Articles tagged as "Ecuador"

Negative police activity a structural determinant of HIV

Policing practices as a structural determinant for HIV among sex workers: a systematic review of empirical findings.

Footer KH, Silberzahn BE, Tormohlen KN, Sherman SG. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Jul 18;19(4 Suppl 3):20883. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.4.20883. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: Sex workers are disproportionately infected with HIV worldwide. Significant focus has been placed on understanding the structural determinants of HIV and designing related interventions. Although there is growing international evidence that policing is an important structural HIV determinant among sex workers, the evidence has not been systematically reviewed.

Methods: We conducted a systematic review of quantitative studies to examine the effects of policing on HIV and STI infection and HIV-related outcomes (condom use; syringe use; number of clients; HIV/STI testing and access) among cis and trans women sex workers. Databases included PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Sociological Abstracts, Popline, Global Health (OVID), Web of Science, IBSS, IndMed and WHOLIS. We searched for studies that included police practices as an exposure for HIV or STI infection or HIV-related outcomes.

Results: Of the 137 peer-reviewed articles identified for full text review, 14 were included, representing sex workers' experiences with police across five settings. Arrest was the most commonly explored measure with between 6 and 45% of sex workers reporting having ever been arrested. Sexual coercion was observed between 3 and 37% of the time and police extortion between 12 and 28% across studies. Half the studies used a single measure to capture police behaviours. Studies predominantly focused on "extra-legal policing practices," with insufficient attention to the role of "legal enforcement activities". All studies found an association between police behaviours and HIV or STI infection, or a related risk behaviour.

Conclusions: The review points to a small body of evidence that confirms policing practices as an important structural HIV determinant for sex workers, but studies lack generalizability with respect to identifying those police behaviours most relevant to women's HIV risk environment.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: The paper reports on a systematic review, which explored how quantitative research to date has operationalized the measurement of law enforcement practices as a structural determinant of HIV for female (including transgender) sex workers. The authors reviewed 14 quantitative studies using policing practices as a micro-structural determinant for HIV risk among sex workers. They found substantial heterogeneity in both the police measures and the health outcomes considered by the different studies. Overall, the studies found that police measures were regularly reported by sex workers, with an average of 34% of sex workers experiencing at least one police measure. They found that arrest was the most commonly explored measure in the studies. Following this, sexual coercion and then police extortion were important.

The studies reported that these police measures were consistently, positively, associated with either HIV infection or STI symptoms or with inconsistent condom use. Having ever been arrested, sexual coercion, police extortion, and syringe confiscation was associated with an increased risk of acquiring an HIV infection or an STI. These measures, and displacement by the police, were also associated with inconsistent condom use. Intervening on interactions between sex workers and the police reduced HIV risk over the time of the programme.

The authors argue that these findings point to the potentially pivotal role that the police have as a structural determinant for HIV in vulnerable populations. However, they argue that nearly all the papers identified in this review fail to take account of the complexities of the risk environment in which law enforcement occurs. The authors thus suggest a need for better measures for legal and extra-legal enforcement practices as mechanisms through which sex workers’ HIV risk is mediated.

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America
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Oral PrEP reduces risk of HIV and does not result in riskier sex

Effectiveness and safety of oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for all populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Fonner VA, Dalglish SL, Kennedy CE, Baggaley R, O'Reilly K R, Koechlin FM, Rodolph M, Hodges-Mameletzis I, Grant RM. AIDS. 2016 May 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) offers a promising new approach to HIV prevention. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the evidence for use of oral PrEP containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) as an additional HIV prevention strategy in populations at substantial risk for HIV based on HIV acquisition, adverse events, drug resistance, sexual behavior, and reproductive health outcomes.

Design: Rigorous systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: A comprehensive search strategy reviewed three electronic databases and conference abstracts through April 2015. Pooled effect estimates were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis.

Results: Eighteen studies were included, comprising data from 39 articles and six conference abstracts. Across populations and PrEP regimens, PrEP significantly reduced the risk of HIV acquisition compared to placebo. Trials with PrEP use >70% demonstrated the highest PrEP effectiveness (RR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.21-0.45, p < 0.001) compared to placebo. Trials with low PrEP use did not show a significantly protective effect. Adverse events were similar between PrEP and placebo groups. More cases of drug-resistant HIV infection were found among PrEP users who initiated PrEP while acutely HIV-infected, but incidence of acquiring drug-resistant HIV during PrEP use was low. Studies consistently found no association between PrEP use and changes in sexual risk behavior. PrEP was not associated with increased pregnancy-related adverse events or hormonal contraception effectiveness.

Conclusion: PrEP is protective against HIV infection across populations, presents few significant safety risks, and no evidence of behavioral risk compensation. The effective and cost-effective use of PrEP will require development of best practices for fostering uptake and adherence among people at substantial HIV-risk.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: This systematic review is the first to aggregate data from across oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) studies, including randomized control trials and observational studies, to present clear evidence on the effectiveness of oral PrEP use. The findings confirm that oral PrEP significantly reduces the risk of acquiring HIV if taken consistently and correctly across populations, countries, and most age groups. Differences in efficacy directly correlate with adherence, which accounts for the lower efficacy seen in some subgroups. Perhaps two of the most compelling analyses presented in this paper relate to resistance and behavioural disinhibition. The risk of resistance was shown to be quite low, and study participants exhibiting resistant HIV either enrolled in the studies during an acute infection stage or acquired resistant strains during the course of the research. Regarding behavioural disinhibition, indicators measured such as rates of sexually transmitted infections revealed that PrEP use in the efficacy trials was not associated with behavioural disinhibition and in some studies, resulted in even safer sexual behaviour than what was reported at baseline. Recently completed demonstration projects have reported increased rates of STIs among gay men and other men who have sex with men. However, in the open-label extensions included in this review, where counselling was more intensive, safer sex practices were maintained, thus suggesting that counselling can be effective in preventing behavioural disinhibition. 

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Violence experience of women living with HIV: a global study

Violence. Enough already: findings from a global participatory survey among women living with HIV.

Orza L, Bewley S, Chung C, Crone ET, Nagadya H, Vazquez M, Welbourn A. J Int AIDS Soc. 2015 Dec 1;18(6 Suppl 5):20285. doi: 10.7448/IAS.18.6.20285. eCollection 2015.

Introduction: Women living with HIV are vulnerable to gender-based violence (GBV) before and after diagnosis, in multiple settings. This study's aim was to explore how GBV is experienced by women living with HIV, how this affects women's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and human rights (HR), and the implications for policymakers.

Methods: A community-based, participatory, user-led, mixed-methods study was conducted, with women living with HIV from key affected populations. Simple descriptive frequencies were used for quantitative data. Thematic coding of open qualitative responses was performed and validated with key respondents.

Results: In total, 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries participated in the study. Eighty-nine percent of 480 respondents to an optional section on GBV reported having experienced or feared violence, either before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. GBV reporting was higher after HIV diagnosis (intimate partner, family/neighbours, community and health settings). Women described a complex and iterative relationship between GBV and HIV occurring throughout their lives, including breaches of confidentiality and lack of SRH choice in healthcare settings, forced/coerced treatments, HR abuses, moralistic and judgemental attitudes (including towards women from key populations), and fear of losing child custody. Respondents recommended healthcare practitioners and policymakers address stigma and discrimination, training, awareness-raising, and HR abuses in healthcare settings.

Conclusions: Respondents reported increased GBV with partners and in families, communities and healthcare settings after their HIV diagnosis and across the life-cycle. Measures of GBV must be sought and monitored, particularly within healthcare settings that should be safe. Respondents offered policymakers a comprehensive range of recommendations to achieve their SRH and HR goals. Global guidance documents and policies are more likely to succeed for the end-users if lived experiences are used.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Violence against women who are living with HIV is common globally. This paper reports on a study of 832 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in an online survey, recruited through a non-random snowball sampling model. The survey comprised quantitative and qualitative (free text) components. Participants included women who had ever or were currently using injection drugs (14%), who had ever or were currently selling sex (14%), and who had ever or were currently homeless (14%). Lifetime experience of violence among respondents was high (86%). Perpetrators included: intimate partner (59%), family member / neighbour (45%), community member (53%), health care workers (53%) and police, military, prison or detention services (17%). Findings suggest that violence is not a one off occurrence and cannot easily be packaged as a cause or a consequence of HIV. Instead violence occurs throughout women’s lives, takes multiple forms, and has a complex and iterative relationship with HIV.

The study population did not represent all women living with HIV, and was biased towards women with internet access who have an activist interest. Nonetheless, the study provides further evidence of the breadth and frequency of gender based violence experienced by women living with HIV. Key recommendations for policy makers include training of health care workers working in sexual and reproductive services to offer non-discriminatory services to women living with HIV and to effectively respond to disclosures of gender based violence (such as intimate partner violence) as part of the package of care.

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Togo, Transdniestria, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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Men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of the evidence

Emerging themes for sensitivity training modules of African healthcare workers attending to men who have sex with men: a systematic review.

Dijkstra M, van der Elst EM, Micheni M, Gichuru E, Musyoki H, Duby Z, Lange JM, Graham SM, Sanders EJ. Int Health. 2015 May;7(3):151-162. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Sensitivity training of front-line African health care workers (HCWs) attending to men who have sex with men (MSM) is actively promoted through national HIV prevention programming in Kenya. Over 970 Kenyan-based HCWs have completed an eight-modular online training free of charge (http://www.marps-africa.org) since its creation in 2011. Before updating these modules, we performed a systematic review of published literature of MSM studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) in the period 2011-2014, to investigate if recent studies provided: important new knowledge currently not addressed in existing online modules; contested information of existing module topics; or added depth to topics covered already. We used learning objectives of the eight existing modules to categorise data from the literature. If data could not be categorised, new modules were suggested. Our review identified 142 MSM studies with data from sSA, including 34 studies requiring module updates, one study contesting current content, and 107 studies reinforcing existing module content. ART adherence and community engagement were identified as new modules. Recent MSM studies conducted in sSA provided new knowledge, contested existing information, and identified new areas of MSM service needs currently unaddressed in the online training.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Same sex practices remain criminalised in sub-Saharan Africa. Gay men and other men who have sex with men face stigma, discrimination, harassment and arrest. Health care workers frequently have no training on issues affecting gay men and other men who have sex with men and are ill-prepared to work sensitively with them. Together these can deter these men from accessing health care and HIV/STI services, increasing their risk of HIV and other poor health outcomes.

This study conducted a systematic review of gay men and other men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa. The findings were used to update an on-line training programme for health care workers in Kenya. This previously comprised modules on i) men who have sex with men and HIV in Africa ii) homophobia: stigma and its effects; iii) sexual identity, coming out and disclosure; iv) anal sex and common sexual practices; v) HIV and STIs; vi) condom and lubricant use; vii) mental health: anxiety, depression and substance use; and viii) risk-reduction counselling. The review updated the training programme with new evidence and two new modules were introduced: ix) ART adherence; and x) community engagement.

Health care workers play a crucial role in reducing stigma and discrimination facing gay men and other men who have sex with men. This systematic review provided a valuable step in updating an important, accessible training programme. Reducing homoprejudice and ensuring health care workers have accurate and up-to-date knowledge are key to improving service uptake by gay men and other men who have sex with men.

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Assessing risk behaviour and uptake of HIV care using an online network among MSM in Latin America

Engagement in HIV care and sexual transmission risk behavior among men who have sex with men using online social/sexual networking in Latin America.

Magidson JF, Biello KB, Safren SA, Rosenberger JG, Novak DS, Mayer KH, Mimiaga MJ. AIDS Care. 2015 Mar 4:1-8. [Epub ahead of print]

HIV/AIDS in Latin America is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, accurate estimates of engagement in HIV care in this population can be difficult to ascertain because many do not self-identify as MSM. Given evidence of decreased HIV transmissibility in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, identifying individuals not in care who are engaging in HIV transmission risk behavior is crucial for secondary prevention. Primary aims of this study were to examine engagement in care from testing to ART adherence among MSM using online social/sexual networking across Latin America, and whether individuals not in care at each step reported greater sexual transmission risk behavior than those in care. In the overall sample (n = 28 779), approximately 75% reported ever being tested for HIV, and 9% reported having received an HIV diagnosis. Among known HIV-infected individuals, 20% reported not being in care, 30% reported not taking ART, and 55% reported less than 100% ART adherence. Over one-third of HIV-infected individuals reported sexual HIV transmission risk behavior, defined as unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with a male partner of different/unknown HIV serostatus in the past three months. HIV-infected individuals not engaged in care more often reported UAI compared to those in care (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01-1.66). Although not statistically significant, HIV-infected individuals not on ART more often reported UAI compared to those on ART (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 0.94-1.47). Individuals who reported less than 100% ART adherence more often reported UAI compared to individuals with 100% adherence (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.26-1.90). Findings demonstrate that a substantial portion of HIV-infected MSM in Latin America who are likely not virologically suppressed from lack of ART use or adherence report sexual HIV transmission risk. Tailoring secondary HIV prevention for MSM in Latin America who are not in HIV care or adherent to ART may be warranted.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: The prevalence of HIV among gay men and other men who have sex with men in Latin America and the Caribbean is among the highest in the world. Stigma and discrimination towards gay men and other men who have sex with men  in these settings mean that many do not reveal their sexual preference, do not acknowledge their HIV risk, and do not access HIV diagnosis, care and treatment. This paper describes a large cross-sectional study of almost 30 000 gay men and other men who have sex with men from 17 countries in Latin America, recruited via a social/sexual networking website that they had recently used. The study highlights the substantial difficulty in fully engaging gay men and other men who have sex with men living with HIV, into treatment and care services in this region. This in turn contributes to high HIV prevalence and incidence, through unsafe sexual behaviour and unsuppressed viral load in gay men and other men who have sex with men living with HIV. The authors note that the highest proportion of participants receiving HIV care lived in Brazil, where national efforts have been made to reduce homophobia and to include gay men and other men who have sex with men in HIV prevention initiatives. Similar efforts are required in other Latin American countries if their high levels of HIV transmission in these communities, are to be reduced. This includes innovative methods such as using social networking sites as a platform for delivering programmes.  

Latin America
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Feelings of regret after HIV status disclosure: prevalence, trends, and determinants

Was it a mistake to tell others that you are infected with HIV?: factors associated with regret following HIV disclosure among people living with HIV in five countries (Mali, Morocco, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador and Romania). Results from a community-based research.

Henry E, Bernier A, Lazar F, Matamba G, Loukid M, Bonifaz C, Diop S, Otis J, Préau M; The Partages study group. AIDS Behav. 2014 Dec 23. [Epub ahead of print]

This study examined regret following HIV serostatus disclosure and associated factors in under-investigated contexts (Mali, Morocco, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador and Romania). A community-based cross-sectional study was implemented by a mixed consortium [researchers/community-based organizations (CBO)]. Trained CBO members interviewed 1500 PLHIV in contact with CBOs using a 125-item questionnaire. A weighted multivariate logistic regression was performed. Among the 1212 participants included in the analysis, 290 (23.9 %) declared that disclosure was a mistake. Female gender, percentage of PLHIV's network knowing about one's seropositivity from a third party, having suffered rejection after disclosure, having suffered HIV-based discrimination at work, perceived seriousness of infection score, daily loneliness, property index and self-esteem score were independently associated with regret. Discrimination, as well as individual characteristics and skills may affect the disclosure experience. Interventions aiming at improving PLHIV skills and reducing their social isolation may facilitate the disclosure process and avoid negative consequences.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Anticipated and perceived consequences of disclosing one’s HIV status are recognized as important drivers for HIV disclosure. This community-based study looked at the experience of disclosing one’s HIV status, and the emotions that were associated with disclosure. The study was nested within a larger cross-sectional research project. 1500 people living with HIV (PLHIV) from Ecuador, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Mali, Romania, and Morocco were included in the study. Respondents were asked ‘Was it a mistake to tell others that you are infected with HIV?’ and to answer either ‘yes’ or ‘no.' Participants also responded to questions about the process of disclosure. Among people that had disclosed their status, some 23.9% said that it was a mistake to do so. Almost 40% of participants said that a person in their network learned about their status from a third party. More than 17% of participants responded that they faced rejection and eight percent of participants suffered discrimination at work following disclosure. But this varied greatly across countries. Factors associated with feeling regret after disclosing one’s status included being a female, perceived seriousness of HIV infection, and feeling lonely every day. This study highlights the fact that status disclosure can be emotional and stressful for people living with HIV. This suggests that people living with HIV must weigh the costs and benefits of disclosure before doing so and programmes that empower them to make informed decisions about disclosure may be beneficial. 

Africa, Europe, Latin America
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Diagnosis of syphilis as an entry point for PrEP initiation among men who have sex with men

Syphilis predicts HIV incidence among men and transgender women who have sex with men in a preexposure prophylaxis trial.

Solomon MM, Mayer KH, Glidden DV, Liu AY, McMahan VM, Guanira JV, Chariyalertsak S, Fernandez T, Grant RM, iPrEx Study Team. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Oct;59(7):1020-6. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciu450. Epub 2014 Jun 13.

Background: Syphilis infection may potentiate transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to determine the extent to which HIV acquisition was associated with syphilis infection within an HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial and whether emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF) modified that association.

Methods: The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) study randomly assigned 2499 HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men (MSM) to receive oral daily FTC/TDF or placebo. Syphilis prevalence at screening and incidence during follow-up were measured. Hazard ratios for the effect of incident syphilis on HIV acquisition were calculated. The effect of FTC/TDF on incident syphilis and HIV acquisition was assessed.

Results: Of 2499 individuals, 360 (14.4%) had a positive rapid plasma reagin test at screening; 333 (92.5%) had a positive confirmatory test, which did not differ between the arms (FTC/TDF vs placebo, P = .81). The overall syphilis incidence during the trial was 7.3 cases per 100 person-years. There was no difference in syphilis incidence between the study arms (7.8 cases per 100 person-years for FTC/TDF vs 6.8 cases per 100 person-years for placebo, P = .304). HIV incidence varied by incident syphilis (2.8 cases per 100 person-years for no syphilis vs 8.0 cases per 100 person-years for incident syphilis), reflecting a hazard ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.6-4.4; P < .001). There was no evidence for interaction between randomization to the FTC/TDF arm and incident syphilis on HIV incidence.

Conclusions: In HIV-seronegative MSM, syphilis infection was associated with HIV acquisition in this PrEP trial; a syphilis diagnosis should prompt providers to offer PrEP unless otherwise contraindicated.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) trial and other recent trials have illustrated clearly that preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF) dramatically reduces the risk of HIV when used correctly and consistently. There is current discussion about the practical implications of these findings. This paper confirms a strong association between incident syphilis and HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM), and illustrates that syphilis did not attenuate the protective benefit of FTC/TDF against HIV. Syphilis continues to be prevalent among MSM in many settings, and the screening prevalence of 13% in this study is consistent with global estimates. These results highlight that individuals with syphilis are a key group for HIV acquisition. The results suggest that a new diagnosis of syphilis is an important opportunity for PrEP initiation, unless contraindications are present. This would be in addition to immediate syphilis treatment, and treatment for sexual partners. 

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Counting and classifying global deaths

Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

Murray CJ, Ortblad KF, Guinovart C, et al. Lancet. 2014 Sep 13;384(9947):1005-70. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60844-8. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Background: The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach to disease estimation for between 1990 and 2013, and an opportunity to assess whether accelerated progress has occurred since the Millennium Declaration.

Methods: To estimate incidence and mortality for HIV, we used the UNAIDS Spectrum model appropriately modified based on a systematic review of available studies of mortality with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). For concentrated epidemics, we calibrated Spectrum models to fit vital registration data corrected for misclassification of HIV deaths. In generalised epidemics, we minimised a loss function to select epidemic curves most consistent with prevalence data and demographic data for all-cause mortality. We analysed counterfactual scenarios for HIV to assess years of life saved through prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and ART. For tuberculosis, we analysed vital registration and verbal autopsy data to estimate mortality using cause of death ensemble modelling. We analysed data for corrected case-notifications, expert opinions on the case-detection rate, prevalence surveys, and estimated cause-specific mortality using Bayesian meta-regression to generate consistent trends in all parameters. We analysed malaria mortality and incidence using an updated cause of death database, a systematic analysis of verbal autopsy validation studies for malaria, and recent studies (2010-13) of incidence, drug resistance, and coverage of insecticide-treated bednets.

Findings: Globally in 2013, there were 1.8 million new HIV infections (95% uncertainty interval 1.7 million to 2.1 million), 29.2 million prevalent HIV cases (28.1 to 31.7), and 1.3 million HIV deaths (1.3 to 1.5). At the peak of the epidemic in 2005, HIV caused 1.7 million deaths (1.6 million to 1.9 million). Concentrated epidemics in Latin America and eastern Europe are substantially smaller than previously estimated. Through interventions including PMTCT and ART, 19.1 million life-years (16.6 million to 21.5 million) have been saved, 70.3% (65.4 to 76.1) in developing countries. From 2000 to 2011, the ratio of development assistance for health for HIV to years of life saved through intervention was US$ 4498 in developing countries. Including in HIV-positive individuals, all-form tuberculosis incidence was 7.5 million (7.4 million to 7.7 million), prevalence was 11.9 million (11.6 million to 12.2 million), and number of deaths was 1.4 million (1.3 million to 1.5 million) in 2013. In the same year and in only individuals who were HIV-negative, all-form tuberculosis incidence was 7.1 million (6.9 million to 7.3 million), prevalence was 11.2 million (10.8 million to 11.6 million), and number of deaths was 1.3 million (1.2 million to 1.4 million). Annualised rates of change (ARC) for incidence, prevalence, and death became negative after 2000. Tuberculosis in HIV-negative individuals disproportionately occurs in men and boys (versus women and girls); 64.0% of cases (63.6 to 64.3) and 64.7% of deaths (60.8 to 70.3). Globally, malaria cases and deaths grew rapidly from 1990 reaching a peak of 232 million cases (143 million to 387 million) in 2003 and 1.2 million deaths (1.1 million to 1.4 million) in 2004. Since 2004, child deaths from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa have decreased by 31.5% (15.7 to 44.1). Outside of Africa, malaria mortality has been steadily decreasing since 1990.

Interpretation: Our estimates of the number of people living with HIV are 18.7% smaller than UNAIDS's estimates in 2012. The number of people living with malaria is larger than estimated by WHO. The number of people living with HIV, tuberculosis, or malaria have all decreased since 2000. At the global level, upward trends for malaria and HIV deaths have been reversed and declines in tuberculosis deaths have accelerated. 101 countries (74 of which are developing) still have increasing HIV incidence. Substantial progress since the Millennium Declaration is an encouraging sign of the effect of global action.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study uses standard methods to compare and track over time national distributions of deaths by cause, and the prevalence of disease and disability.  This detailed report focuses on HIV, TB and Malaria. It presents regional summaries of incidence, prevalence and mortality rates, and national estimates of the number of male and female deaths and new infections. Point estimates are shown for 2013, and annualised rates of change for 1990-2000 and 2000-2013. These highlight the contrasting trends in disease impact before and after the formulation of the Millennium Development Goal to combat these diseases.  The global peak of HIV mortality occurred in 2005, but regional annualised rates of change for 2000-2013 indicate that HIV deaths are still increasing significantly in east Asia, southern Africa, and most rapidly in eastern Europe.

The GBD 2013 global estimates of new infections and deaths agree closely with the corresponding estimates made by UNAIDS. But there are significant differences in the respective estimates of the number of people currently living with HIV (UNAIDS estimates are some 18% higher), and historical trends in AIDS deaths, with UNAIDS judging that the recent fall has been steeper. These differences are attributed primarily to methods used in the GBD study to ensure that the sum of deaths from specific causes fits the estimated all cause total, and to varying assumptions about historical survival patterns following HIV infection. 

It may be worthwhile to look at a comment by Michel Sidibé, Mark Dybul, and Deborah Birx in the Lancet on MDG 6 and beyond: from halting and reversing AIDS to ending the epidemic which refers to this study.

Epidemiology
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palestinian Territory, Occupied, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe
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Identifying people most likely to benefit from HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis

HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis in men who have sex with men and transgender women: a secondary analysis of a phase 3 randomised controlled efficacy trial.

Buchbinder SP, Glidden DV, Liu AY, McMahan V, Guanira JV, Mayer KH, Goicochea P, Grant RM. Lancet Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;14(6):468-75. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(14)70025-8. Epub 2014 Mar 7.

Background: For maximum effect pre-exposure prophylaxis should be targeted to the subpopulations that account for the largest proportion of infections (population-attributable fraction [PAF]) and for whom the number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent infection is lowest. We aimed to estimate the PAF and NNT of participants in the iPrEx (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Initiative) trial.

Methods: The iPrEx study was a randomised controlled efficacy trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis with coformulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine in 2 499 men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women. Participants aged 18 years or older who were male at birth were enrolled from 11 trial sites in Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and the USA. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either a pill with active pre-exposure prophylaxis or placebo, taken daily. We calculated the association between demographic and risk behaviour during screening and subsequent seroconversion among placebo recipients using a Poisson model, and we calculated the PAF and NNT for risk behaviour subgroups..

Findings: Patients were enrolled between July 10, 2007, and Dec 17, 2009, and were followed up until Nov 21, 2010. Of the 2 499 MSM and transgender women in the iPrEx trial, 1 251 were assigned to pre-exposure prophylaxis and 1 248 to placebo. 83 of 1 248 patients in the placebo group became infected with HIV during follow-up. Participants reporting receptive anal intercourse without a condom seroconverted significantly more often than those reporting no anal sex without a condom (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 5.11, 95% CI 1.55-16.79). The overall PAF for MSM and transgender women reporting receptive anal intercourse without a condom was 64% (prevalence 60%). Most of this risk came from receptive anal intercourse without a condom with partners with unknown serostatus (PAF 53%, prevalence 54%, AHR 4.76, 95% CI 1.44-15.71); by contrast, the PAF for receptive anal intercourse without a condom with an HIV-positive partner was 1% (prevalence 1%, AHR 7.11, 95% CI 0.70-72.75). The overall NNT per year for the cohort was 62 (95% CI 44-147). NNTs were lowest for MSM and transgender women self-reporting receptive anal intercourse without a condom (NNT 36), cocaine use (12), or a sexually transmitted infection (41). Having one partner and insertive anal sex without a condom had the highest NNTs (100 and 77, respectively).

Interpretation: Pre-exposure prophylaxis may be most effective at a population level if targeted toward MSM and transgender women who report receptive anal intercourse without a condom, even if they perceive their partners to be HIV negative. Substance use history and testing for STIs should also inform individual decisions to start pre-exposure prophylaxis. Consideration of the PAF and NNT can aid in discussion of the benefits and risks of pre-exposure prophylaxis with MSM and transgender women.

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Editor’s notes: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP) is the only biomedical prevention activity shown to be effective against acquisition of HIV in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women, in a randomised controlled trial. The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and WHO recommend PreP for MSM and transgender women at high risk of HIV infection. However, many health care providers have difficulty assessing risk and neither the CDC nor WHO has yet provided specific behavioural criteria for when to use pre-exposure prophylaxis. The purpose of this study was to identify subpopulations of participants within the iPrEx trial, for whom PreP may have the largest effect on HIV prevention. The findings suggest that MSM and transgender women can be screened for potential eligibility for PreP in clinical practice by asking about recent receptive anal intercourse without a condom. Substance use history and testing for sexually transmitted infections should also be considered, to inform individual decisions to start pre-exposure prophylaxis.

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Poor accuracy of self-reported adherence to PrEP versus drug detection in many settings

Study product adherence measurement in the iPrEx placebo-controlled trial: concordance with drug detection.

Amico KR, Marcus JL, McMahan V, Liu A, Koester KA, Goicochea P, Anderson PL, Glidden D, Guanira J, Grant R. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2014 May 21. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: To evaluate the concordance between adherence estimated by self-report (in-person interview or computer-assisted self-interview [CASI]), in-clinic pill counts, and pharmacy dispensation records and drug detection among participants in a placebo-controlled, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) HIV prevention trial (iPrEx).

Design: Cross-sectional evaluation of 510 participants who had drug concentration data and matched adherence assessments from their week-24 study visit.

Methods: Self-reported adherence collected via (1) interview and (2) CASI surveys, (3) adherence estimated by pill count, and (4) medication possession ratio (MPR) were contrasted to having a detectable level of drug concentrations (either tenofovir diphosphate [TFV-DP] or emtricitabine triphosphate [FTC-TP]) as well as to having evidence of consistent dosing (TFV-DP>/=16 fmol/10 cells), focusing on positive predictive values (PPV), overall and by research site.

Results: Overall, self-report and pharmacy records suggested high rates of product use (over 90% adherence); however, large discrepancies between these measures and drug detection were noted, which varied considerably between sites (PPV from 34% to 62%). Measures of adherence performed generally well in the US sites, but had poor accuracy in other research locations. MPR outperformed other measures but still had relatively low discrimination.

Conclusions: The sizable discrepancy between adherence measures and drug detection in certain regions highlights the potential contribution of factors that may have incentivized efforts to appear adherent. Understanding the processes driving adherence reporting in some settings, but not others, is essential for finding effective ways to increase accuracy in measurement of product use and may generalize to promotion efforts for open-label PrEP.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: This paper discusses the results of a sub-study conducted as part of the iPrEX randomised placebo-controlled trial. This trial tested the efficacy of once daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention for men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women, in several sites globally. The iPrEX study was the first PrEP efficacy study providing tenofovir-based PrEP which reported positive results. It found a 44% protection against HIV acquisition. After further analysis, researchers discovered that participants with higher adherence rates as measured by drug concentrations in the blood, achieved higher levels of protection. This finding, coupled with analyses of the other PrEP prevention trials, highlighted the need to understand why participants in the trials did not take the PrEP. The study also emphasised the need to develop optimal measures of adherence, support strategies for adherence, and strategies for delivering the programme to those who are motivated to take PrEP, for future research and implementation purposes. This sub-study specifically examined the optimal strategies for measuring adherence, and found that measures relying on self-reporting and pill counts did not reflect drug level concentrations in the blood. The discrepancies with drug levels varied across sites, with wider discrepancies found in the more resource poor settings. The findings indicate a need for qualitative research to confirm suspicions, and to further understand how best to measure adherence, and encourage it, in future HIV prevention research studies. 

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