Articles tagged as "Poland"

Intrauterine infections, but not obstetric complications, more common among pregnant women with HIV

HIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 

Calvert C, Ronsmans C. PLoS One. 2013 Oct 4;8(10):e74848. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0074848.

Background: Women of reproductive age in parts of sub-Saharan Africa are faced both with high levels of HIV and the threat of dying from the direct complications of pregnancy. Clinicians practicing in such settings have reported a high incidence of direct obstetric complications among HIV-infected women, but the evidence supporting this is unclear. The aim of this systematic review is to establish whether HIV-infected women are at increased risk of direct obstetric complications.

Methods and findings: Studies comparing the frequency of obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia and intrauterine infections in HIV-infected and uninfected women were identified. Summary estimates of the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HIV and each obstetric complication were calculated through meta-analyses. In total, 44 studies were included providing 66 data sets; 17 on haemorrhage, 19 on hypertensive disorders, five on dystocia and 25 on intrauterine infections. Meta-analysis of the OR from studies including vaginal deliveries indicated that HIV-infected women had over three times the risk of a puerperal sepsis compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled OR: 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00-5.85]; this figure increased to nearly six amongst studies only including women who delivered by caesarean (pooled OR: 5.81, 95% CI: 2.42-13.97). For other obstetric complications the evidence was weak and inconsistent.

Conclusions: The higher risk of intrauterine infections in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women may require targeted strategies involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics during labour. However, as the huge excess of pregnancy-related mortality in HIV-infected women is unlikely to be due to a higher risk of direct obstetric complications, reducing this mortality will require non obstetric interventions involving access to ART in both pregnant and non-pregnant women.

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Editor’s notes: Women with HIV are thought to have a higher risk of adverse outcomes during pregnancy. This review is valuable in summarizing available data on this topic. Many of the included studies predated the wide availability of antiretroviral therapy. There was a clear association between HIV infection and intrauterine infections, but not with the other obstetric complications, e.g., obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia, examined in the review. Considering individual conditions analysed, HIV infection was associated with antepartum haemorrhage, (but not postpartum haemorrhage). It was also found to be associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (but not pre-eclampsia or eclampsia), and uterine rupture or prolonged labour (but not other complications of dystocia). The authors note that the studies were generally of low quality, and there were too few studies to examine the effect of antiretroviral therapy on these complications.  

Given the excess of intrauterine infections in women with HIV, the authors suggest that these might be preventable with prophylactic antibiotics. Overall, where causes of maternal mortality are documented, pregnant women with HIV are more likely to die of non-pregnancy related infections, than of obstetric complications. Specifically, non-pregnancy related infections are tuberculosis, pneumonia or meningitis. Pregnant women living with HIV need access to antenatal services and a skilled attendant at delivery. But, the top priority with respect to reducing maternal mortality is effective antiretroviral therapy.

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Missed opportunities for vaginal delivery among women with HIV in Europe

Missed opportunities among HIV-positive women to control viral replication during pregnancy and to have a vaginal delivery.

 Aebi-Popp K, Mulcahy F, Glass TR, Rudin C, Martinez de Tejada B, Bertisch B, Fehr J, Grawe C, Scheibner K, Rickenbach M, Hoesli I, Thorne C; for the European Collaborative Study in EuroCoord and the Swiss Mother & Child HIV Cohort Study., J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2013 Jul 9. [Epub ahead of print]

Introduction:  Most national guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Europe updated between 2001 and 2010 recommend vaginal deliveries for women with undetectable or very low viral load (VL). Our aim was to explore the impact of these new guidelines on the rates of vaginal deliveries among HIV-positive women in Europe.

Methods: In a pooled analysis of data on HIV-positive pregnant women enrolled in the Swiss Mother & Child HIV Cohort Study and the European Collaborative Study 2000 to 2010, deliveries were classified as occurring pre-or post-publication of national guidelines recommending vaginal delivery.

Results: Overall, 2 663 women with 3 013 deliveries were included from 10 countries; 28% women were diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy. Combination antiretroviral therapy was used in most pregnancies (2 020, 73%), starting during the first or second trimester in 78% and during the third trimester in 22%; in 25% pregnancies, the woman conceived on combination antiretroviral therapy. Overall, in 86% pregnancies, a VL < 400 copies per milliliter was achieved before delivery. The proportion of vaginal deliveries increased from 17% (414/2 377) before the change in guidelines to 52% (313/600) after; elective Caesarean section rates decreased from 65% to 27%. The proportion of women with undetectable VL having a Caesarean section was 55% after implementation of new guidelines. We observed a decrease of late preterm deliveries from 16% (377/2 354) before to 7% (42/599) after the change in guidelines (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: There are still missed opportunities for women with HIV to fully suppress their VL and to deliver vaginally in Europe.

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Editor’s notes: In 1999, following a randomised controlled trial showing a lower risk of vertical HIV transmission among babies delivered by elective Caesarean section, pregnant women with HIV were advised to deliver by elective Caesarean section where this option was available to them. In the last decade, accumulating observational data suggested that women taking combination ART with suppressed viral load who delivered vaginally were at very low risk of vertical transmission. This led to revised guidelines allowing vaginal delivery for women with suppressed viral load on combination ART.

This analysis of European data (with largest numbers contributed by Italy, Belgium and Switzerland) shows the increasing number of women having vaginal deliveries over the last decade. However, a substantial proportion of women had unsuppressed viral load at the time of delivery, and some received no ART prior to delivery, suggesting the need to engage pregnant women with HIV in care earlier.  In addition, the data suggest that more women who have suppressed viral load could safely undergo vaginal delivery.  The proportion of infants acquiring HIV infection in the period after introduction of guidelines allowing vaginal delivery was 0.6%, which is lower than 1.6% prior to the guideline change but suggests that further efforts are required to ensure that all children in Europe are born HIV-free.

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