dolutegravir plus abacavir / lamivudine outperformed efavirenz plus tenofovir / emtricitabine in terms of efficacy (viral suppression at 48 weeks and time to viral suppression), immunological recovery and discontinuation of therapy for adverse events. The difference in virologic response was largely due to higher levels of regimen discontinuation for adverse events in the efavirenz arm. The superior virologic response in the dolutegravir arm was consistent regardless of baseline viral load (above or below 100 000 copies/ml). 4% of patients in both arms developed virologic failure (two consecutive viral load measures >50 copies/ml). As expected, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) mutations and K65R mutations emerged in patients failing the efavirenz-based regimen; however no mutations emerged amongst patients failing the dolutegravir-based regimen.

 Dolutegravir is clearly an attractive future treatment option: its long half-life supports once a day dosing; there are few relevant drug interactions; trials performed to date show that it is well tolerated; and a fixed drug combination tablet of dolutegravir, abacavir and lamivudine is currently being developed. However, until the cost is lowered we are unlikely to see widespread use of this drug.

Europe, Northern America, Oceania
  • share
0 comments.

Explaining the life expectancy deficit of HIV positives in the era of ART

Do people with HIV infection have a normal life expectancy in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy?

Sabin CA. BMC Med. 2013 Nov 27;11(1):251.

There is evidence that the life expectancy (LE) of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has increased since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, mortality rates in recent years in HIV-positive individuals appear to have remained higher than would be expected based on rates seen in the general population. A low CD4 count, whether due to late HIV diagnosis, late initiation of cART, or incomplete adherence to cART, remains the dominant predictor of LE, and thus the individual's disease stage at initiation of cART (or thereafter) certainly contributes to these higher mortality rates. However, individuals with HIV also tend to exhibit lifestyles and behaviors that place them at increased risk of mortality, particularly from non-AIDS causes. Thus, although mortality rates among the HIV population may indeed remain slightly higher than those seen in the general population, they may be no higher than those seen in a more appropriately matched control group. Thus, further improvements in LE may now only be possible if some of the other underlying issues (for example, modification of lifestyle or behavioral factors) are tackled.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased dramatically in recent years, and current ART regimens are more efficacious and more forgiving of minor lapses in adherence. As a result the life expectancy of people living with HIV is approaching that of the general population in both resource-rich and resource-poor settings. However, despite the dramatic improvements, life expectancy for people living with HIV is still lower than the general population. This review shows that late HIV diagnosis and ART initiation, and imperfect retention in care are repeatedly identified as barriers to the normalization of life expectancy in HIV positive individuals. In addition, the review highlights non-HIV related factors that put people living with HIV at a higher mortality risk than the general population. This includes behavioural and lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol and recreational drug use, and other sexually transmitted co-infections. This review underscores the importance of early diagnosis and linkage to care for improving programme effectiveness. It also has implications for the design of future studies aiming to quantify the life expectancy deficit in HIV positive individuals such as identifying appropriately matched HIV-negative control populations for comparative mortality estimates. 

  • share
0 comments.

Intrauterine infections, but not obstetric complications, more common among pregnant women with HIV

HIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 

Calvert C, Ronsmans C. PLoS One. 2013 Oct 4;8(10):e74848. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0074848.

Background: Women of reproductive age in parts of sub-Saharan Africa are faced both with high levels of HIV and the threat of dying from the direct complications of pregnancy. Clinicians practicing in such settings have reported a high incidence of direct obstetric complications among HIV-infected women, but the evidence supporting this is unclear. The aim of this systematic review is to establish whether HIV-infected women are at increased risk of direct obstetric complications.

Methods and findings: Studies comparing the frequency of obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia and intrauterine infections in HIV-infected and uninfected women were identified. Summary estimates of the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HIV and each obstetric complication were calculated through meta-analyses. In total, 44 studies were included providing 66 data sets; 17 on haemorrhage, 19 on hypertensive disorders, five on dystocia and 25 on intrauterine infections. Meta-analysis of the OR from studies including vaginal deliveries indicated that HIV-infected women had over three times the risk of a puerperal sepsis compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled OR: 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00-5.85]; this figure increased to nearly six amongst studies only including women who delivered by caesarean (pooled OR: 5.81, 95% CI: 2.42-13.97). For other obstetric complications the evidence was weak and inconsistent.

Conclusions: The higher risk of intrauterine infections in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women may require targeted strategies involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics during labour. However, as the huge excess of pregnancy-related mortality in HIV-infected women is unlikely to be due to a higher risk of direct obstetric complications, reducing this mortality will require non obstetric interventions involving access to ART in both pregnant and non-pregnant women.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Women with HIV are thought to have a higher risk of adverse outcomes during pregnancy. This review is valuable in summarizing available data on this topic. Many of the included studies predated the wide availability of antiretroviral therapy. There was a clear association between HIV infection and intrauterine infections, but not with the other obstetric complications, e.g., obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia, examined in the review. Considering individual conditions analysed, HIV infection was associated with antepartum haemorrhage, (but not postpartum haemorrhage). It was also found to be associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (but not pre-eclampsia or eclampsia), and uterine rupture or prolonged labour (but not other complications of dystocia). The authors note that the studies were generally of low quality, and there were too few studies to examine the effect of antiretroviral therapy on these complications.  

Given the excess of intrauterine infections in women with HIV, the authors suggest that these might be preventable with prophylactic antibiotics. Overall, where causes of maternal mortality are documented, pregnant women with HIV are more likely to die of non-pregnancy related infections, than of obstetric complications. Specifically, non-pregnancy related infections are tuberculosis, pneumonia or meningitis. Pregnant women living with HIV need access to antenatal services and a skilled attendant at delivery. But, the top priority with respect to reducing maternal mortality is effective antiretroviral therapy.

  • share
0 comments.

Missed opportunities for vaginal delivery among women with HIV in Europe

Missed opportunities among HIV-positive women to control viral replication during pregnancy and to have a vaginal delivery.

 Aebi-Popp K, Mulcahy F, Glass TR, Rudin C, Martinez de Tejada B, Bertisch B, Fehr J, Grawe C, Scheibner K, Rickenbach M, Hoesli I, Thorne C; for the European Collaborative Study in EuroCoord and the Swiss Mother & Child HIV Cohort Study., J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2013 Jul 9. [Epub ahead of print]

Introduction:  Most national guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Europe updated between 2001 and 2010 recommend vaginal deliveries for women with undetectable or very low viral load (VL). Our aim was to explore the impact of these new guidelines on the rates of vaginal deliveries among HIV-positive women in Europe.

Methods: In a pooled analysis of data on HIV-positive pregnant women enrolled in the Swiss Mother & Child HIV Cohort Study and the European Collaborative Study 2000 to 2010, deliveries were classified as occurring pre-or post-publication of national guidelines recommending vaginal delivery.

Results: Overall, 2 663 women with 3 013 deliveries were included from 10 countries; 28% women were diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy. Combination antiretroviral therapy was used in most pregnancies (2 020, 73%), starting during the first or second trimester in 78% and during the third trimester in 22%; in 25% pregnancies, the woman conceived on combination antiretroviral therapy. Overall, in 86% pregnancies, a VL < 400 copies per milliliter was achieved before delivery. The proportion of vaginal deliveries increased from 17% (414/2 377) before the change in guidelines to 52% (313/600) after; elective Caesarean section rates decreased from 65% to 27%. The proportion of women with undetectable VL having a Caesarean section was 55% after implementation of new guidelines. We observed a decrease of late preterm deliveries from 16% (377/2 354) before to 7% (42/599) after the change in guidelines (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: There are still missed opportunities for women with HIV to fully suppress their VL and to deliver vaginally in Europe.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: In 1999, following a randomised controlled trial showing a lower risk of vertical HIV transmission among babies delivered by elective Caesarean section, pregnant women with HIV were advised to deliver by elective Caesarean section where this option was available to them. In the last decade, accumulating observational data suggested that women taking combination ART with suppressed viral load who delivered vaginally were at very low risk of vertical transmission. This led to revised guidelines allowing vaginal delivery for women with suppressed viral load on combination ART.

This analysis of European data (with largest numbers contributed by Italy, Belgium and Switzerland) shows the increasing number of women having vaginal deliveries over the last decade. However, a substantial proportion of women had unsuppressed viral load at the time of delivery, and some received no ART prior to delivery, suggesting the need to engage pregnant women with HIV in care earlier.  In addition, the data suggest that more women who have suppressed viral load could safely undergo vaginal delivery.  The proportion of infants acquiring HIV infection in the period after introduction of guidelines allowing vaginal delivery was 0.6%, which is lower than 1.6% prior to the guideline change but suggests that further efforts are required to ensure that all children in Europe are born HIV-free.

Europe
  • share
0 comments.

Better virological outcomes with efavirenz compared to nevirapine

Outcomes for efavirenz versus nevirapine-containing regimens for treatment of HIV-1 infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Pillay P, Ford N, Shubber Z, Ferrand RA., PLoS One. 2013 Jul 22;8(7):e68995. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0068995. Print 2013

Introduction: There is conflicting evidence and practice regarding the use of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Methods: We systematically reviewed virological outcomes in HIV-1 infected, treatment-naive patients on regimens containing EFV versus NVP from randomised trials and observational cohort studies. Data sources include PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and conference proceedings of the International AIDS Society, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, between 1996 to May 2013. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals were synthesized using random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) statistic, and subgroup analyses performed to assess the potential influence of study design, duration of follow up, location, and tuberculosis treatment. Sensitivity analyses explored the potential influence of different dosages of NVP and different viral load thresholds.

Results: Of 5011 citations retrieved, 38 reports of studies comprising 114 391 patients were included for review. EFV was significantly less likely than NVP to lead to virologic failure in both trials (RR 0.85 [0.73-0.99] I(2) = 0%) and observational studies (RR 0.65 [0.59-0.71] I(2) = 54%). EFV was more likely to achieve virologic success than NVP, though marginally significant, in both randomised controlled trials (RR 1.04 [1.00-1.08] I(2) = 0%) and observational studies (RR 1.06 [1.00-1.12] I(2) = 68%).

Conclusion: EFV-based first line ART is significantly less likely to lead to virologic failure compared to NVP-based ART. This finding supports the use of EFV as the preferred NNRTI in first-line treatment regimen for HIV treatment, particularly in resource limited settings.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Efavirenz and nevirapine are key antiretroviral agents, particularly in resource-limited settings. Nevirapine has been widely used, for reasons including safety during pregnancy and lower cost, despite lower potency and a higher risk of hepatotoxicity and severe allergic reactions, than with efavirenz. This article summarizes data on virological outcomes from clinical trials and observational cohort studies comparing efavirenz and nevirapine. The finding that efavirenz is associated with slightly better virological outcomes is not surprising but it is valuable to have the available data summarised. The result, along with recent recommendations allowing efavirenz to be taken throughout pregnancy, and price reductions, supports the move towards efavirenz-based fixed drug combinations as first-line antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited settings.

  • share
0 comments.

Declining prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in ART-exposed individuals in Western Europe

Declining prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in antiretroviral treatment-exposed individuals in Western Europe.

De Luca A, Dunn D, Zazzi M, Camacho R, Torti C, Fanti I et al. J Infect Dis. 2013 Apr 15;207(8):1216-20. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jit017. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

HIV-1 drug resistance represents a major obstacle to infection and disease control. This retrospective study analyzes trends and determinants of resistance in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-exposed individuals across 7 countries in Europe. Of 20 323 cases, 80% carried at least one resistance mutation: these declined from 81% in 1997 to 71% in 2008. Predicted extensive 3-class resistance was rare (3.2% considering the cumulative genotype) and peaked at 4.5% in 2005, decreasing thereafter. The proportion of cases exhausting available drug options dropped from 32% in 2000 to 1% in 2008. Reduced risk of resistance over calendar years was confirmed by multivariable analysis.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Acquired drug resistance to antiretroviral therapy emerges in the context of incomplete viral suppression and drug-pressure. This retrospective cohort comprised clinical data and genotypes, taken as part of routine clinical practice, on ART-experienced patients managed in treatment programmes in seven countries in Europe (1997-2008). The prevalence of drug resistance mutations declined over this time period (all drug classes). Based on cumulative genotypes, the prevalence of extensive resistance to three drug classes (NRTI, NNRTI and major PI) was rare (3.2% in 2008) and only 1% of patients in 2008 had exhausted all available drug options. As the authors comment in the discussion, resistance tests were not part of routine clinical practice in the early part of this cohort. Selection bias could therefore partly explain the decline in prevalence. However, this study demonstrates that given access to all available ART regimens, regular viral load monitoring and an early switch strategy for patients with virological failure, even in cohorts with extensive ART experience (>50% had prior exposure to mono- or dual-NRTI therapy) the risk of triple class resistance is low. 

Europe
  • share
0 comments.

If approved, once-daily dolutegravir could form part of an effective new option for treatment of HIV-1 in treatment-naive patients

Once-daily dolutegravir versus raltegravir in antiretroviral-naive adults with HIV-1 infection: 48 week results from the randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority SPRING-2 study.

Raffi F, Rachlis A, Stellbrink HJ, Hardy WD, Torti C, Orkin C, et al. SPRING-2 Study Group. Lancet. 2013 Mar 2;381(9868):735-43. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61853-4. Epub 2013 Jan 8.

BACKGROUND: Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) is a once-daily HIV integrase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity and a favourable safety profile. We compared dolutegravir with HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir, as initial treatment for adults with HIV-1.

METHODS: SPRING-2 is a 96 week, phase 3, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, non-inferiority study that began on Oct 19, 2010, at 100 sites in Canada, USA, Australia, and Europe. Treatment-naive adults (aged ≥ 18 years) with HIV-1 infection and HIV-1 RNA concentrations of 1000 copies per mL or greater were randomly assigned (1:1) via a computer-generated randomisation sequence to receive either dolutegravir (50 mg once daily) or raltegravir (400 mg twice daily). Study drugs were given with coformulated tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine. Randomisation was stratified by screening HIV-1 RNA (≤ 100,000 copies per mL or >100,000 copies per mL) and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone. Investigators were not masked to HIV-1 RNA results before randomisation. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL at 48 weeks, with a 10% non-inferiority margin. Main secondary endpoints were changes from baseline in CD4 cell counts, incidence and severity of adverse events, changes in laboratory parameters, and genotypic or phenotypic evidence of resistance. Our primary analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01227824.

FINDINGS: 411 patients were randomly allocated to receive dolutegravir and 411 to receive raltegravir and received at least one dose of study drug. At 48 weeks, 361 (88%) patients in the dolutegravir group achieved an HIV-1 RNA value of less than 50 copies per mL compared with 351 (85%) in the raltegravir group (adjusted difference 2·5%; 95% CI -2·2 to 7·1). Adverse events were similar between treatment groups. The most common events were nausea (59 [14%] patients in the dolutegravir group vs 53 [13%] in the raltegravir group), headache (51 [12%] vs 48 [12%]), nasopharyngitis (46 [11%] vs 48 [12%]), and diarrhoea (47 [11%] in each group). Few patients had drug-related serious adverse events (three [<1%] vs five [1%]), and few had adverse events leading to discontinuation (ten [2%] vs seven [2%] in each group). CD4 cell counts increased from baseline to week 48 in both treatment groups by a median of 230 cells per μL. Rates of graded laboratory toxic effects were similar. We noted no evidence of treatment-emergent resistance in patients with virological failure on dolutegravir, whereas of the patients with virologic failure who received raltegravir, one (6%) had integrase treatment-emergent resistance and four (21%) had nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors treatment-emergent resistance.

INTERPRETATION: The non-inferior efficacy and similar safety profile of dolutegravir compared with raltegravir means that if approved, combination treatment with once-daily dolutegravir and fixed-dose nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors would be an effective new option for treatment of HIV-1 in treatment-naive patients.

FUNDING: ViiV Healthcare.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Integrase inhibitors are a novel and potent class of antiretroviral drug, however their role in first line therapy has yet to be clearly defined. Use of the two FDA approved integrase inhibitors, raltegravir and elvitegravir, has been limited by the need for twice-daily dosing and the requirement for boosting respectively. Dolutegravir, evaluated in the SPRING-2 study, has a very favourable pharmacokinetic profile which allows once-daily dosing without the need for boosting. Planned co-formulation with ABC/3TC further increases the attractiveness of dolutegravir as a treatment option in treatment-naive patients. In this head to head study dolutegravir was non-inferior to raltegravir in terms of the primary endpoint (viral suppression at 48 weeks), and was well tolerated. Additionally, no evidence of drug resistance was found in the small number of patients with virological failure on dolutegravir treatment, in keeping with prior evidence suggesting a high genetic barrier to resistance. But as the accompanying Lancet editorial noted, some important questions remain unanswered. The study population of predominantly white males and the fact that most study participants had non-advanced disease, with a median baseline CD4 count of 359 cells/µL, makes extrapolation of the results to the areas of the world with the highest disease burdens difficult. Further studies in populations more representative of the global HIV epidemic are needed, but the results of the SPRING study suggest that dolutegravir will be a useful addition to the ART repertoire.

Europe, Northern America, Oceania
  • share
0 comments.