Articles tagged as "India"

Model estimates large global burden of childhood tuberculosis infection and potentially preventable future tuberculosis disease

Burden of childhood tuberculosis in 22 high-burden countries: a mathematical modelling study.

Dodd PJ, Gardiner E, Coghlan R, Seddon JA. Lancet Glob Health. 2014 Aug;2(8):e453-9. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(14)70245-1. Epub 2014 Jul 8.

Background: Confirmation of a diagnosis of tuberculosis in children (aged <15 years) is challenging; under-reporting can result even when children do present to health services. Direct incidence estimates are unavailable, and WHO estimates build on paediatric notifications, with adjustment for incomplete surveillance by the same factor as adult notifications. We aimed to estimate the incidence of infection and disease in children, the prevalence of infection, and household exposure in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease.

Methods: Within a mechanistic mathematical model, we combined estimates of adult tuberculosis prevalence in 2010, with aspects of the natural history of paediatric tuberculosis. In a household model, we estimated household exposure and infection. We accounted for the effects of age, BCG vaccination, and HIV infection. Additionally, we tested sensitivity to key structural assumptions by repeating all analyses without variation in BCG efficacy by latitude.

Findings: The median number of children estimated to be sharing a household with an individual with infectious tuberculosis in 2010 was 15 319 701 (IQR 13 766 297-17 061 821). In 2010, the median number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in children was 7 591 759 (5 800 053-9 969 780), and 650 977 children (424 871-983 118) developed disease. Cumulative exposure meant that the median number of children with latent infection in 2010 was 53 234 854 (41 111 669-68 959 804). The model suggests that 35% (23-54) of paediatric cases of tuberculosis in the 15 countries reporting notifications by age in 2010 were detected. India is predicted to account for 27% (22-33) of the total burden of paediatric tuberculosis in the 22 countries. The predicted proportion of tuberculosis burden in children for each country correlated with incidence, varying between 4% and 21%.

Interpretation: Our model has shown that the incidence of paediatric tuberculosis is higher than the number of notifications, particularly in young children. Estimates of current household exposure and cumulative infection suggest an enormous opportunity for preventive treatment.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Estimating the burden of childhood tuberculosis has been largely neglected until recently. Children with tuberculosis rarely transmit and therefore from a control perspective, childhood tuberculosis does not notably contribute to the continuation of the tuberculosis epidemic. This modelling paper attempts to estimate the global burden of childhood tuberculosis infection and disease. Incidence estimates are made by using adult tuberculosis prevalence data to tackle the known limitations of using paediatric notification data. A second model estimates the prevalence of infection in children and household exposure, ignoring exposure outside of the household.  As with all mathematical model predictions, precision of estimates are dependent on the data used as inputs in the model. Despite these limitations, the paper draws attention to the fact that the burden of childhood tuberculosis infection and disease is significant and reflects failure of tuberculosis control in the 22 high-burden countries. The paper also highlights the fact that household contact tracing and preventive therapy in tuberculosis-exposed children could substantially reduce future tuberculosis-related morbidity.

Avoid TB deaths
Comorbidity, Epidemiology
Africa, Asia, Latin America
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Improving linkage to pre-antiretroviral therapy care and antiretroviral therapy initiation

Interventions to improve or facilitate linkage to or retention in pre-ART (HIV) care and initiation of ART in low- and middle-income settings--a systematic review.

Govindasamy D, Meghij J, Kebede Negussi E, Clare Baggaley R, Ford N, Kranzer K. J Int AIDS Soc. 2014 Aug 1;17(1):19032. doi: 10.7448/IAS.17.1.19032. eCollection 2014.

Introduction: Several approaches have been taken to reduce pre-antiretroviral therapy (ART) losses between HIV testing and ART initiation in low- and middle-income countries, but a systematic assessment of the evidence has not yet been undertaken. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the potential for interventions to improve or facilitate linkage to or retention in pre-ART care and initiation of ART in low- and middle-income settings.

Methods: An electronic search was conducted on Medline, Embase, Global Health, Web of Science and conference databases to identify studies describing interventions aimed at improving linkage to or retention in pre-ART care or initiation of ART. Additional searches were conducted to identify on-going trials on this topic, and experts in the field were contacted. An assessment of the risk of bias was conducted. Interventions were categorized according to key domains in the existing literature.

Results: A total of 11 129 potentially relevant citations were identified, of which 24 were eligible for inclusion, with the majority (n=21) from sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, 15 on-going trials were identified. The most common interventions described under key domains included: health system interventions (i.e. integration in the setting of antenatal care); patient convenience and accessibility (i.e. point-of-care CD4 count (POC) testing with immediate results, home-based ART initiation); behaviour interventions and peer support (i.e. improved communication, patient referral and education) and incentives (i.e. food support). Several interventions showed favourable outcomes: integration of care and peer supporters increased enrolment into HIV care, medical incentives increased pre-ART retention, POC CD4 testing and food incentives increased completion of ART eligibility screening and ART initiation. Most studies focused on the general adult patient population or pregnant women. The majority of published studies were observational cohort studies, subject to an unclear risk of bias.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that streamlining services to minimize patient visits, providing adequate medical and peer support, and providing incentives may decrease attrition, but the quality of the current evidence base is low. Few studies have investigated combined interventions, or assessed the impact of interventions across the HIV cascade. Results from on-going trials investigating POC CD4 count testing, patient navigation, rapid ART initiation and mobile phone technology may fill the quality of evidence gap. Further high-quality studies on key population groups are required, with interventions informed by previously reported barriers to care.

 Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: To maximise the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART), people living with HIV should be diagnosed as early as possible, after acquiring HIV infection. They should be enrolled and retained in pre-ART care, initiated on ART and retained in ART care. And at the same time ensuring long-term adherence to achieve and maintain viral load suppression.

This review focuses on the first few steps in the treatment cascade. The authors review the evidence for activities that enhance the linkage from HIV testing to pre-ART care, retain people in pre-ART care and enhance the linkage to ART initiation. Streamlining services to minimize patient visits, providing adequate medical and peer support, and providing incentives appear to decrease attrition between HIV testing and ART initiation. However, the authors point out that most of the included studies looked at the effect of a single activity on a single point, in the continuum of care. There is a gap in evidence of the effect of combined activities and programmes across the continuum of care.

With the clear trend towards the earliest possible initiation of ART, the pre-ART care period will become much shorter. However there will be need for activities to improve immediate linkage from a positive test result, to ART initiation and ART care.

Health care delivery
Africa, Asia
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How can we improve the UNAIDS modes of transmission model?

The HIV modes of transmission model: a systematic review of its findings and adherence to guidelines.

Shubber Z, Mishra S, Vesga JF, Boily MC. J Int AIDS Soc. 2014 Jun 23;17:18928. doi: 10.7448/IAS.17.1.18928. eCollection 2014.

Introduction: The HIV Modes of Transmission (MOT) model estimates the annual fraction of new HIV infections (FNI) acquired by different risk groups. It was designed to guide country-specific HIV prevention policies. To determine if the MOT produced context-specific recommendations, we analyzed MOT Results by region and epidemic type, and explored the factors (e.g. data used to estimate parameter inputs, adherence to guidelines) influencing the differences.

Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and UNAIDS reports, and contacted UNAIDS country directors for published MOT Results from MOT inception (2003) to 25 September 2012.

Results: We retrieved four journal articles and 20 UNAIDS reports covering 29 countries. In 13 countries, the largest FNI (range 26 to 63%) was acquired by the low-risk group and increased with low-risk population size. The FNI among female sex workers (FSWs) remained low (median 1.3%, range 0.04 to 14.4%), with little variability by region and epidemic type despite variability in sexual behaviour. In India and Thailand, where FSWs play an important role in transmission, the FNI among FSWs was 2 and 4%, respectively. In contrast, the FNI among men who have sex with men (MSM) varied across regions (range 0.1 to 89%) and increased with MSM population size. The FNI among people who inject drugs (PWID, range 0 to 82%) was largest in early-phase epidemics with low overall HIV prevalence. Most MOT studies were conducted and reported as per guidelines but data quality remains an issue.

Conclusions: Although countries are generally performing the MOT as per guidelines, there is little variation in the FNI (except among MSM and PWID) by region and epidemic type. Homogeneity in MOT FNI for FSWs, clients and low-risk groups may limit the utility of MOT for guiding country-specific interventions in heterosexual HIV epidemics.

 Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: In 2002, the HIV Modes of Transmission model (MoT) was developed by UNAIDS to inform and focus, country-specific HIV prevention policies. The idea behind the model was to use simple mathematical modelling approaches, in combination with country specific data, to predict what the distribution of new HIV infection may look like. In this way, countries would be able to better focus their HIV response. Since its development and through 2012, the MoT has been applied in 29 countries, with the findings being used in many settings to shape priorities. In this study, the authors assess the degree to which the MoT produces different outputs in different epidemic contexts. They explore whether there are key parameters in the model that seem to drive similarities and/or differences in projections between countries. Surprisingly, across a broad range of epidemic settings, they found limited variability in the predicted annual fraction of new HIV infections (FNI) acquired by female sex workers (FSW) (0.04-14.4%). There were higher levels of variability between countries in the projected fraction of new HIV infections among men who have sex with men (0.01-89%) and people who inject drugs (0-82%).

The differences in the MoT projections were largely dependent on whether the country in question was categorised as having a concentrated / low-level epidemic, versus generalised epidemic, as defined by UNAIDS. Differences also arose depending upon whether ‘low risk groups’ were also included in the model. Indeed, for 22 of the 25 studies that included a low-risk group, this group was predicted to have a large annual fraction of new HIV infections (11.8-62.9%). This phenomenon arose, not because of high transmission rates in this group (in comparison to others such as MSM or PWIDs) but because these ‘low risk groups’ are large. They are one third of the total population. These findings may be misleading, as the projected high fraction of transmission is dependent on the assumption that everyone in this ‘low risk group’ does have some risk.

It appears that although the MoT was designed to address an important need, it is likely to have limited utility to guide programming in heterosexually driven epidemics.  To address this limitation, UNAIDS is supporting the HIV Modelling Consortium in their development of a revised MoT model that takes into better consideration risk categorization, data constraints and programmatic needs. The revised model is currently undergoing field testing and will be available for country use in 2015.

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America
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Integrating HIV, malaria and diarrhoea prevention is far more efficient than vertical programmes

Scaling up integrated prevention campaigns for global health: costs and cost-effectiveness in 70 countries. 

Marseille E, Jiwani A, Raut A, Verguet S, Walson J, Kahn JG. BMJ Open. 2014 Jun 26;4(6):e003987. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003987.

Objective: This study estimated the health impact, cost and cost-effectiveness of an integrated prevention campaign (IPC) focused on diarrhoea, malaria and HIV in 70 countries ranked by per capita disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) burden for the three diseases.

Methods: We constructed a deterministic cost-effectiveness model portraying an IPC combining counselling and testing, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, referral to treatment and condom distribution for HIV prevention; bed nets for malaria prevention; and provision of household water filters for diarrhoea prevention. We developed a mix of empirical and modelled cost and health impact estimates applied to all 70 countries. One-way, multiway and scenario sensitivity analyses were conducted to document the strength of our findings. We used a healthcare payer's perspective, discounted costs and DALYs at 3% per year and denominated cost in 2012 US dollars.

Primary and secondary outcomes: The primary outcome was cost-effectiveness expressed as net cost per DALY averted. Other outcomes included cost of the IPC; net IPC costs adjusted for averted and additional medical costs and DALYs averted.

Results: Implementation of the IPC in the 10 most cost-effective countries at 15% population coverage would cost US$583 million over 3 years (adjusted costs of US$398 million), averting 8.0 million DALYs. Extending IPC programmes to all 70 of the identified high-burden countries at 15% coverage would cost an adjusted US$51.3 billion and avert 78.7 million DALYs. Incremental cost-effectiveness ranged from US$49 per DALY averted for the 10 countries with the most favourable cost-effectiveness to US$119, US$181, US$335, US$1 692 and US$8 340 per DALY averted as each successive group of 10 countries is added ordered by decreasing cost-effectiveness.

Conclusions: IPC appears cost-effective in many settings, and has the potential to substantially reduce the burden of disease in resource-poor countries. This study increases confidence that IPC can be an important new approach for enhancing global health.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Increasingly governments and policy makers are seeking to identify how to invest resources most effectively, to achieve multiple health and development outcomes. This paper presents a cost-effectiveness analysis of an integrated campaign to prevent diarrhoea, malaria and HIV.  

They developed a model to estimate the cost per disability adjusted life year (DALY) averted by this intervention, across 70 countries with high disease burden, assuming 15% coverage. The authors categorise countries by income level and their opportunity index (i.e. the opportunity to avert DALYs by having a high disease burden). The findings suggest that an integrated prevention campaign (IPC) could cost as little as US$7 per DALY averted in Guinea-Bissau, a low income, high opportunity country. As would be expected, the contribution of the different IPC components varied by country, depending on their relative disease burdens. This suggests that further focusing of activities within countries may further improve efficiency.

The model was also used to consider potential roll out strategies across counties. For this, countries were grouped into blocks of 10, and ordered with increasing incremental-cost effectiveness. The authors suggest that reaching the top 40 countries with IPC, even at just 15% coverage, could achieve far greater health benefits, with a substantially lower budget, than requested under PEPFAR for antiretroviral therapy alone.

This paper provides further evidence of the need for a more integrated approach to improve population health across disease areas.

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America
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Female sex workers exposed to community mobilization less exposed to sexually transmitted infections

Community mobilization and empowerment of female sex workers in Karnataka state, south India: associations with HIV and sexually transmitted infection risk. 

Beattie TS, Mohan HL, Bhattacharjee P, Chandrashekar S, Isac S, Wheeler T, Prakash R, Ramesh BM, Blanchard JF, Heise L, Vickerman P, Moses S, Watts C. Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun 12:e1-e10. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.301911 [Epub ahead of print]

Objectives: We examined the impact of community mobilization (CM) on the empowerment, risk behaviors, and prevalence of HIV and sexually transmitted infection in female sex workers (FSWs) in Karnataka, India.

Methods: We conducted behavioral-biological surveys in 2008 and 2011 in 4 districts of Karnataka, India. We defined exposure to CM as low, medium (attended nongovernmental organization meeting or drop-in centre), or high (member of collective or peer group). We used regression analyses to explore whether exposure to CM was associated with the preceding outcomes. Pathway analyses explored the degree to which effects could be attributable to CM.

Results: By the final survey, FSWs with high CM exposure were more likely to have been tested for HIV (adjusted odd ratio [AOR] = 25.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 13.07, 48.34) and to have used a condom at last sex with occasional clients (AOR = 4.74; 95% CI = 2.17, 10.37), repeat clients (AOR = 4.29; 95% CI = 2.24, 8.20), and regular partners (AOR = 2.80; 95% CI = 1.43, 5.45) than FSWs with low CM exposure. They were also less likely to be infected with gonorrhea or chlamydia (AOR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.87). Pathway analyses suggested CM acted above and beyond peer education; reduction in gonorrhea or chlamydia was attributable to CM.

Conclusions: CM is a central part of HIV prevention programming among FSWs, empowering them to better negotiate condom use and access services, as well as address other concerns in their lives.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Community mobilization is a group empowerment strategy that focuses on the structural drivers of HIV transmission. Starting in 2003, the Karnataka Health Promotion Trust in India collaborated with female sex workers to recruit peer educators. This led to the creation of drop-in centres, distribution of presumptive treatment of gonorrhoea and chlamydia infection, and ultimately the formation of locally-sustained collectives and community-based organisations. In 2011, half of female sex workers in Karnataka were members of one of these groups. Members of these groups were more likely to have used condoms with their sex partners and were less likely to contract either gonorrhoea or chlamydia. The findings suggest that community mobilization may work because it is strongly associated with both collective (power with) and individual (power to) empowerment of sex workers. This is one of the first studies of community engagement to include biological outcomes for HIV and sexually transmitted infection, rather than self-reported measures of behaviour that may be susceptible to bias. The results suggest that such community empowerment approaches may form an integral part of HIV prevention programming in sex worker communities. 

Asia
India
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Meta-analysis finds partial support for elevated HIV prevalence among the military

Systematic review and meta-analysis of HIV prevalence among men in militaries in low income and middle income countries. 

Lloyd J, Papworth E, Grant L, Beyrer C, Baral S. Sex Transm Infect. 2014 Apr 7. doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2013-051463. [Epub ahead of print]

Objectives: To determine whether the current HIV prevalence in militaries of low-income and middle-income countries is higher, the same, or lower than the HIV prevalence in the adult male population of those countries.

Methods: HIV prevalence data from low-income and middle-income countries' military men were systematically reviewed during 2000-2012 from peer reviewed journals, clearing-house databases and the internet. Standardised data abstraction forms were used to collect information on HIV prevalence, military branch and sample size. Random effects meta-analyses were completed with the Mantel-Haenszel method comparing HIV prevalence among military populations with other men in each country.

Results: 2 214 studies were retrieved, of which 18 studies representing nearly 150 000 military men across 11 countries and 4 regions were included. Military male HIV prevalence across the studies ranged from 0.06% (n=22 666) in India to 13.8% (n=2 733) in Tanzania with a pooled prevalence of 1.1% (n=147 591). HIV prevalence in male military populations in sub-Saharan Africa was significantly higher when compared with reproductive age (15-49 years) adult men (OR: 2.8, 95% CI 1.01 to 7.81). HIV prevalence in longer-serving male military populations compared with reproductive age adult men was significantly higher (OR: 2.68, 95% CI 1.65 to 4.35).

Conclusions: Our data reveals that across the different settings, the burden of HIV among militaries may be higher or lower than the civilian male populations. In this study, male military populations in sub-Saharan Africa, low-income countries and longer-serving men have significantly higher HIV prevalence. Given the national security implications of the increased burden of HIV, interventions targeting military personnel in these populations should be scaled up where appropriate.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Men in military service are considered a key population because they spend protracted periods away from home and may engage in casual or other high-risk sex. This is not just a health concern for the armed forces themselves, but countries have in the past refused the assistance of peacekeeping forces because they were deemed a source of new infections. This systematic review concludes that HIV infection rates in the military are not universally higher than among men of reproductive age in the general population. However, significantly elevated prevalence was detected in studies from sub-Saharan Africa and among military who have been in service for over one year. The latter suggests that the relatively high prevalence results from increased exposure during service rather than the disproportional recruitment of men with HIV into service. On the contrary, the prevalence among new recruits is lower than in the general population. Prevention efforts, including HIV testing and counselling, and condom distribution, need to be increased during deployment in settings where exposure to HIV is high.

Epidemiology
Africa, Asia, Latin America
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Fewer clinical events with early antiretroviral therapy in a trial among serodiscordant couples

Effects of early versus delayed initiation of antiretroviral treatment on clinical outcomes of HIV-1 infection: results from the phase 3 HPTN 052 randomised controlled trial.

Grinsztejn B, Hosseinipour MC, Ribaudo HJ, Swindells S, Eron J, Chen YQ, Wang L, Ou SS, Anderson M, McCauley M, Gamble T, Kumarasamy N, Hakim JG, Kumwenda J, Pilotto JH, Godbole SV, Chariyalertsak S, de Melo MG, Mayer KH, Eshleman SH, Piwowar-Manning E, Makhema J, Mills LA, Panchia R, Sanne I, Gallant J, Hoffman I, Taha TE, Nielsen-Saines K, Celentano D, Essex M, Havlir D, Cohen MS, HPTN 052-ACTG Study Team. Lancet Infect Dis. 2014 Apr;14(4):281-90. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70692-3. Epub 2014 Mar 4.

Background: Use of antiretroviral treatment for HIV-1 infection has decreased AIDS-related morbidity and mortality and prevents sexual transmission of HIV-1. However, the best time to initiate antiretroviral treatment to reduce progression of HIV-1 infection or non-AIDS clinical events is unknown. We reported previously that early antiretroviral treatment reduced HIV-1 transmission by 96%. We aimed to compare the effects of early and delayed initiation of antiretroviral treatment on clinical outcomes.

Methods: The HPTN 052 trial is a randomised controlled trial done at 13 sites in nine countries. We enrolled HIV-1-serodiscordant couples to the study and randomly allocated them to either early or delayed antiretroviral treatment by use of permuted block randomisation, stratified by site. Random assignment was unblinded. The HIV-1-infected member of every couple initiated antiretroviral treatment either on entry into the study (early treatment group) or after a decline in CD4 count or with onset of an AIDS-related illness (delayed treatment group). Primary events were AIDS clinical events (WHO stage 4 HIV-1 disease, tuberculosis, and severe bacterial infections) and the following serious medical conditions unrelated to AIDS: serious cardiovascular or vascular disease, serious liver disease, end-stage renal disease, new-onset diabetes mellitus, and non-AIDS malignant disease. Analysis was by intention-to-treat.

Findings: 1 763 people with HIV-1 infection and a serodiscordant partner were enrolled in the study; 886 were assigned early antiretroviral treatment and 877 to the delayed treatment group (two individuals were excluded from this group after randomisation). Median CD4 counts at randomisation were 442 (IQR 373-522) cells per μL in patients assigned to the early treatment group and 428 (357-522) cells per μL in those allocated delayed antiretroviral treatment. In the delayed group, antiretroviral treatment was initiated at a median CD4 count of 230 (IQR 197-249) cells per μL. Primary clinical events were reported in 57 individuals assigned to early treatment initiation versus 77 people allocated to delayed antiretroviral treatment (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% CI 0.52-1.03; p=0.074). New-onset AIDS events were recorded in 40 participants assigned to early antiretroviral treatment versus 61 allocated delayed initiation (0.64, 0.43-0.96; p=0.031), tuberculosis developed in 17 versus 34 patients, respectively (0.49, 0.28-0.89, p=0.018), and primary non-AIDS events were rare (12 in the early group vs nine with delayed treatment). In total, 498 primary and secondary outcomes occurred in the early treatment group (incidence 24.9 per 100 person-years, 95% CI 22.5-27.5) versus 585 in the delayed treatment group (29.2 per 100 person-years, 26.5-32.1; p=0.025). 26 people died, 11 who were allocated to early antiretroviral treatment and 15 who were assigned to the delayed treatment group.

Interpretation: Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment delayed the time to AIDS events and decreased the incidence of primary and secondary outcomes. The clinical benefits recorded, combined with the striking reduction in HIV-1 transmission risk previously reported, provides strong support for earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The HPTN 052 trial has received wide attention for its main result. This shows a large reduction in HIV transmission risk among HIV-serodiscordant couples where HIV-positive partners with CD4 counts between 350 and 550 started immediate antiretroviral therapy (ART). This was compared to deferring treatment until the CD4 count fell below 250 or an AIDS-defining illness occurred. This analysis reports on clinical events in the trial. Despite the trial population having relatively high CD4 counts at baseline, new AIDS-defining events, excluding tuberculosis, were the most common outcome. These were reduced in the early ART arm. Tuberculosis incidence was reduced by half. Non-AIDS events were rare.

For these trial results to translate into population level benefits, more people need to know their HIV status at an early stage, before they develop symptomatic disease. People with positive test results then need to link to care successfully so that treatment can be initiated. Stigma remains a key barrier to testing and accessing care in many settings. Virologic suppression among people in the intervention arm of this trial was very high, implying very good adherence to treatment. Strategies to support excellent adherence and retention are needed as ART programmes expand and include people starting ART earlier.

Comorbidity, HIV Treatment
Africa, Asia, Latin America
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Overcoming logistical barriers to implementing viral load testing

 

Systematic review of the use of dried blood spots for monitoring HIV viral load and for early infant diagnosis.

Smit PW, Sollis KA, Fiscus S, Ford N, Vitoria M, Essajee S, Barnett D, Cheng B, Crowe SM, Denny T, Landay A, Stevens W, Habiyambere V, Perriens JH, Peeling RW. PLoS One. 2014 Mar 6;9(3):e86461. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086461. eCollection 2014.

Background: Dried blood spots (DBS) have been used as alternative specimens to plasma to increase access to HIV viral load (VL) monitoring and early infant diagnosis (EID) in remote settings. We systematically reviewed evidence on the performance of DBS compared to plasma for VL monitoring and EID.

Methods and findings: Thirteen peer reviewed HIV VL publications and five HIV EID papers were included. Depending on the technology and the viral load distribution in the study population, the percentage of DBS samples that are within 0.5 log of VL in plasma ranged from 52-100%. Because the input sample volume is much smaller in a blood spot, there is a risk of false negatives with DBS. Sensitivity of DBS VL was found to be 78-100% compared to plasma at VL below 1 000 copies/ml, but this increased to 100% at a threshold of 5 000 copies/ml. Unlike a plasma VL test which measures only cell free HIV RNA, a DBS VL also measures proviral DNA as well as cell-associated RNA, potentially leading to false positive results when using DBS. The systematic review showed that specificity was close to 100% at DBS VL above 5 000 copies/ml, and this threshold would be the most reliable for predicting true virologic failure using DBS. For early infant diagnosis, DBS has a sensitivity of 100% compared to fresh whole blood or plasma in all studies.  

Conclusions: Although limited data are available for EID, DBS offer a highly sensitive and specific sampling strategy to make viral load monitoring and early infant diagnosis more accessible in remote settings. A standardized approach for sampling, storing, and processing DBS samples would be essential to allow successful implementation.

Abstract    Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: The World Health Organization recommends that viral load monitoring is used to confirm early infant diagnoses of HIV and to monitor people on antiretroviral therapy for treatment failure. However, viral load monitoring is expensive, technically complex and requires good laboratory infrastructure and highly trained staff. As a result few countries in resource-limited settings have been able to implement these guidelines.

This systematic review evaluates the performance of dried blood spots as compared to plasma for measuring viral load. Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative sampling strategy which could be used to overcome some of the logistical barriers to the widespread implementation of viral load testing. They can be performed by lay workers as there is no need for phlebotomy. Whole blood from a finger or heel prick is placed directly onto filter paper and once dried they can be stored with desiccant and transferred to the central laboratory at room temperature. The results of this systematic review confirm that DBS offer a highly sensitive and specific sampling strategy for early infant diagnosis and for detecting virologic failure at a viral load threshold of      >5 000 copies/ml. However, the authors’ stress that in order to compare different methodologies, standardised protocols for sampling, storing and processing samples are needed. DBS do provide a very promising strategy for increasing access to viral load monitoring. However if we are to see an impact on outcomes, the roll out of DBS will need to be accompanied by robust systems to ensure timely turn-around-times for results. Staff training and support to ensure that appropriate action is taken following a raised viral load, are also a must.

Africa, Asia, Europe
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Masking diversity – the problems with labels for key populations

'Mobile men with money': HIV prevention and the erasure of difference.

Aggleton P, Bell SA, Kelly-Hanku A. Glob Public Health. 2014;9(3):257-70. doi: 10.1080/17441692.2014.889736. Epub 2014 Mar 4.

Mobile Men with Money is one of the latest risk categories to enter into HIV prevention discourse. Used in countries in Asia, the Pacific and Africa, it refers to diverse groups of men (e.g. businessmen, miners and itinerant wage labourers) who, in contexts of high population movement and economic disparity, find themselves at heightened risk of HIV as members of a 'most-at-risk population', or render others vulnerable to infection. How adequate is such a description? Does it make sense to develop HIV prevention programmes from such understandings? The history of the epidemic points to major weaknesses in the use of terminologies such as 'sex worker' and 'men who have sex with men' when characterising often diverse populations. Each of these terms carries negative connotations, portraying the individuals concerned as being apart from the 'general population', and posing a threat to it. This paper examines the diversity of men classified as mobile men with money, pointing to significant variations in mobility, wealth and sexual networking conducive to HIV transmission. It highlights the patriarchal, heteronormative and gendered assumptions frequently underpinning use of the category and suggests more useful ways of understanding men, masculinity, population movement, relative wealth in relation to HIV vulnerability and risk.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Criticism of the use of labels to identify groups of people considered to be at high risk of HIV infection is not new, but this paper serves as a timely reminder of the dangers of such labels and abbreviations. The authors explain why a term that has entered common usage in recent years ‘mobile men with money’, is inappropriate. They argue that the label plays to stereotypes of men as powerful risk takers and, usually, women as their vulnerable victims. The use of the term hides the diversity of men who move around because of their work and other activities, who may be in very different professions and circumstances. It also suggests that mobility is a negative activity, overlooking the great economic and other benefits of migration. They argue that the term is not helpful for HIV programming or activities.  It is unhelpful because it fails to take account of the structural factors that influence and shape the risks many men and women, face. It is often tempting to make use of abbreviations and catchy phrases in our work. This paper helps to remind us why we need to think carefully about terminology and labelling.

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Urgent need to focus HIV prevention efforts on mobile men who have sex with men in India

The effect of mobility on sexual risk behaviour and HIV infection: a cross-sectional study of men who have sex with men in southern India.

Ramesh S, Mehrotra P, Mahapatra B, Ganju D, Nagarajan K, Saggurti N. Sex Transm Infect. 2014 Mar 26. doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2013-051350. [Epub ahead of print]

Objectives: Mobility is an important factor contributing to the spread of HIV among key population at risk for HIV; however, research linking this relationship among men who have sex men (MSM) is scarce in India. This study examines the association between mobility and sexual risk behaviour and HIV infection among MSM in southern India.

Methods: Data are drawn from a cross-sectional biobehavioural survey of 1 608 self-identified MSM from four districts of Andhra Pradesh in India, recruited through a probability-based sampling in 2009-2010. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% CIs for sexual risk behaviours (unprotected sex with any male partner) and HIV infection based on the mobility status (travelled and had sex in the past year) after adjusting for sociodemographics and risk behaviours.

Results: Of the 1 608 MSM, one-fourth (26%) were mobile. Of these, three-fourths had travelled across districts but within the state (56%), and one-fifth (20%) across states. As compared to non-mobile MSM, a higher proportion of MSM who were mobile across districts (adjusted (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.95) or states (adjusted OR=3.20, 95% CI 1.65 to 6.17) reported having unprotected sex with any male sexual partner. Further, mobility across districts (adjusted OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.03) or states (adjusted OR=2.45, 95% CI 1.46 to 4.10) was significantly associated with HIV infection.

Conclusions: Mobile MSM have a higher likelihood of contracting HIV. Interventions extending the ways to reach out to MSM with greater mobility may augment ongoing efforts to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in India.

Abstract   Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Men who have sex with men are a key group for HIV prevention in India and many other settings. In India, MSM are a socially marginalised group, and people who tend to travel geographically are likely to have relatively little contact with prevention services. This study attempted to better understand the degree and pattern of mobility for this vulnerable group, in order to guide future programmes. The data, from a large cross-sectional survey in Andhra Pradesh, showed a high degree of mobility. It also showed that mobility was significantly associated with higher risk sexual behaviour and with HIV prevalence. The study highlights the need to renew efforts to focus prevention services on the hard-to-reach population of mobile men who have sex with men.

Asia
India
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