Articles tagged as "Mali"

Switching to second-line ART – we need to do better

Monitoring and switching of first-line antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: collaborative analysis of adult treatment cohorts.

Haas AD, Keiser O, Balestre E, Brown S, Bissagnene E, Chimbetete C, Dabis F, Davies MA, Hoffmann CJ, Oyaro P, Parkes-Ratanshi R, Reynolds SJ, Sikazwe I, Wools-Kaloustian K, Zannou DM, Wandeler G, Egger M, for IeDea Southern Africa EA, West A. Lancet HIV. 2015 Jul 1;2(7):e271-e278.

Background: HIV-1 viral load testing is recommended to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) but is not universally available. The aim of our study was to assess monitoring of first-line ART and switching to second-line ART in sub-Saharan Africa.

Methods: We did a collaborative analysis of cohort studies from 16 countries in east Africa, southern Africa, and west Africa that participate in the international epidemiological database to evaluate AIDS (IeDEA). We included adults infected with HIV-1 who started combination ART between January, 2004, and January, 2013. We defined switching of ART as a change from a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen to one including a protease inhibitor, with adjustment of one or more nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Virological and immunological failures were defined according to WHO criteria. We calculated cumulative probabilities of switching and hazard ratios with 95% CIs comparing routine viral load monitoring, targeted viral load monitoring, CD4 monitoring, and clinical monitoring, adjusting for programme and individual characteristics.

Findings: Of 297 825 eligible patients, 10 352 (3%) switched to second-line ART during 782 412 person-years of follow-up. Compared with CD4 monitoring, hazard ratios for switching were 3·15 (95% CI 2·92–3·40) for routine viral load monitoring, 1·21 (1·13–1·30) for targeted viral load monitoring, and 0·49 (0·43–0·56) for clinical monitoring. Of 6450 patients with confirmed virological failure, 58·0% (95% CI 56·5–59·6) switched by 2 years, and of 15 892 patients with confirmed immunological failure, 19·3% (18·5–20·0) switched by 2 years. Of 10 352 patients who switched, evidence of treatment failure based on one CD4 count or viral load measurement ranged from 86 (32%) of 268 patients with clinical monitoring to 3754 (84%) of 4452 with targeted viral load monitoring. Median CD4 counts at switching were 215 cells per μL (IQR 117–335) with routine viral load monitoring, but were lower with other types of monitoring (range 114–133 cells per μL).

Interpretation: Overall, few patients switched to second-line ART and switching happened late in the absence of routine viral load monitoring. Switching was more common and happened earlier after initiation of ART with targeted or routine viral load testing.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Routine viral load monitoring should allow the early identification of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure, allowing prompt switch to second-line ART. Prolongation of treatment with a failing regimen compromises future therapeutic options (through the accumulation of drug resistance mutations) and potentially leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Previous reports from Africa have suggested that surprisingly few people switch to second-line therapy, even in programmes with routine viral load monitoring. This raises concerns that there are challenges on the ground with identification and management of ART failure.

This is a comprehensive analysis bringing together data from a number of well-characterised cohorts in Africa. In this analysis, switching to second-line ART was rare (3% over an average of almost three years follow-up). In programmes with routine viral load monitoring, only half of the people with confirmed virologic failure on first-line ART (two viral loads >1000 copies/ml) were recorded as having been switched to second-line ART. Furthermore, half of the people that were switched to a second-line regimen did not have evidence of confirmed virologic failure, suggesting that some may have been switched too early without first attempting adherence programmes which may achieve re-suppression on first-line ART. Unsurprisingly, rates of switching were lower in programmes with CD4+ monitoring (with or without targeted viral load testing) or clinical monitoring alone. 

While guidelines and algorithms around identification and management of first-line ART failure are relatively clear and straightforward, translating this into action on the ground seems to be difficult. At least part of this is likely to be due to the lack of tools to reliably measure adherence and the consequent difficulty that frontline health care workers have in identifying people that truly require a switch to second-line ART. Moreover, most programmes still do not routinely monitor indicators relating to virologic suppression or treatment failure and so this might not be seen as a priority by health care workers and programme managers. There is a need for research to explore how best to maximise virologic suppression in resource-constrained settings, as well as studies to evaluate the impact of programmes such as point-of-care viral load testing.

Africa
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Expansions in HIV treatment believed to reduce HIV stigma

HIV treatment scale-up and HIV-related stigma in sub-Saharan Africa: a longitudinal cross-country analysis.

Chan BT, Tsai AC, Siedner MJ. Am J Public Health. 2015 Jun 11:e1-e7. [Epub ahead of print] doi:10.2105/AJPH.2015.302716

Objectives: We estimated the association between antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake and HIV-related stigma at the population level in sub-Saharan Africa.

Methods: We examined trends in HIV-related stigma and ART coverage in sub-Saharan Africa during 2003 to 2013 using longitudinal, population-based data on ART coverage from the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS and on HIV-related stigma from the Demographic and Health Surveys and AIDS Indicator Surveys. We fitted 2 linear regression models with country fixed effects, with the percentage of men or women reporting HIV-related stigma as the dependent variable and the percentage of people living with HIV on ART as the explanatory variable.

Results: Eighteen countries in sub-Saharan Africa were included in our analysis. For each 1% increase in ART coverage, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of women (b = -0.226; P = .007; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.383, -0.070) and men (b = -0.281; P = .009; 95% CI = -0.480, -0.082) in the general population reporting HIV-related stigma.

Conclusions: An important benefit of ART scale-up may be the diminution of HIV-related stigma in the general population. .

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Focused on sub-Saharan Africa, this study suggests that a benefit of the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may have been a reduction in HIV-associated stigma. The authors combine data on HIV-associated stigma from the Demographic and Health Surveys and AIDS Indicator Surveys with data on ART coverage from UNAIDS. The results are presented for each of 18 countries and the authors suggest that increases in ART coverage are correlated with decreasing stigma, especially among countries with high HIV prevalence. The authors hypothesise that by allowing a person with HIV to experience a healthier life, ART reduces the stigma of HIV’s association with moral deviance. The authors also attribute knowledge to decreases in stigma.

While addressing an interesting and important question, the paper has some limitations. We suggest that participant responses to questions about whether they would be willing to care for someone “sick with AIDS”, and whether they would want a family member to keep an AIDS diagnosis “secret” cannot safely be interpreted as reflecting stigmatising attitudes or anticipated stigma. It would have been interesting to know if the methods used in the analysis could assess the role of ART relative to other factors in being associated with any changes over time in HIV-associated stigma.

Africa
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Late antiretroviral therapy start persists for children under two years of age in low- and middle-income countries

Immunodeficiency in children starting antiretroviral therapy in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.

Koller M, Patel K, Chi BH, Wools-Kaloustian K, Dicko F, Chokephaibulkit K, Chimbetete C, Avila D, Hazra R, Ayaya S, Leroy V, Truong HK, Egger M, Davies MA, IeDEA, NISDI, PHACS and IMPAACT 219C studies.  J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Jan 1;68(1):62-72. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000380.

Background: The CD4 cell count or percent (CD4%) at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is an important prognostic factor in children starting therapy and an important indicator of program performance. We describe trends and determinants of CD4 measures at cART initiation in children from low-, middle-, and high-income countries.

Methods: We included children aged <16 years from clinics participating in a collaborative study spanning sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the United States. Missing CD4 values at cART start were estimated through multiple imputation. Severe immunodeficiency was defined according to World Health Organization criteria. Analyses used generalized additive mixed models adjusted for age, country, and calendar year.

Results: A total of 34 706 children from 9 low-income, 6 lower middle-income, 4 upper middle-income countries, and 1 high-income country (United States) were included; 20 624 children (59%) had severe immunodeficiency. In low-income countries, the estimated prevalence of children starting cART with severe immunodeficiency declined from 76% in 2004 to 63% in 2010. Corresponding figures for lower middle-income countries were from 77% to 66% and for upper middle-income countries from 75% to 58%. In the United States, the percentage decreased from 42% to 19% during the period 1996 to 2006. In low- and middle-income countries, infants and children aged 12-15 years had the highest prevalence of severe immunodeficiency at cART initiation.

Conclusions: Despite progress in most low- and middle-income countries, many children continue to start cART with severe immunodeficiency. Early diagnosis and treatment of HIV-infected children to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with immunodeficiency must remain a global public health priority.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: This article describes trends and determinants of CD4 cell measures at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in about 35 000 children in low, middle, and high-income countries. Temporal trends in CD4 measures at ART initiation are a useful indicator of the health system’s ability to identify and treat eligible children in a timely fashion. They are also a useful measure of responsiveness to guideline changes.

Previous WHO guidelines recommended early ART initiation, regardless of immunologic or clinical thresholds. But the authors found that in 2010, approximately two-thirds of children below two years of age, in low- and middle-income countries were still starting ART with severe immunodeficiency.

Delayed country-level implementation of WHO guidelines, poor access to early infant diagnosis, slow turn-around time of test results, and limited ART availability for infants and young children are all contributing factors to this delayed ART initiation. The authors point out that timely diagnosis of paediatric HIV does not necessarily result in timely ART. The main reasons for this diagnosis to treatment gap include HIV diagnostic tests and paediatric ART being located at separate sites without robust referral mechanisms between services. There are challenges with CD4 measurement to determine eligibility. These include access to tests, turn-around time and interpretation of results and health care worker discomfort with treating children.

Currently, only 22% of children living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa are receiving ART. To decrease the treatment gap among children, WHO 2013 guidelines recommend universal ART for all children living with HIV, aged below five years of age, irrespective of CD4 count or clinical stage. Removing the requirement for a CD4 measurement also removes the time lag while waiting for CD4 results. Thus the guidelines aim both to increase treatment accessibility and to accelerate treatment initiation for all children. 

HIV Treatment
Africa, Asia, Northern America
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Associations between HIV and intimate partner violence in ten African countries

Intimate partner violence and HIV in ten sub-Saharan African countries: what do the Demographic and Health Surveys tell us?

Durevall D, Lindskog A. Lancet Glob Health. 2015 Jan;3(1):e34-43. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(14)70343-2. Epub 2014 Nov 21.

Background: Many studies have identified a significant positive relation between intimate partner violence and HIV in women, but adjusted analyses have produced inconsistent results. We systematically assessed the association, and under what condition it holds, using nationally representative data from ten sub-Saharan African countries, focusing on physical, sexual, and emotional violence, and on the role of male controlling behaviour.

Methods: We assessed cross-sectional data from 12 Demographic and Health Surveys from ten countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The data are nationally representative for women aged 15-49 years. We estimated odds ratios using logistic regression with and without controls for demographic and socioeconomic factors and survey-region fixed effects. Exposure was measured using physical, sexual, emotional violence, and male controlling behaviour, and combinations of these. The samples used were ever-married women, married women, and women in their first union. Depending on specification, the sample size varied between 11 231 and 45 550 women.

Findings: There were consistent and strong associations between HIV infection in women and physical violence, emotional violence, and male controlling behaviour (adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.2 to 1.7; p values ranged from <0.0001 to 0.0058). The evidence for an association between sexual violence and HIV was weaker and only significant in the sample with women in their first union. The associations were dependent on the presence of controlling behaviour and a high regional HIV prevalence rate; when women were exposed to only physical, sexual, or emotional violence, and no controlling behaviour, or when HIV prevalence rates are lower than 5%, the adjusted odds ratios were, in general, close to 1 and insignificant.

Interpretation: The findings indicate that male controlling behaviour in its own right, or as an indicator of ongoing or severe violence, puts women at risk of HIV infection. HIV prevention interventions should focus on high-prevalence areas and men with controlling behaviour, in addition to violence.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Despite two cohort studies illustrating that exposures to intimate partner violence are associated with incident HIV infection, evidence from cross-sectional analysis of population data is more mixed. Using Demographic and Health Surveys data for women aged 15-49 years from 10 sub-Saharan countries, this paper illustrates that HIV infection is strongly associated with physical violence and/or emotional violence and controlling behaviour, with a weaker association with sexual violence. For all forms of violence, the association was strongest among women who also reported that their partner was controlling, and in settings where HIV prevalence exceeds five percent. This study adds to the growing literature on HIV and intimate partner violence that suggests that risk is not only linked to forced sex, but rather to being in a violent and controlling relationship. The paper highlights the importance of male control as a risk factor for HIV, and supports the need for HIV prevention programmes that focus on reducing intimate partner violence in higher-prevalence settings.

Africa
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Feelings of regret after HIV status disclosure: prevalence, trends, and determinants

Was it a mistake to tell others that you are infected with HIV?: factors associated with regret following HIV disclosure among people living with HIV in five countries (Mali, Morocco, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador and Romania). Results from a community-based research.

Henry E, Bernier A, Lazar F, Matamba G, Loukid M, Bonifaz C, Diop S, Otis J, Préau M; The Partages study group. AIDS Behav. 2014 Dec 23. [Epub ahead of print]

This study examined regret following HIV serostatus disclosure and associated factors in under-investigated contexts (Mali, Morocco, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador and Romania). A community-based cross-sectional study was implemented by a mixed consortium [researchers/community-based organizations (CBO)]. Trained CBO members interviewed 1500 PLHIV in contact with CBOs using a 125-item questionnaire. A weighted multivariate logistic regression was performed. Among the 1212 participants included in the analysis, 290 (23.9 %) declared that disclosure was a mistake. Female gender, percentage of PLHIV's network knowing about one's seropositivity from a third party, having suffered rejection after disclosure, having suffered HIV-based discrimination at work, perceived seriousness of infection score, daily loneliness, property index and self-esteem score were independently associated with regret. Discrimination, as well as individual characteristics and skills may affect the disclosure experience. Interventions aiming at improving PLHIV skills and reducing their social isolation may facilitate the disclosure process and avoid negative consequences.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Anticipated and perceived consequences of disclosing one’s HIV status are recognized as important drivers for HIV disclosure. This community-based study looked at the experience of disclosing one’s HIV status, and the emotions that were associated with disclosure. The study was nested within a larger cross-sectional research project. 1500 people living with HIV (PLHIV) from Ecuador, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Mali, Romania, and Morocco were included in the study. Respondents were asked ‘Was it a mistake to tell others that you are infected with HIV?’ and to answer either ‘yes’ or ‘no.' Participants also responded to questions about the process of disclosure. Among people that had disclosed their status, some 23.9% said that it was a mistake to do so. Almost 40% of participants said that a person in their network learned about their status from a third party. More than 17% of participants responded that they faced rejection and eight percent of participants suffered discrimination at work following disclosure. But this varied greatly across countries. Factors associated with feeling regret after disclosing one’s status included being a female, perceived seriousness of HIV infection, and feeling lonely every day. This study highlights the fact that status disclosure can be emotional and stressful for people living with HIV. This suggests that people living with HIV must weigh the costs and benefits of disclosure before doing so and programmes that empower them to make informed decisions about disclosure may be beneficial. 

Africa, Europe, Latin America
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Increase in pregnancy rates in west Africa after initiation of antiretroviral therapy

Incidence of pregnancy after antiretroviral therapy initiation and associated factors in 8 West African countries.

Burgos-Soto J, Balestre E, Minga A, Ajayi S, Sawadogo A, Zannou MD, Leroy V, Ekouevi DK, Dabis F, Becquet R, IeDEA West Africa Collaboration. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2014 Oct 1;67(2):e45-54. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000279.

Introduction: This study aimed at estimating the incidence of pregnancy after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in 8 West African countries over a 10-year period.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted within the international database of the IeDEA West Africa Collaboration. All HIV-infected women aged <50 years and starting ART for their own health between 1998 and 2011 were eligible. Pregnancy after ART initiation was the main outcome and was based on clinical reporting. Poisson regression analysis accounting for country heterogeneity was computed to estimate first pregnancy incidence post-ART and to identify its associated factors. Pregnancy incidence rate ratios were adjusted on country, baseline CD4 count and clinical stage, hemoglobin, age, first ART regimen, and calendar year.

Results: Overall, 29 425 HIV-infected women aged 33 years in median (interquartile range, 28-38) contributed for 84 870 woman-years of follow-up to this analysis. The crude incidence of first pregnancy (2304 events) was 2.9 per 100 woman-years [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.7 to 3.0], the highest rate being reported among women aged 25-29 years: 4.7 per 100 woman-years; 95% CI: 4.3 to 5.1. The overall Kaplan-Meier probability of pregnancy occurrence by the fourth year on ART was 10.9% (95% CI: 10.4 to 11.4) and as high as 28.4% (95% CI: 26.3 to 30.6) among women aged 20-29 years at ART initiation.

Conclusions: The rate of pregnancy occurrence after ART initiation among HIV-infected women living in the West Africa region was high. Family planning services tailored to procreation needs should be provided to all HIV-infected women initiating ART and health consequences carefully monitored in this part of the world.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Women of reproductive age are the largest population affected by HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. The wide availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has considerably decreased morbidity and mortality among women living with HIV. In addition, the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV has also been reduced. The authors hypothesised that the improvement in life expectancy is positively associated with procreation desires and fertility rates observed after ART initiation in several other settings. To test this hypothesis, they conducted a retrospective analysis using data from the International epidemiological Database to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA). They found that the incidence of pregnancy was high after ART initiation among women living with HIV, although it was lower than among women without HIV in the same countries (four to six livebirths per 100 woman-years). The incidence rate of pregnancy increased slightly but progressively throughout years on ART, suggesting a positive effect of ART on fertility among women of reproductive age, particularly among young women. The authors suggest some biological mechanisms for the effect of ART on fertility. Further research in this area would be useful. Further, there is a large unmet need for family planning among women in west Africa, resulting in high rates of unintended pregnancies. This study highlights the need to understand the dynamics of fertility among women on ART, which is key to informing strategies integrating family planning into HIV care.

 
Africa
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Counting and classifying global deaths

Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

Murray CJ, Ortblad KF, Guinovart C, et al. Lancet. 2014 Sep 13;384(9947):1005-70. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60844-8. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Background: The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach to disease estimation for between 1990 and 2013, and an opportunity to assess whether accelerated progress has occurred since the Millennium Declaration.

Methods: To estimate incidence and mortality for HIV, we used the UNAIDS Spectrum model appropriately modified based on a systematic review of available studies of mortality with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). For concentrated epidemics, we calibrated Spectrum models to fit vital registration data corrected for misclassification of HIV deaths. In generalised epidemics, we minimised a loss function to select epidemic curves most consistent with prevalence data and demographic data for all-cause mortality. We analysed counterfactual scenarios for HIV to assess years of life saved through prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and ART. For tuberculosis, we analysed vital registration and verbal autopsy data to estimate mortality using cause of death ensemble modelling. We analysed data for corrected case-notifications, expert opinions on the case-detection rate, prevalence surveys, and estimated cause-specific mortality using Bayesian meta-regression to generate consistent trends in all parameters. We analysed malaria mortality and incidence using an updated cause of death database, a systematic analysis of verbal autopsy validation studies for malaria, and recent studies (2010-13) of incidence, drug resistance, and coverage of insecticide-treated bednets.

Findings: Globally in 2013, there were 1.8 million new HIV infections (95% uncertainty interval 1.7 million to 2.1 million), 29.2 million prevalent HIV cases (28.1 to 31.7), and 1.3 million HIV deaths (1.3 to 1.5). At the peak of the epidemic in 2005, HIV caused 1.7 million deaths (1.6 million to 1.9 million). Concentrated epidemics in Latin America and eastern Europe are substantially smaller than previously estimated. Through interventions including PMTCT and ART, 19.1 million life-years (16.6 million to 21.5 million) have been saved, 70.3% (65.4 to 76.1) in developing countries. From 2000 to 2011, the ratio of development assistance for health for HIV to years of life saved through intervention was US$ 4498 in developing countries. Including in HIV-positive individuals, all-form tuberculosis incidence was 7.5 million (7.4 million to 7.7 million), prevalence was 11.9 million (11.6 million to 12.2 million), and number of deaths was 1.4 million (1.3 million to 1.5 million) in 2013. In the same year and in only individuals who were HIV-negative, all-form tuberculosis incidence was 7.1 million (6.9 million to 7.3 million), prevalence was 11.2 million (10.8 million to 11.6 million), and number of deaths was 1.3 million (1.2 million to 1.4 million). Annualised rates of change (ARC) for incidence, prevalence, and death became negative after 2000. Tuberculosis in HIV-negative individuals disproportionately occurs in men and boys (versus women and girls); 64.0% of cases (63.6 to 64.3) and 64.7% of deaths (60.8 to 70.3). Globally, malaria cases and deaths grew rapidly from 1990 reaching a peak of 232 million cases (143 million to 387 million) in 2003 and 1.2 million deaths (1.1 million to 1.4 million) in 2004. Since 2004, child deaths from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa have decreased by 31.5% (15.7 to 44.1). Outside of Africa, malaria mortality has been steadily decreasing since 1990.

Interpretation: Our estimates of the number of people living with HIV are 18.7% smaller than UNAIDS's estimates in 2012. The number of people living with malaria is larger than estimated by WHO. The number of people living with HIV, tuberculosis, or malaria have all decreased since 2000. At the global level, upward trends for malaria and HIV deaths have been reversed and declines in tuberculosis deaths have accelerated. 101 countries (74 of which are developing) still have increasing HIV incidence. Substantial progress since the Millennium Declaration is an encouraging sign of the effect of global action.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study uses standard methods to compare and track over time national distributions of deaths by cause, and the prevalence of disease and disability.  This detailed report focuses on HIV, TB and Malaria. It presents regional summaries of incidence, prevalence and mortality rates, and national estimates of the number of male and female deaths and new infections. Point estimates are shown for 2013, and annualised rates of change for 1990-2000 and 2000-2013. These highlight the contrasting trends in disease impact before and after the formulation of the Millennium Development Goal to combat these diseases.  The global peak of HIV mortality occurred in 2005, but regional annualised rates of change for 2000-2013 indicate that HIV deaths are still increasing significantly in east Asia, southern Africa, and most rapidly in eastern Europe.

The GBD 2013 global estimates of new infections and deaths agree closely with the corresponding estimates made by UNAIDS. But there are significant differences in the respective estimates of the number of people currently living with HIV (UNAIDS estimates are some 18% higher), and historical trends in AIDS deaths, with UNAIDS judging that the recent fall has been steeper. These differences are attributed primarily to methods used in the GBD study to ensure that the sum of deaths from specific causes fits the estimated all cause total, and to varying assumptions about historical survival patterns following HIV infection. 

It may be worthwhile to look at a comment by Michel Sidibé, Mark Dybul, and Deborah Birx in the Lancet on MDG 6 and beyond: from halting and reversing AIDS to ending the epidemic which refers to this study.

Epidemiology
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palestinian Territory, Occupied, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe
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Integrating HIV, malaria and diarrhoea prevention is far more efficient than vertical programmes

Scaling up integrated prevention campaigns for global health: costs and cost-effectiveness in 70 countries. 

Marseille E, Jiwani A, Raut A, Verguet S, Walson J, Kahn JG. BMJ Open. 2014 Jun 26;4(6):e003987. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003987.

Objective: This study estimated the health impact, cost and cost-effectiveness of an integrated prevention campaign (IPC) focused on diarrhoea, malaria and HIV in 70 countries ranked by per capita disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) burden for the three diseases.

Methods: We constructed a deterministic cost-effectiveness model portraying an IPC combining counselling and testing, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, referral to treatment and condom distribution for HIV prevention; bed nets for malaria prevention; and provision of household water filters for diarrhoea prevention. We developed a mix of empirical and modelled cost and health impact estimates applied to all 70 countries. One-way, multiway and scenario sensitivity analyses were conducted to document the strength of our findings. We used a healthcare payer's perspective, discounted costs and DALYs at 3% per year and denominated cost in 2012 US dollars.

Primary and secondary outcomes: The primary outcome was cost-effectiveness expressed as net cost per DALY averted. Other outcomes included cost of the IPC; net IPC costs adjusted for averted and additional medical costs and DALYs averted.

Results: Implementation of the IPC in the 10 most cost-effective countries at 15% population coverage would cost US$583 million over 3 years (adjusted costs of US$398 million), averting 8.0 million DALYs. Extending IPC programmes to all 70 of the identified high-burden countries at 15% coverage would cost an adjusted US$51.3 billion and avert 78.7 million DALYs. Incremental cost-effectiveness ranged from US$49 per DALY averted for the 10 countries with the most favourable cost-effectiveness to US$119, US$181, US$335, US$1 692 and US$8 340 per DALY averted as each successive group of 10 countries is added ordered by decreasing cost-effectiveness.

Conclusions: IPC appears cost-effective in many settings, and has the potential to substantially reduce the burden of disease in resource-poor countries. This study increases confidence that IPC can be an important new approach for enhancing global health.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Increasingly governments and policy makers are seeking to identify how to invest resources most effectively, to achieve multiple health and development outcomes. This paper presents a cost-effectiveness analysis of an integrated campaign to prevent diarrhoea, malaria and HIV.  

They developed a model to estimate the cost per disability adjusted life year (DALY) averted by this intervention, across 70 countries with high disease burden, assuming 15% coverage. The authors categorise countries by income level and their opportunity index (i.e. the opportunity to avert DALYs by having a high disease burden). The findings suggest that an integrated prevention campaign (IPC) could cost as little as US$7 per DALY averted in Guinea-Bissau, a low income, high opportunity country. As would be expected, the contribution of the different IPC components varied by country, depending on their relative disease burdens. This suggests that further focusing of activities within countries may further improve efficiency.

The model was also used to consider potential roll out strategies across counties. For this, countries were grouped into blocks of 10, and ordered with increasing incremental-cost effectiveness. The authors suggest that reaching the top 40 countries with IPC, even at just 15% coverage, could achieve far greater health benefits, with a substantially lower budget, than requested under PEPFAR for antiretroviral therapy alone.

This paper provides further evidence of the need for a more integrated approach to improve population health across disease areas.

Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America
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Physical as well as sexual partner violence is associated with increased HIV risk

Intimate partner violence and HIV infection among women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Li Y, Marshall CM, Rees HC, Nunez A, Ezeanolue EE, Ehiri JE. 4 J Int AIDS Soc. 2014 Feb 13;17:18845. doi: 10.7448/IAS.17.1.18845. eCollection 2014.

Introduction: To assess evidence of an association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV infection among women.

Methods: Medline/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group's Specialized Register and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched up to 20 May 2013 to identify studies that examined the association between IPV and HIV infection in women. We included studies on women aged ≥15 years, in any form of sexually intimate relationship with a male partner.

Results: Twenty-eight studies [(19 cross-sectional, 5 cohorts and 4 case-control studies) involving 331 468 individuals in 16 countries - the US (eight studies), South Africa (four studies), East Africa (10 studies), India (three studies), Brazil (one study) and multiple low-income countries (two studies)] were included. Results were pooled using RevMan 5.0. To moderate effect estimates, we analyzed all data using the random effects model, irrespective of heterogeneity level. Pooled results of cohort studies indicated that physical IPV [pooled RR (95% CI): 1.22 (1.01, 1.46)] and any type of IPV [pooled RR (95% CI): 1.28 (1.00, 1.64)] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Results of cross-sectional studies demonstrated significant associations of physical IPV with HIV infection among women [pooled OR (95% CI): 1.44 (1.10, 1.87)]. Similarly, results of cross-sectional studies indicated that combination of physical and sexual IPV [pooled OR (95% CI): 2.00 (1.24, 3.22) and any type of IPV [pooled OR (95% CI): 1.41 (1.16, 1.73)] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women.

Conclusions: Available evidence suggests a moderate statistically significant association between IPV and HIV infection among women. To further elucidate the strength of the association between IPV and HIV infection among women, there is a need for high-quality follow-up studies conducted in different geographical regions of the world, and among individuals of diverse racial/cultural backgrounds and varying levels of HIV risks.

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Editor’s notes: Globally, an estimated 30% of partnered women will experience physical and/or sexual violence. As well as being a violation of human rights, there is growing evidence about the different ways in which violence and the fear of violence may limit women’s ability to prevent themselves from acquiring infection, or access services. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of current evidence on whether exposures to violence by an intimate partner increase women’s HIV risk. Commonly, debates on this issue focus on forced sex. The findings suggest that the issue is more complex – with exposures to physical violence also being associated with increased HIV risk. Exposures to both physical and sexual violence by partners, which is an indicator of more severe partner violence, found stronger effect estimates. The pathways underlying the documented associations may be multiple: as well as forced sex, women may have difficulties negotiating condom use or accessing services. Other studies have suggested that there may also be other characteristics of the relationship.  These are that men who are violent are also more likely to have other risk behaviours such as problematic alcohol use or multiple sexual partners. These result in them being more likely to be HIV positive than non-violent men. The findings suggest that violence prevention activities may reduce HIV risk. They also highlight the need to ensure that HIV services are sensitive to, and able to support, women who have experienced or fear violence.

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CD4 counts at antiretroviral therapy start rising globally, but could do better!

Immunodeficiency at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy in low-,  middle-, and high-income countries.

The IeDEA and ART Cohort Collaborations. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2014 Jan 1;65(1):e8-e16. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e3182a39979.

Objective: To describe the CD4 cell count at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in low-income (LIC), lower middle-income (LMIC), upper middle-income (UMIC), and high-income (HIC) countries.

Methods: Patients aged 16 years or older starting cART in a clinic participating in a multicohort collaboration spanning 6 continents (International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS and ART Cohort Collaboration) were eligible. Multilevel linear regression models were adjusted for age, gender, and calendar year; missing CD4 counts were imputed.

Results: In total, 379 865 patients from 9 LIC, 4 LMIC, 4 UMIC, and 6 HIC were included. In LIC, the median CD4 cell count at cART initiation increased by 83% from 80 to 145 cells/µL between 2002 and 2009. Corresponding increases in LMIC, UMIC, and HIC were from 87 to 155 cells/µL (76% increase), 88 to 135 cells/µL (53%), and 209 to 274 cells/µL (31%). In 2009, compared with LIC, median counts were 13 cells/µL [95% confidence interval (CI): -56 to +30] lower in LMIC, 22 cells/µL (-62 to +18) lower in UMIC, and 112 cells/µL (+75 to +149) higher in HIC. They were 23 cells/µL (95% CI: +18 to +28 cells/µL) higher in women than men. Median counts were 88 cells/µL (95% CI: +35 to +141 cells/µL) higher in countries with an estimated national cART coverage >80%, compared with countries with <40% coverage.

Conclusions: Median CD4 cell counts at the start of cART increased 2000-2009 but remained below 200 cells/µL in LIC and MIC and below 300 cells/µL in HIC. Earlier start of cART will require substantial efforts and resources globally.

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Editor’s notes: In this multi-cohort analysis spanning six continents, median CD4 counts at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy were substantially higher in high-income compared to low- or middle-income countries. Median CD4 counts at initiation increased between 2002 and 2009 in most countries studied, but these increases were greater in low- and middle-income than high-income countries and were greater among men than women. Baseline CD4 counts in low- and middle-income countries were higher among countries with national antiretroviral therapy coverage of 80% or above. Nevertheless, despite the massive scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries since 2002, the increases in median CD4 count at the start of antiretroviral therapy have been modest. Substantial efforts and resources are needed to achieve earlier implementation of antiretroviral therapy globally.

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