Articles tagged as "Kenya"

The power of PEPFAR programmes: estimates of infections averted and life years gained in Africa

Estimating the impact of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief on HIV treatment and prevention programmes in Africa.

Heaton LM, Bouey PD, Fu J, Stover J, Fowler TB, Lyerla R, Mahy M. Sex Transm Infect. 2015 Dec;91(8):615-20. doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2014-051991. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Background: Since 2004, the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has supported the tremendous scale-up of HIV prevention, care and treatment services, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluate the impact of antiretroviral treatment (ART), prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) programmes on survival, mortality, new infections and the number of orphans from 2004 to 2013 in 16 PEPFAR countries in Africa.

Methods: PEPFAR indicators tracking the number of persons receiving ART for their own health, ART regimens for PMTCT and biomedical prevention of HIV through VMMC were collected across 16 PEPFAR countries. To estimate the impact of PEPFAR programmes for ART, PMTCT and VMMC, we compared the current scenario of PEPFAR-supported interventions to a counterfactual scenario without PEPFAR, and assessed the number of life years gained (LYG), number of orphans averted and HIV infections averted. Mathematical modelling was conducted using the SPECTRUM modelling suite V.5.03.

Results: From 2004 to 2013, PEPFAR programmes provided support for a cumulative number of     24 565 127 adults and children on ART, 4 154 878 medical male circumcisions, and ART for PMTCT among 4 154 478 pregnant women in 16 PEPFAR countries. Based on findings from the model, these efforts have helped avert 2.9 million HIV infections in the same period. During 2004-2013, PEPFAR ART programmes alone helped avert almost 9 million orphans in 16 PEPFAR countries and resulted in 11.6 million LYG.

Conclusions: Modelling results suggest that the rapid scale-up of PEPFAR-funded ART, PMTCT and VMMC programmes in Africa during 2004-2013 led to substantially fewer new HIV infections and orphaned children during that time and longer lives among people living with HIV. Our estimates do not account for the impact of the PEPFAR-funded non-biomedical interventions such as behavioural and structural interventions included in the comprehensive HIV prevention, care and treatment strategy used by PEPFAR countries. Therefore, the number of HIV infections and orphans averted and LYG may be underestimated by these models.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) was initiated in 2004 with $42 billion spent up until the end of 2013. Despite limitations in monitoring the overall contribution of PEPFAR to individual programmes, this article attempts to provide an overview of PEPFAR support for ART, prevention of mother to child transmission and voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) programmes using the 2014 version of Spectrum Software model. The Spectrum modules used included DemProj, AIDS Impact Model (AIM) and Goals, which interact to model the impact and future course of the HIV epidemic at the population level.  An estimate of PEPFAR’s contribution was obtained by subtracting it from the total for the national programme statistics reported by UNAIDS on ART, PMTCT and VMMC.

The baseline scenario of PEPFAR-supported programmes in 2013 was compared to a counterfactual scenario, which subtracts the direct contribution of PEPFAR. The results estimate that the combined programmes have averted 2.7 million infections in Africa, with over 11.5 million life years gained and the aversion of almost nine million orphans. Other key population programmes that the funding supported including gender equity and health strengthening were not evaluated and therefore, the estimate for impact may be conservative. A limitation of the analysis is that it is unable to predict the national response without PEPFAR and the impact of ART calculated by the model is sensitive to the distribution of new ART patients by CD4 count at the initiation of treatment. In addition, few countries have sufficient death registration systems to validate mortality estimates, which may result in the accomplishments of PEPFAR’s impact being overestimated. However, with the operation of PEPFAR in a larger context of partnership consortiums, an improvement in evaluation methods will be necessary. 

Africa
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Untreated maternal HIV infection and poor perinatal outcomes

Perinatal outcomes associated with maternal HIV infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Wedi CO, Kirtley S, Hopewell S, Corrigan R, Kennedy SH, Hemelaar J. Lancet HIV. 2016 Jan;3(1):e33-48. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(15)00207-6. Epub 2015 Nov 27.

Background: The HIV pandemic affects 36.9 million people worldwide, of whom 1.5 million are pregnant women. 91% of HIV-positive pregnant women reside in sub-Saharan Africa, a region that also has very poor perinatal outcomes. We aimed to establish whether untreated maternal HIV infection is associated with specific perinatal outcomes.

Methods: We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of the scientific literature by searching PubMed, CINAHL (Ebscohost), Global Health (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and four clinical trial databases (WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, the ClinicalTrials.gov database, and the ISRCTN Registry) for studies published from Jan 1, 1980, to Dec 7, 2014. Two authors independently reviewed the studies retrieved by the scientific literature search, identified relevant studies, and extracted the data. We investigated the associations between maternal HIV infection in women naive to antiretroviral therapy and 11 perinatal outcomes: preterm birth, very preterm birth, low birthweight, very low birthweight, term low birthweight, preterm low birthweight, small for gestational age, very small for gestational age, miscarriage, stillbirth, and neonatal death. We included prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-control studies reporting perinatal outcomes in HIV-positive women naive to antiretroviral therapy and HIV-negative controls. We used a random-effects model for the meta-analyses of specific perinatal outcomes. We did subgroup and sensitivity analyses and assessed the effect of adjustment for confounders. This systematic review and meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42013005638.

Findings: Of 60 750 studies identified, we obtained data from 35 studies (20 prospective cohort studies, 12 retrospective cohort studies, and three case-control studies) including 53 623 women. Our meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies show that maternal HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (relative risk 1.50, 95% CI 1.24-1.82), low birthweight (1.62, 1.41-1.86), small for gestational age (1.31, 1.14-1.51), and stillbirth (1.67, 1.05-2.66). Retrospective cohort studies also suggest an increased risk of term low birthweight (2.62, 1.15-5.93) and preterm low birthweight (3.25, 2.12-4.99). The strongest and most consistent evidence for these associations is identified in sub-Saharan Africa. No association was identified between maternal HIV infection and very preterm birth, very small for gestational age, very low birthweight, miscarriage, or neonatal death, although few data were available for these outcomes. Correction for confounders did not affect the significance of these findings.

Interpretation: Maternal HIV infection in women who have not received antiretroviral therapy is associated with preterm birth, low birthweight, small for gestational age, and stillbirth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Research is needed to assess how antiretroviral therapy regimens affect these perinatal outcomes.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes:  Maternal HIV infection is associated with maternal morbidity and mortality and risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Whether maternal HIV infection affects perinatal outcomes, which are major contributors to poor health worldwide, is less well understood. This systematic review and meta-analysis of retrospective and prospective cohort studies and case-control studies demonstrates that untreated maternal HIV infection is associated with increased risk of pre-term birth, low birthweight, small for gestational age and stillbirth. The risk of adverse perinatal outcomes appeared to increase with more advanced HIV disease, although only three of the 35 studies reported perinatal outcomes according to HIV disease stage. These findings persisted even after controlling for potential confounding factors and irrespective of the method used for determining gestational age. None of the studies used a first trimester ultrasound scan, the gold standard for determining gestational age. The association of perinatal outcomes with the infant’s HIV status was not investigated. The strongest evidence for these associations was found in sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of the studies were conducted.

These findings suggest that HIV is an important contributor to the global burden of perinatal and child morbidity and mortality particularly in countries with the highest burden of maternal HIV infection.     Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest rates of stillbirths and neonatal deaths and is also the region where more than 90% of the world’s pregnant women living with HIV reside.

This study has important implications. Firstly, the coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among pregnant women worldwide still remains suboptimal (estimated to be 68% in 2013), exposing women living with untreated HIV to an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. The biological mechanisms underlying adverse perinatal outcomes in the context of HIV infection are not understood. ART in pregnancy may also adversely affect perinatal outcomes, and there is a pressing need to investigate this as ART is rapidly scaled up.     

Africa, Europe, Northern America
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Inequalities in decision-making and carrying the burden of taking PrEP in serodiscordant relationships

Gendered differences in the perceived risks and benefits of oral PrEP among HIV-serodiscordant couples in Kenya.

Carroll JJ, Ngure K, Heffron R, Curran K, Mugo NR, Baeten JM. AIDS Care. 2016 Jan 11:1-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective for preventing HIV among HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples. Gender roles may influence perceived personal and social risks related to HIV-prevention behaviors and may affect use of PrEP. In this study, interviews and focus groups were conducted with 68 individuals from 34 mutually disclosed serodiscordant heterosexual partnerships in Thika, Kenya. Sociocultural factors that affect adherence to PrEP were explored using grounded analysis. Three factors were identified, which shape perceptions of PrEP: gendered power dynamics and control over decision-making in the household; conflicts between risk-reduction strategies and male sexual desire; culture-bound definitions of women's work. Adherence to PrEP in the Partners PrEP Study was high; however, participants articulated conflicting interests related to PrEP in connection with traditional gender roles. The successful delivery of PrEP will require understanding of key social factors, particularly related to gender and dyadic dynamics around HIV serostatus.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: If the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and other biomedical approaches to HIV-prevention are to be rolled out effectively, it is vital to understand the barriers and facilitators for use. In this paper, the authors explore factors that shape perceived risks, benefits and barriers of using oral PrEP and other associated HIV-prevention strategies in Partners PrEP trial in Uganda. The authors identified three themes. Firstly ‘gendered power dynamics and control over decision-making in the household’ highlighted how men and women have different power in decision-making about PrEP use. The majority of women reported that the decision lay with their partner and men reported that they were solely responsible for their decision to use PrEP. However, women said they used subtler ways to exert their decision. Some men suggested that the use of PrEP should be a joint decision. The second theme, ‘conflicts between risk-reduction strategies and male sexual desire’ revealed that use of condoms for HIV prevention conflicted with men’s desire for pleasure, especially for seronegative men. For seropositive women concerns were voiced about men seeking sexual pleasure elsewhere. The third theme of culture-bound definitions of women’s work in the household highlighted how taking PrEP was seen to be ‘labour’ and a household task. HIV-seronegative men thus considered the management of clinic visits and drug regimens to be women’s responsibility and PrEP taking, as men’s burden. Thinking PrEP taking was a burden on men; HIV-seropositive women framed their responsibilities in terms of sacrifices that they made for their families. However, seropositive men did not refer to PrEP as a burden at all.

The authors conclude that while these reported gender differences between partners taking PrEP are stresses, given the high adherence to PrEP in the Partners PrEP trial they did not seem to be a deterrent. This study confirms evidence of gender inequalities in decision-making about the use HIV prevention technologies, including PrEP and condoms. Further, the authors provide new insights into the ‘labour’ discourse of taking medication and attending clinics and illustrate that this burden is seen as women’s work. 

Gender
Africa
Kenya
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How gender norms and power may impact on the acceptability, access and adherence to microbicides

Optimizing HIV prevention for women: a review of evidence from microbicide studies and considerations for gender-sensitive microbicide introduction.

Doggett EG, Lanham M, Wilcher R, Gafos M, Karim QA, Heise L. J Int AIDS Soc. 2015 Dec 21;18(1):20536. doi: 10.7448/IAS.18.1.20536. eCollection 2015.

Introduction: Microbicides were conceptualized as a product that could give women increased agency over HIV prevention. However, gender-related norms and inequalities that place women and girls at risk of acquiring HIV are also likely to affect their ability to use microbicides. Understanding how gendered norms and inequalities may pose obstacles to women's microbicide use is important to inform product design, microbicide trial implementation and eventually microbicide and other antiretroviral-based prevention programmes. We reviewed published vaginal microbicide studies to identify gender-related factors that are likely to affect microbicide acceptability, access and adherence. We make recommendations on product design, trial implementation, positioning, marketing and delivery of microbicides in a way that takes into account the gender-related norms and inequalities identified in the review.

Methods: We conducted PubMed searches for microbicide studies published in journals between 2000 and 2013. Search terms included trial names (e.g. "MDP301"), microbicide product names (e.g. "BufferGel"), researchers' names (e.g. "van der Straten") and other relevant terms (e.g. "microbicide"). We included microbicide clinical trials; surrogate studies in which a vaginal gel, ring or diaphragm was used without an active ingredient; and hypothetical studies in which no product was used. Social and behavioural studies implemented in conjunction with clinical trials and surrogate studies were also included. Although we recognize the importance of rectal microbicides to women, we did not include studies of rectal microbicides, as most of them focused on men who have sex with men. Using a standardized review template, three reviewers read the articles and looked for gender-related findings in key domains (e.g. product acceptability, sexual pleasure, partner communication, microbicide access and adherence).

Results and discussion: The gendered norms, roles and relations that will likely affect women's ability to access and use microbicides are related to two broad categories: norms regulating women's and men's sexuality and power dynamics within intimate relationships. Though norms about women's and men's sexuality vary among cultural contexts, women's sexual behaviour and pleasure are typically less socially acceptable and more restricted than men's. These norms drive the need for woman-initiated HIV prevention, but also have implications for microbicide acceptability and how they are likely to be used by women of different ages and relationship types. Women's limited power to negotiate the circumstances of their intimate relationships and sex lives will impact their ability to access and use microbicides. Men's role in women's effective microbicide use can range from opposition to non-interference to active support.

Conclusions: Identifying an effective microbicide that women can use consistently is vital to the future of HIV prevention for women. Once such a microbicide is identified and licensed, positioning, marketing and delivering microbicides in a way that takes into account the gendered norms and inequalities we have identified would help maximize access and adherence. It also has the potential to improve communication about sexuality, strengthen relationships between women and men and increase women's agency over their bodies and their health.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This paper presents a review of the evidence of microbicides research to understand gender-associated factors that could impact on acceptability, access and adherence. These gender norms include women and men’s sexual norms and power differentials in intimate partner relationships. This review included studies conducted between 2000 and 2013 and thus only includes papers on hypothetical research and clinical trials. While the studies were conducted in a variety of contexts the authors found a number of similar norms and power differentials.

In relation to sexual norms, the review revealed findings on sexual risk, sexual pleasure, and sexual preferences. In terms of sexual risk there were differing opinions across the studies of which women were most likely to need microbicides. Some studies suggested that microbicides should be focused on women in steady partnerships where condom negotiation is difficult, while others suggested focusing on key populations such as sex workers. Across many studies the potential for promoting sexual pleasure for both women and men emerged as an advantage of microbicides, and had an impact on acceptability. However, many of the studies highlighted how men’s sexual pleasure takes precedence. In relation to sexual preferences, the much touted idea that men prefer ‘dry’ or ‘tight’ sex was challenged by some of the studies, which found that the lubricating effect of the gel was acceptable.

The review also uncovered issues associated to power inequalities in intimate partner relationships, including power to control time of sex, male partner engagement and communication, and intimate-partner violence. Women reported in many studies their lack of power to control the timing of sex and this is seen as likely to impact on their ability to use coitally-dependant microbicides. However, there is some evidence that men supported women’s use of the gel, although this depended on the type of relationship. While microbicides have been promoted as products that women can use without a partner’s knowledge the review illustrated that women do prefer to communicate with their partners about their use and there is evidence of joint-decision making. Further, there was evidence of women experiencing intimate partner violence in relation to trial participation. There is also some evidence that women were less likely to discuss or use microbicides in violent relationships.

This highly comprehensive review concludes that while microbicides will not empower women they do have the potential to enhance women’s agency in relation to their health and sexuality and may improve communication in their relationships. However, the authors conclude that gender norms and power differentials may impact on acceptability, access and adherence.

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Predicting acute HIV infection in key populations

Targeted screening of at-risk adults for acute HIV-1 infection in sub-Saharan Africa.

Sanders EJ, Wahome E, Powers KA, Werner L, Fegan G, Lavreys L, Mapanje C, McClelland RS, Garrett N, Miller WC, Graham SM. AIDS. 2015 Dec;29 Suppl 3:S221-30. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000924.

Background: Patients with acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) have elevated infectivity, but cannot be diagnosed using antibody-based testing. Approaches to screen patients for AHI are urgently needed to enable counselling and treatment to reduce onward transmission.

Methods: We pooled data from four African studies of high-risk adults that evaluated symptoms and signs compatible with acute retroviral syndrome and tested for HIV-1 at each visit. AHI was defined as detectable plasma viral load or p24 antigen in an HIV-1-antibody-negative patient who subsequently seroconverted. Using generalized estimating equation, we identified symptoms, signs, and demographic factors predictive of AHI, adjusting for study site. We assigned a predictor score to each statistically significant predictor based on its beta coefficient, summing predictor scores to calculate a risk score for each participant. We evaluated the performance of this algorithm overall and at each site.

Results: We compared 122 AHI visits with 45 961 visits by uninfected patients. Younger age (18-29 years), fever, fatigue, body pains, diarrhoea, sore throat, and genital ulcer disease were independent predictors of AHI. The overall area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for the algorithm was 0.78, with site-specific AUCs ranging from 0.61 to 0.89. A risk score of at least 2 would indicate AHI testing for 5-50% of participants, substantially decreasing the number needing testing.

Conclusion: Our targeted risk score algorithm based on seven characteristics reduced the number of patients needing AHI testing and had good performance overall. We recommend this risk score algorithm for use by HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa with capacity to test high-risk patients for AHI.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This analysis adds to the literature around the performance of risk score algorithms to guide testing for acute HIV infection (AHI). The four studies included in this analysis involved key populations in different African settings. In common with previous analyses, genital ulcer disease had by far the strongest association with AHI. The derived algorithm had modest accuracy overall and poor performance in South Africa, where symptoms and signs were particularly infrequent.

Most studies included in this analysis were cohort studies following key individuals. Whether or not algorithms based on recording of symptoms and signs during intensive follow-up for AHI can be translated for use in a real world situation of unselected people presenting for health care remains unproven. Ultimately, we really need evidence about the impact and cost-effectiveness of detecting AHI in different populations. This is in order to define the role of testing for AHI, and in particular whether rationalising testing with algorithms such as this is necessary (especially for key populations).   

Africa
Kenya, Malawi, South Africa
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Violence experience of women living with HIV: a global study

Violence. Enough already: findings from a global participatory survey among women living with HIV.

Orza L, Bewley S, Chung C, Crone ET, Nagadya H, Vazquez M, Welbourn A. J Int AIDS Soc. 2015 Dec 1;18(6 Suppl 5):20285. doi: 10.7448/IAS.18.6.20285. eCollection 2015.

Introduction: Women living with HIV are vulnerable to gender-based violence (GBV) before and after diagnosis, in multiple settings. This study's aim was to explore how GBV is experienced by women living with HIV, how this affects women's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and human rights (HR), and the implications for policymakers.

Methods: A community-based, participatory, user-led, mixed-methods study was conducted, with women living with HIV from key affected populations. Simple descriptive frequencies were used for quantitative data. Thematic coding of open qualitative responses was performed and validated with key respondents.

Results: In total, 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries participated in the study. Eighty-nine percent of 480 respondents to an optional section on GBV reported having experienced or feared violence, either before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. GBV reporting was higher after HIV diagnosis (intimate partner, family/neighbours, community and health settings). Women described a complex and iterative relationship between GBV and HIV occurring throughout their lives, including breaches of confidentiality and lack of SRH choice in healthcare settings, forced/coerced treatments, HR abuses, moralistic and judgemental attitudes (including towards women from key populations), and fear of losing child custody. Respondents recommended healthcare practitioners and policymakers address stigma and discrimination, training, awareness-raising, and HR abuses in healthcare settings.

Conclusions: Respondents reported increased GBV with partners and in families, communities and healthcare settings after their HIV diagnosis and across the life-cycle. Measures of GBV must be sought and monitored, particularly within healthcare settings that should be safe. Respondents offered policymakers a comprehensive range of recommendations to achieve their SRH and HR goals. Global guidance documents and policies are more likely to succeed for the end-users if lived experiences are used.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Violence against women who are living with HIV is common globally. This paper reports on a study of 832 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in an online survey, recruited through a non-random snowball sampling model. The survey comprised quantitative and qualitative (free text) components. Participants included women who had ever or were currently using injection drugs (14%), who had ever or were currently selling sex (14%), and who had ever or were currently homeless (14%). Lifetime experience of violence among respondents was high (86%). Perpetrators included: intimate partner (59%), family member / neighbour (45%), community member (53%), health care workers (53%) and police, military, prison or detention services (17%). Findings suggest that violence is not a one off occurrence and cannot easily be packaged as a cause or a consequence of HIV. Instead violence occurs throughout women’s lives, takes multiple forms, and has a complex and iterative relationship with HIV.

The study population did not represent all women living with HIV, and was biased towards women with internet access who have an activist interest. Nonetheless, the study provides further evidence of the breadth and frequency of gender based violence experienced by women living with HIV. Key recommendations for policy makers include training of health care workers working in sexual and reproductive services to offer non-discriminatory services to women living with HIV and to effectively respond to disclosures of gender based violence (such as intimate partner violence) as part of the package of care.

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Togo, Transdniestria, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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Weighing up the risks and benefits of trial participation: understanding non-adherence in a PrEP trial

Participants' explanations for non-adherence in the FEM-PrEP clinical trial.

Corneli A, Perry B, McKenna K, Agot K, Ahmed K, Taylor J, Malamatsho F, Odhiambo J, Skhosana J, Van Damme L. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Nov 3. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: FEM-PrEP - a clinical trial of daily, oral emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for HIV prevention among women in sub-Saharan Africa - did not show a reduction in HIV acquisition because of low adherence to the study pill. We conducted a follow-up study to identify reasons for non-adherence.

Methods: Qualitative, semi-structured interviews (n=88) and quantitative, audio computer-assisted self-interviews (n=224) were conducted with former FEM-PrEP participants in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data, and descriptive statistics were used to describe ACASI responses. Data are presented within the five categories of Ickovics' and Meisler's conceptual framework on adherence: 1) the individual, 2) trial characteristics and study pill regimen, 3) patient-provider relationship, 4) clinical setting, and 5) the disease.

Results: Participants' explanations for non-adherence were primarily situated within three of the framework's five categories: 1) the individual, 2) trial characteristics and study pill regimen, and 3) the disease. Concerns about the investigational nature of the drug being tested and side effects were the prominent reasons reported for non-adherence. Participants also described being discouraged from taking the study pill by members of the community, their sexual partners, and other participants, primarily because of these same concerns. Limited acceptability of the pill's attributes influenced non-adherence for some participants as did concerns about HIV-related stigma. Additionally, many participants reported that others continued in FEM-PrEP while not taking the study pill because of the trial's ancillary benefits and visit reimbursement - factors related to the clinical setting. Negative patient-provider relationships were infrequently reported as a factor that influenced non-adherence.

Conclusion: Despite substantial study staff engagement with participants and communities, concerns about the study pill and discouragement from others appeared to have influenced non-adherence considerably. Alternative study designs or procedures and enhanced community engagement paradigms may be needed in future studies.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The authors of this important paper on a PrEP trial, end with a note of caution. They note that when interpreting the findings we should remember that the women in this study were taking a ‘study product’. The women were not taking a product of proven efficacy. Therefore, as the authors state, it would be wrong to assume that ‘African women cannot and will not be adherent if provided with PrEP outside of a clinical trial setting’. If they had been told that the product was efficacious, they may have behaved differently. This is important because a key message of the paper is that trial participants managed their participation so they felt comfortable in the trial. Many wanted to ensure they received benefits from their participation, including good health care, but they also wanted to manage risk. Risk associated with fears about the trial drug and risk from the disapproval of sexual partners about their participation. It is also very clear in these findings that the participants could manage the expectations of the trial team, by telling them what they wanted to hear during the trial. This suggests the limited value of ‘adherence questionnaires’ in some settings. The authors provide a powerful illustration of the value of mixed methods in trials of this sort. Drug concentration data told the researchers that many women were not adhering to the drug. Qualitative semi-structured interviews using this drug concentration data with the individual women helped the team to understand why. The authors also discuss the influence of community and family members in undermining participant faith in the trial. They explain the lengths that the trial team went to, to inform community members about the trial. Considerable time was given to sharing information. Doubts remained; concerns that were enough to discourage participation. This too is an important finding underlining the value of investing in community engagement in research. But it also highlights the need to find ways to enhance not just engagement, but also understanding and trust. 

Africa
Kenya, South Africa
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Condoms are highly effective at preventing HSV-2 acquisition, especially for women

Effect of condom use on per-act HSV-2 transmission risk in HIV-1, HSV-2-discordant couples.

Magaret AS, Mujugira A, Hughes JP, Lingappa J, Bukusi EA, DeBruyn G, Delany-Moretlwe S, Fife KH, Gray GE, Kapiga S, Karita E, Mugo NR, Rees H, Ronald A, Vwalika B, Were E, Celum C, Wald A, Partners in Prevention HSVHIVTST. Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Nov 17. pii: civ908. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: The efficacy of condoms for protection against transmission of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) has been examined in a variety of populations with different effect measures. Often the efficacy has been assessed as change in hazard of transmission with consistent vs inconsistent use, independent of the number of acts. Condom efficacy has not been previously measured on a per-act basis.

Methods: We examined the per-act HSV-2 transmission rates with and without condom use among 911 African HSV-2 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) serodiscordant couples followed for an average of 18 months in an HIV prevention study. Infectivity models were used to associate the log10 probability of HSV-2 transmission over monthly risk periods with reported numbers of protected and unprotected sex acts. Condom efficacy was computed as the proportionate reduction in transmission risk for protected relative to unprotected sex acts.

Results: Transmission of HSV-2 occurred in 68 couples, including 17 with susceptible women and 51 with susceptible men. The highest rate of transmission was from men to women: 28.5 transmissions per 1000 unprotected sex acts. We found that condoms were differentially protective against HSV-2 transmission by sex; condom use reduced per-act risk of transmission from men to women by 96% (P < .001) and marginally from women to men by 65% (P = .060).

Conclusions: Condoms are recommended as an effective preventive method for heterosexual transmission of HSV-2.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: HSV-2 is extremely prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, and an important co-factor in HIV transmission. Although condoms are recommended for preventing HSV-2 infection, there have been no previous studies of their effectiveness on a per-sex act basis. This study in HIV and HSV-2 discordant couples participating in an HIV prevention trial examined the risk of HSV-2 transmission for each sex act with and without male condoms. At enrolment, index partners were living with both HIV and HSV-2 infections; susceptible partners were negative for both infections.

The authors found that condoms provided greater protection against HSV-2 acquisition for women than for men, reducing the risk of transmission by 96% from men to women, and by 65% from women to men. However, the overall risk of HSV-2 infection was much higher for women – for each condomless sex act, women were nearly 20 times more likely than men to become infected. As a result, even when using condoms, susceptible women had only a slightly lower risk of infection than men did without condoms. Interestingly, HSV-2 suppressive therapy with acyclovir did not have any effect on HSV-2 transmission, for either sex. Although the authors were not able to confirm that the HSV-2 transmissions occurred within the partnership (e.g. by sequencing the HSV2 DNA), an analysis restricted to couples who never reported sex outside the partnership illustrated very similar results.

The difference in the protection provided by condoms between the sexes may be explained by the fact that, in men, HSV-2 viral shedding is primarily from the penile shaft whereas in women the virus is shed from the wider area of the perineum, and hence condoms are less effective for female-male transmission. These findings indicate that, in individuals who are both HIV and HSV-2 positive, male condoms are extremely effective in preventing male-to-female transmission of HSV-2, and also provide some protection against female-to-male transmission. Although condoms may not provide the same level of protection in populations who are HIV negative, their promotion remains an important public health activity for preventing HSV-2 infection.

Africa
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Contraception for women on ART – a balancing act

Pregnancy rates in HIV-positive women using contraceptives and efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy in Kenya: a retrospective cohort study.

Patel RC, Onono M, Gandhi M, Blat C, Hagey J, Shade SB, Vittinghoff E, Bukusi EA, Newmann SJ, Cohen CR. Lancet HIV. 2015 Nov;2(11):e474-82. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(15)00184-8. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Background: Concerns have been raised about efavirenz reducing the effectiveness of contraceptive implants. We aimed to establish whether pregnancy rates differ between HIV-positive women who use various contraceptive methods and either efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens.

Methods: We did this retrospective cohort study of HIV-positive women aged 15-45 years enrolled in 19 HIV care facilities supported by Family AIDS Care and Education Services in western Kenya between Jan 1, 2011, and Dec 31, 2013. Our primary outcome was incident pregnancy diagnosed clinically. The primary exposure was a combination of contraceptive method and efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based ART regimen. We used Poisson models, adjusting for repeated measures, and demographic, behavioural, and clinical factors, to compare pregnancy rates among women receiving different contraceptive and ART combinations.

Findings: 24 560 women contributed 37 635 years of follow-up with 3337 incident pregnancies. In women using implants, adjusted pregnancy incidence was 1.1 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.72-1.5) for nevirapine-based ART users and 3.3 per 100 person-years (1.8-4.8) for efavirenz-based ART users (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-4.6). In women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, adjusted pregnancy incidence was 4.5 per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.7-5.2) for nevirapine-based ART users and 5.4 per 100 person-years (4.0-6.8) for efavirenz-based ART users (adjusted IRR 1.2, 95% CI 0.91-1.5). Women using other contraceptive methods, except for intrauterine devices and permanent methods, had 3.1-4.1 higher rates of pregnancy than did those using implants, with 1.6-2.8 higher rates in women using efavirenz-based ART.

Interpretation: Although HIV-positive women using implants and efavirenz-based ART had a three-times higher risk of contraceptive failure than did those using nevirapine-based ART, these women still had lower contraceptive failure rates than did those receiving all other contraceptive methods except for intrauterine devices and permanent methods. Guidelines for contraceptive and ART combinations should balance the failure rates for each contraceptive method and ART regimen combination against the high effectiveness of implants.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Contraceptive use by women living with HIV who wish to prevent pregnancy remains a key component of the strategy to eliminate new HIV infections among children. Progesterone-based implants are the most effective reversible contraceptive method, but there is some evidence to suggest that their efficacy may be reduced in women receiving efavirenz (EFV)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Overall contraceptive use in these women of childbearing age was low – 70% of the time women were using no contraception or less effective methods only (condoms or natural methods). Overall pregnancy rates were low with the hormonal implant, broadly equivalent to women with intrauterine devices and much lower than with depot injectable and oral contraceptive methods. There was some evidence that the rate of pregnancy in women using the implant was higher for women on EFV-based ART compared to women on nevirapine-based ART. However, the rate of pregnancy remained lower than with injectable or oral contraceptives.

Although this may provide some support to the evidence of reduced implant efficacy with EFV-based ART, it is clear that this can still be an effective contraceptive method. This evidence seems unlikely to change existing WHO recommendations that all forms of contraception should be available to women living with HIV. The low rate of contraceptive use highlights the need to improve access for women living with HIV to quality integrated sexual and reproductive health services. The data from this study suggest that for women wishing to avoid pregnancy, the choice of contraceptive method may be more important than the choice of ART regimen.  

Africa
Kenya
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Expanding ART access: increasing costs

The HIV treatment gap: estimates of the financial resources needed versus available for scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in 97 countries from 2015 to 2020.

Dutta A, Barker C, Kallarakal A. PLoS Med. 2015 Nov 24;12(11):e1001907. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001907. eCollection 2015.

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) released revised guidelines in 2015 recommending that all people living with HIV, regardless of CD4 count, initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) upon diagnosis. However, few studies have projected the global resources needed for rapid scale-up of ART. Under the Health Policy Project, we conducted modeling analyses for 97 countries to estimate eligibility for and numbers on ART from 2015 to 2020, along with the facility-level financial resources required. We compared the estimated financial requirements to estimated funding available.

Methods and findings: Current coverage levels and future need for treatment were based on country-specific epidemiological and demographic data. Simulated annual numbers of individuals on treatment were derived from three scenarios: (1) continuation of countries' current policies of eligibility for ART, (2) universal adoption of aspects of the WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and (3) expanded eligibility as per the WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS "90-90-90" ART targets. We modeled uncertainty in the annual resource requirements for antiretroviral drugs, laboratory tests, and facility-level personnel and overhead.

We estimate that 25.7 (95% CI 25.5, 26.0) million adults and 1.57 (95% CI 1.55, 1.60) million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain current eligibility plans and increase coverage based on historical rates, which may be ambitious. If countries uniformly adopt aspects of the WHO 2013 guidelines, 26.5 (95% CI 26.0 27.0) million adults and 1.53 (95% CI 1.52, 1.55) million children could be on ART by 2020. Under the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 (95% CI 30.1, 30.7) million adults and 1.68 (95% CI 1.63, 1.73) million children could receive treatment by 2020. The facility-level financial resources needed for scaling up ART in these countries from 2015 to 2020 are estimated to be US$45.8 (95% CI 45.4, 46.2) billion under the current scenario, US$48.7 (95% CI 47.8, 49.6) billion under the WHO 2013 scenario, and US$52.5 (95% CI 51.4, 53.6) billion under the 90-90-90 scenario. After projecting recent external and domestic funding trends, the estimated 6-y financing gap ranges from US$19.8 billion to US$25.0 billion, depending on the costing scenario and the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief contribution level, with the gap for ART commodities alone ranging from US$14.0 to US$16.8 billion. The study is limited by excluding above-facility and other costs essential to ART service delivery and by the availability and quality of country- and region-specific data.

Conclusions: The projected number of people receiving ART across three scenarios suggests that countries are unlikely to meet the 90-90-90 treatment target (81% of people living with HIV on ART by 2020) unless they adopt a test-and-offer approach and increase ART coverage. Our results suggest that future resource needs for ART scale-up are smaller than stated elsewhere but still significantly threaten the sustainability of the global HIV response without additional resource mobilization from domestic or innovative financing sources or efficiency gains. As the world moves towards adopting the WHO 2015 guidelines, advances in technology, including the introduction of lower-cost, highly effective antiretroviral regimens, whose value are assessed here, may prove to be "game changers" that allow more people to be on ART with the resources available.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This is a complex and important paper that seeks to understand the financial requirements necessary to: a) continue countries’ current policies of eligibility for ART, b) roll out universal adoption of certain aspects of WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and c) expand eligibility as per WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS ‘90-90-90’ targets.

The authors estimated the number of adults and children eligible for and receiving HIV treatment, as well as the cost of providing ART in 97 countries across six regions, covering different income levels. They estimated that 25.7 million adults and 1.57 million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain the current eligibility strategies. If countries adopted WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, 26.5 million adults and 1.53 million children would be on ART by 2020, and if they adopted the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 million adults and 1.68 million children could receive treatment by then. The financial resources necessary for this scale up are estimated to be US$ 45.8 billion under current eligibility, US$ 48.7 billion under WHO 2013 scenario and US$ 52.5 billion under the 90-90-90 scenario. The estimated funding gap for the six year period ranges between US$ 20 and US$ 25 billion. In this study, the costs of commodities were taken directly from data collated by other organisations.  No empirical cost estimates of service delivery were made.  Nor was there an attempt to understand the cost implications of the development synergies and social and programme enablers that may be needed to increase the number of people living with HIV knowing their status.  The new WHO recommendations need to be actively pursued if we are to meet targets, rather than passively continuing with “business as usual”. 

Nonetheless, the findings of this study highlight the gap between guidelines written by WHO and very real programmatic obstacles on the ground. There is evidence to suggest that universal test-and-treat strategies could lead to substantially improved health outcomes at the population level, as well as potentially being cost-saving in the long-term. However, as the authors have illustrated, it would require increased levels of funding. What needs to be explored further now is how to overcome the logistical hurdles of rolling out such an initiative. Changing systems and practices is costly and takes time. Health workers will have to be retrained, data collection strategies will have to be revised. Expanding treatment may also mean increasing the number of health staff working on this initiative, which has an opportunity cost that may reverberate in other parts of the health system. Substantially altering health service provision, particularly in weak health systems, may have knock-on effects with unexpected and unintended consequences.

WHO guidelines serve a vital purpose of giving us a goal to aim for. But studies like this one help us know if and how we can get there. 

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