Articles tagged as "South Africa"

Anal high-risk HPV and high-grade lesions: screening is required for women living with HIV

Prevalence of anal HPV and anal dysplasia in HIV-infected women from Johannesburg, South Africa.

Goeieman BJ, Firnhaber CS, Jong E, Michelow P, Swarts A, Williamson AL, Allan B, Smith JS, Kegorilwe P, Wilkin TJ. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2017 Jan 30. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001300. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Anal cancer is a relatively common cancer among HIV-infected populations. There are limited data on the prevalence of anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and anal dysplasia in HIV-infected women from resource-constrained settings.

Methods: A cross-sectional study of HIV-infected women age 25-65 recruited from an HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Cervical and anal swabs were taken for conventional cytology and HR-HPV testing. Women with abnormal anal cytology and 20% of women with negative cytology were seen for high resolution anoscopy (HRA) with biopsy of visible lesions.

Results: Two hundred women were enrolled. Anal HR-HPV was found in 43%. The anal cytology results were negative in 51 (26%); 97 (49%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), 32 (16%) had atypical squamous cells of unknown significance and 19 (9.5%) had high-grade SIL or atypical squamous cells suggestive of high-grade SIL. On HRA, 71 (36%) had atypia or low-grade SIL on anal histology and 17 (8.5%) had high-grade SIL. Overall 31 (17.5%) had high-grade SIL present on anal cytology or histology. Abnormal cervical cytology was found in 70% and cervical HR-HPV in 41%.

Conclusion: We found a significant burden of anal HR-HPV infection, abnormal anal cytology and high-grade SIL in our cohort. This is the first study of the prevalence of anal dysplasia in HIV-infected women from sub-Saharan Africa. Additional studies are needed to define the epidemiology of these conditions, as well as the incidence of anal cancer, in this population.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Women living with HIV have a higher incidence of anogenital cancers compared to HIV-negative women, even in the ART era. Previous studies have illustrated that women living with HIV in South Africa have a high risk of cervical high-risk (HR)-HPV, and high rates of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This is the first study to report the prevalence of anal HR-HPV and anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL+) among women living with HIV in Africa.

This cross-sectional study among 200 women living with HIV attending a HIV treatment centre in Johannesburg, South Africa, the majority (97%) of whom were on ART, reported a high  prevalence of anal HR-HPV and anal HSIL+ by high-resolution anoscopy (43% and 8.5%, respectively). Women with low current CD4+ cell count and with shorter duration of ART use had marginally higher prevalence of anal HR-HPV and HSIL+.

It remains unclear whether high-grade anal lesions among women living with HIV have the same propensity to progress to anal cancer as is known to occur for high-grade cervical lesions to cervical cancer. Studies among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men report frequent spontaneous regression of anal intraepithelial lesions (AIN) and high rates of recurrence following treatment, but longitudinal data are limited among women living with HIV. Prolonged ART use may have contributed to a reduction in HPV-associated cervical lesions, and the same could be true for anal lesions. Larger prospective studies are necessary to define the rates of high-grade lesion incidence and progression and associated risk factors among women living with HIV in order to guide screening and management decisions.  

Comorbidity, Epidemiology
Africa
South Africa
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Peer support: not a panacea for poor adherence

Use of peers to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a global network meta-analysis.

Kanters S, Park JJ, Chan K, Ford N, Forrest J, Thorlund K, Nachega JB, Mills EJ. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Nov 30;19(1):21141. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.21141. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: It is unclear whether using peers can improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To construct the World Health Organization's global guidance on adherence interventions, we conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of using peers for achieving adequate adherence and viral suppression.

Methods: We searched for randomized clinical trials of peer-based interventions to promote adherence to ART in HIV populations. We searched six electronic databases from inception to July 2015 and major conference abstracts within the last three years. We examined the outcomes of adherence and viral suppression among trials done worldwide and those specific to low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) using pairwise and network meta-analyses.

Results and discussion: Twenty-two trials met the inclusion criteria. We found similar results between pairwise and network meta-analyses, and between the global and LMIC settings. Peer supporter+Telephone was superior in improving adherence than standard-of-care in both the global network (odds-ratio [OR]=4.79, 95% credible intervals [CrI]: 1.02, 23.57) and the LMIC settings (OR=4.83, 95% CrI: 1.88, 13.55). Peer support alone, however, did not lead to improvement in ART adherence in both settings. For viral suppression, we found no difference of effects among interventions due to limited trials.

Conclusions: Our analysis showed that peer support leads to modest improvement in adherence. These modest effects may be due to the fact that in many settings, particularly in LMICs, programmes already include peer supporters, adherence clubs and family disclosures for treatment support. Rather than introducing new interventions, a focus on improving the quality in the delivery of existing services may be a more practical and effective way to improve adherence to ART.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Sustained adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical to ensure successful treatment outcomes and prevent drug resistance, AIDS-associated illness, death and onward transmission of HIV infection. In recent years, there has been much enthusiasm for use of peer support as a programme to improve adherence. Most high HIV prevalence settings have limited resources. Stigma influences adherence to treatment, and peer-based support may be a practical solution both in terms of being low cost and a mechanism for addressing stigma.

In this systematic review, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of peer-supporter programmes alone or in combination with other activities, namely telephone calls, device reminders or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), globally and in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). The systematic review findings were used to inform the 2015 World Health Organization HIV treatment guidelines.

The study demonstrates that peer support alone did not have any impact on adherence or on viral suppression. It did demonstrate modest improvements on adherence when combined with telephone activities. Several factors need to be considered in interpreting these findings. Firstly, adherence was assessed using a variety of methods including pill counts and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), which may have introduced heterogeneity. Secondly, few trials (particularly in LMICs) used HIV viral load as an outcome and therefore there may not have been adequate statistical power to detect an effect. Thirdly, populations included in the review were heterogeneous e.g. ART-naïve and experienced, people who inject drugs, non-adherent individuals. Notably, only one trial included children and adolescents among whom adherence is typically poorer. 

Importantly, in many settings particularly in LMICs, programmes already include treatment supporters and adherence clubs and therefore additional peer support would likely not add additional impact. The findings of this study suggest that programmes should focus on improving the quality of existing services rather than introduce new programmes. The review also highlights the need to standardise adherence measures and the need for robust research on adherence, particularly among children.         

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Thymidine analogue mutations associated with extensive resistance in African people failing on tenofovir

Occult HIV-1 drug resistance to thymidine analogues following failure of first-line tenofovir combined with a cytosine analogue and nevirapine or efavirenz in sub-Saharan Africa: a retrospective multi-centre cohort study.

Gregson J, Kaleebu P, Marconi VC, van Vuuren C, Ndembi N, Hamers RL, Kanki P, Hoffmann CJ, Lockman S, Pillay D, de Oliveira T, Clumeck N, Hunt G, Kerschberger B, Shafer RW, Yang C, Raizes E, Kantor R, Gupta RK. Lancet Infect Dis. 2016 Nov 30. pii: S1473-3099(16)30469-8. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30469-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: HIV-1 drug resistance to older thymidine analogue nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs has been identified in sub-Saharan Africa in patients with virological failure of first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing the modern nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of thymidine analogue mutations (TAM) in patients with virological failure of first-line tenofovir-containing ART.

Methods: We retrospectively analysed patients from 20 studies within the TenoRes collaboration who had locally defined viral failure on first-line therapy with tenofovir plus a cytosine analogue (lamivudine or emtricitabine) plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI; nevirapine or efavirenz) in sub-Saharan Africa. Baseline visits in these studies occurred between 2005 and 2013. To assess between-study and within-study associations, we used meta-regression and meta-analyses to compare patients with and without TAMs for the presence of resistance to tenofovir, cytosine analogue, or NNRTIs.

Findings: Of 712 individuals with failure of first-line tenofovir-containing regimens, 115 (16%) had at least one TAM. In crude comparisons, patients with TAMs had lower CD4 counts at treatment initiation than did patients without TAMs (60.5 cells per µL [IQR 21.0-128.0] in patients with TAMS vs 95.0 cells per µL [37.0-177.0] in patients without TAMs; p=0.007) and were more likely to have tenofovir resistance (93 [81%] of 115 patients with TAMs vs 352 [59%] of 597 patients without TAMs; p<0.0001), NNRTI resistance (107 [93%] vs 462 [77%]; p<0.0001), and cytosine analogue resistance (100 [87%] vs 378 [63%]; p=0.0002). We detected associations between TAMs and drug resistance mutations both between and within studies; the correlation between the study-level proportion of patients with tenofovir resistance and TAMs was 0.64 (p<0.0001), and the odds ratio for tenofovir resistance comparing patients with and without TAMs was 1.29 (1.13-1.47; p<0.0001)

Interpretation: TAMs are common in patients who have failure of first-line tenofovir-containing regimens in sub-Saharan Africa, and are associated with multidrug resistant HIV-1. Effective viral load monitoring and point-of-care resistance tests could help to mitigate the emergence and spread of such strains.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Since 2012, WHO has recommended that tenofovir should be included in first-line antiretroviral therapy, in place of the thymidine analogues, zidovudine and stavudine, which have more significant adverse effects. When therapy fails to maintain virologic control, tenofovir is associated with characteristic resistance mutations that are different from the thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) associated with the older drugs. This study looked at the resistance patterns of people in Africa with virologic failure after starting on WHO recommended first-line combination including tenofovir and a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI).  TAMs were surprisingly common (16%) for a group who were not known to have received thymidine analogues. This is not what would be expected from this drug combination. The implication is that TAMs may have been present before tenofovir-containing treatment was started, possibly because of undeclared previous therapy. It is well known that TAMs make subsequent therapy with an NNRTI and nucleoside analogues very much more likely to fail. The presence of TAMs was associated with more extensive resistance to other drugs including lamivudine and NNRTIs, some of which may also have been present before the tenofovir based treatment.

Only people with treatment failure were studied. The total number entering into treatment is not recorded. However, based on other reports in Africa the authors speculate a failure rate of 15 to 35% and that they may therefore have found TAMs in two to six percent of people who started treatment. That seems a realistic figure for undeclared prior treatment and gives some perspective to the scale of this problem.

There is continuing concern about drug resistance in low- and middle-income countries.  As the thymidine analogues are phased out, people receiving them may be switched to tenofovir. In situations where there is no access to viral load monitoring, some people will have unrecognised virologic failure and may have developed resistance including TAMs. They are then likely to fail on tenofovir with additional resistance. Realistic strategies are necessary for the prompt detection of treatment failure.

Africa
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ART has dramatically improved life expectancy for people living with HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Trends in the burden of HIV mortality after roll-out of antiretroviral therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: an observational community cohort study.

Reniers G, Blom S, Calvert C, Martin-Onraet A, Herbst AJ, Eaton JW, Bor J, Slaymaker E, Li ZR, Clark SJ, Barnighausen T, Zaba B, Hosegood V Lancet HIV. 2016 Dec 9. pii: S2352-3018(16)30225-9. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30225-9

Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) substantially decreases morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. In this study, we describe population-level trends in the adult life expectancy and trends in the residual burden of HIV mortality after the roll-out of a public sector ART programme in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, one of the populations with the most severe HIV epidemics in the world.

Methods: Data come from the Africa Centre Demographic Information System (ACDIS), an observational community cohort study in the uMkhanyakude district in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We used non-parametric survival analysis methods to estimate gains in the population-wide life expectancy at age 15 years since the introduction of ART, and the shortfall of the population-wide adult life expectancy compared with that of the HIV-negative population (ie, the life expectancy deficit). Life expectancy gains and deficits were further disaggregated by age and cause of death with demographic decomposition methods.

Findings: Covering the calendar years 2001 through to 2014, we obtained information on 93 903 adults who jointly contribute 535 428 person-years of observation to the analyses and 9992 deaths. Since the roll-out of ART in 2004, adult life expectancy increased by 15.2 years for men (95% CI 12.4-17.8) and 17.2 years for women (14.5-20.2). Reductions in pulmonary tuberculosis and HIV-related mortality account for 79.7% of the total life expectancy gains in men (8.4 adult life-years), and 90.7% in women (12.8 adult life-years). For men, 9.5% is the result of a decline in external injuries. By 2014, the life expectancy deficit had decreased to 1.2 years for men (-2.9 to 5.8) and to 5.3 years for women (2.6-7.8). In 2011-14, pulmonary tuberculosis and HIV were responsible for 84.9% of the life expectancy deficit in men and 80.8% in women.

Interpretation: The burden of HIV on adult mortality in this population is rapidly shrinking, but remains large for women, despite their better engagement with HIV-care services. Gains in adult life-years lived as well as the present life expectancy deficit are almost exclusively due to differences in mortality attributed to HIV and pulmonary tuberculosis.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) sites allow for monitoring of population health through the collection of detailed data on tens of thousands of individuals. Such sites in countries with high HIV prevalence have played an important role in measuring the effects of large-scale programmes, such as the global roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The data presented in this paper, from the Africa Centre Demographic Information System (ACDIS) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, span 13 years (2001–14) and represent over 93 000 individuals living in an area with extremely high HIV prevalence (29% in adults aged 15–49 years in 2011). At least 15 000 of people studied were HIV-positive, of whom at least 2000 died. ART was first made available to people living with HIV (PLHIV) in this area in 2004.

Among adults aged 15–49 years, the authors report an overall reduction in death rate from 2001–14.  This translates into large increases in life expectancy (i.e., the expected number of years lived from age 15) of 15 and 17 years for men and women, respectively, between 2001 and 2014.  The changes in life expectancy are greater in people who were confirmed HIV-positive: 18 and 21 years for men and women, respectively, from 2007–14.  The large difference in life expectancies between the sexes that still exists (31 versus 44 years in HIV-positive men and women, respectively) are consistent with previously published estimates from Rwanda and Uganda. This study, however, illustrates that HIV-positive men are catching up to their HIV-negative counterparts faster than women are. The ‘deficit’ in 2014 - the gap in life expectancies between HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, was 1.2 years in men but still 5.3 years in women.

The authors propose that increased access to ART is the primary driver of the gains in life expectancy seen in this cohort. To further support this, they include data from verbal autopsies (VAs), which suggest that reductions in deaths due to HIV and pulmonary tuberculosis were responsible for 80% and 90% of the increases in life expectancy in men and women, respectively. VAs have limitations, however, particularly in areas of high HIV prevalence, but the overall mortality patterns suggested by these findings are likely to be accurate, even if the precise estimates differ.

The dramatic increases in life expectancy, in only seven years, for HIV-positive individuals in this cohort add to the encouraging observations from other low- and middle-income countries that many people receiving ART can expect to live for nearly as long as HIV-negative individuals.  Of course, people with advanced disease starting ART are still at high risk of death and there remain considerable challenges in getting treatment to all people in need of it. 

Africa
South Africa
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A step forward for HIV prevention in women

Safety and efficacy of a dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV prevention in women.

Nel A, van Niekerk N, Kapiga S, Bekker LG, Gama C, Gill K, Kamali A, Kotze P, Louw C, Mabude Z, Miti N, Kusemererwa S, Tempelman H, Carstens H, Devlin B, Isaacs M, Malherbe M, Mans W, Nuttall J, Russell M, Ntshele S, Smit M, Solai L, Spence P, Steytler J, Windle K, Borremans M, Resseler S, Van Roey J, Parys W, Vangeneugden T, Van Baelen B, Rosenberg Z; Ring Study Team. N Engl J Med. 2016 Dec;375(22):2133-2143.

Background: The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains high among women in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of extended use of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine for the prevention of HIV infection in 1959 healthy, sexually active women, 18 to 45 years of age, from seven communities in South Africa and Uganda.

Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned participants in a 2:1 ratio to receive vaginal rings containing either 25 mg of dapivirine or placebo. Participants inserted the rings themselves every 4 weeks for up to 24 months. The primary efficacy end point was the rate of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) seroconversion.

Results: A total of 77 participants in the dapivirine group underwent HIV-1 seroconversion during 1888 person-years of follow-up (4.1 seroconversions per 100 person-years), as compared with 56 in the placebo group who underwent HIV-1 seroconversion during 917 person-years of follow-up (6.1 seroconversions per 100 person-years). The incidence of HIV-1 infection was 31% lower in the dapivirine group than in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49 to 0.99; P=0.04). There was no significant difference in efficacy of the dapivirine ring among women older than 21 years of age (hazard ratio for infection, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.97) and those 21 years of age or younger (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.60; P=0.43 for treatment-by-age interaction). Among participants with HIV-1 infection, nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were detected in 14 of 77 participants in the dapivirine group (18.2%) and in 9 of 56 (16.1%) in the placebo group. Serious adverse events occurred more often in the dapivirine group (in 38 participants [2.9%]) than in the placebo group (in 6 [0.9%]). However, no clear pattern was identified.

Conclusions: Among women in sub-Saharan Africa, the dapivirine ring was not associated with any safety concerns and was associated with a rate of acquisition of HIV-1 infection that was lower than the rate with placebo. (Funded by the International Partnership for Microbicides; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01539226 .).

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The need to develop safe, effective tools for women, particularly young women and adolescent girls, remains a high priority in sub-Saharan Africa. Self-inserted vaginal rings, which provide sustained release of antiretroviral drugs over time, offer an option that women can initiate themselves. Two large randomised trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine in preventing HIV infection in women. This trial is published in the same issue of the New England Journal of Medicine as the trial by Baeten et al. (reviewed by HIV This Month in March 2016). Both trials were conducted in eastern and southern Africa where the incidence of HIV remains high.

As in the Baeten trial, this trial found a moderate reduction in HIV infection (31% lower) among women using the dapivirine vaginal ring compared with placebo. In both trials, protection was higher among women older than 21 years of age, although, unlike the Baeten trial, the difference in efficacy between the two age groups in this trial was not statistically significant. Baeten et al noted that biological measurement of adherence was higher among women older than 21 years (more than 70% overall) which may partly explain the higher protection observed. The investigators of both trials note that the genital tract of younger women may make them more susceptible to HIV infection. This warrants further investigation. Differences in the frequency of vaginal and/or anal sex across different age groups may also be important. In an editorial to accompany publication of these two important trials, Adimora notes that “providers and women must ensure that the HIV interventions that women adopt match their sexual behaviours and needs. Different women – and women at different life stages – will require different types of HIV prevention.”  

Africa
South Africa, Uganda
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Study finds rectal gel to be safe in men, but not as acceptable for daily use

MTN-017: a rectal phase 2 extended safety and acceptability study of tenofovir reduced-glycerin 1% gel.

Cranston RD, Lama JR, Richardson BA, Carballo-Dieguez A, Kunjara Na Ayudhya RP, Liu K, Patterson KB, Leu CS, Galaska B, Jacobson CE, Parikh UM, Marzinke MA, Hendrix CW, Johnson S, Piper JM, Grossman C, Ho KS, Lucas J, Pickett J, Bekker LG, Chariyalertsak S, Chitwarakorn A, Gonzales P, Holtz TH, Liu AY, Mayer KH, Zorrilla C, Schwartz JL, Rooney J, McGowan I; MTN-017 Protocol Team. Clin Infect Dis. 2016 Dec 16. pii: ciw832. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: HIV disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). Safe and acceptable topical HIV prevention methods that target the rectum are needed.

Methods: MTN-017 was a Phase 2, three-period, randomized sequence, open-label, expanded safety and acceptability crossover study comparing rectally applied reduced-glycerin (RG) 1% tenofovir (TFV) and oral emtricitabine/TFV disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF). In each 8-week study period participants were randomized to RG-TFV rectal gel daily; or RG-TFV rectal gel before and after receptive anal intercourse (RAI) (or at least twice weekly in the event of no RAI); or daily oral FTC/TDF.

Results: MSM and TGW (n=195) were enrolled from 8 sites in the United States, Thailand, Peru, and South Africa with mean age of 31.1 years (range 18-64). There were no differences in Grade 2 or higher adverse event rates in participants using daily gel (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR): 1.09, p=0.59) or RAI gel (IRR: 0.90, p=0.51) compared to FTC/TDF. High adherence (≥80% of prescribed doses as assessed by unused product return and SMS reports) was less likely in the daily gel regimen (Odds Ratio (OR): 0.35, p<0.001) and participants reported less likelihood of future daily gel use for HIV protection compared to FTC/TDF (OR: 0.38, p<0.001).

Conclusions: Rectal application of RG TFV gel was safe in MSM and TGW. Adherence and product use likelihood were similar for the intermittent gel and daily oral FTC/TDF regimens, but lower for the daily gel regimen.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: While microbicide gel to prevent HIV in women has not been consistently shown to be effective, scientific efforts to develop a rectal microbicide gel have continued in the hopes of finding a safe and effective product for HIV prevention in men. This paper presents a phase II clinical trial in which gay men and other men who have sex with men across four different countries were randomly assigned to one of three arms: oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (‘daily oral’), topical gel administered before and after receptive anal intercourse (‘RAI’), and topical gel administered daily (‘daily rectal’). The authors found that the rectal gel was safe to use, and was acceptable to participants, although the daily rectal application had lower acceptability and lower adherence than daily oral or the RAI.  This safety, adherence, and acceptability seen in this Phase II study supports further development of the gel as a rectal microbicide candidate, although consideration will need to be given to dosing regimens to maximize adherence. 

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Lies in clinical trials – the truth about data accuracy

Misreporting of product adherence in the MTN-003/VOICE trial for HIV prevention in Africa: participants' explanations for dishonesty.

Montgomery ET, Mensch B, Musara P, Hartmann M, Woeber K, Etima J, van der Straten. AIDS Behav. 2016 Nov 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Consistent over-reporting of product use limits researchers' ability to accurately measure adherence and estimate product efficacy in HIV prevention trials. While lying is a universal characteristic of the human condition, growing evidence of a stark discrepancy between self-reported product use and biologic or pharmacokinetic evidence demands examination of the reasons research participants frequently misrepresent product use in order to mitigate this challenge in future research. This study (VOICE-D) was an ancillary post-trial study of the vaginal and oral interventions to control the epidemic (VOICE) phase IIb trial (MTN 003). It was conducted in three African countries to elicit candid accounts from former VOICE trial participants about why actual product use was lower than reported. In total 171 participants were enrolled between December 2012 and March 2014 in South Africa (n = 47), Uganda (n = 59) and Zimbabwe (n = 65). Data suggested that participants understood the importance of daily product use and honest reporting, yet acknowledged that research participants typically lie. Participants cited multiple reasons for misreporting adherence, including human nature, self-presentation with study staff, fear of repercussions (study termination resulting in loss of benefits and experience of HIV-related stigma), a permissive environment in which it was easy to get away with misreporting, and avoiding inconvenient additional counseling. Some participants also reported mistrust of the staff and reciprocal dishonesty about the study products. Many suggested real-time blood-monitoring during trials would encourage greater fidelity to product use and honesty in reporting. Participants at all sites understood the importance of daily product use and honesty, while also acknowledging widespread misreporting of product use. Narratives of dishonesty may suggest a wider social context of hiding products from partners and distrust about research, influenced by rumors circulating in clinic waiting-rooms and surrounding communities. Prevailing power hierarchies between staff and participants may exacerbate misreporting. Participants recognized and suggested that objective, real-time feedback is needed to encourage honest reporting.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: The authors of this insightful paper set out the reasons women gave in a trial of vaginal and oral programmes for inaccurately reporting their behaviour during the trial.  The authors could conduct this study because biologic/pharmacokinetic data were available which showed evidence of product use. These data were shared with individual women. None of the reasons women gave for not telling the truth is surprising. They lied to avoid additional questioning from research staff.  They feared telling the truth would result in being removed from the trial. They feared beingreprimanded. Overall, not telling the truth about product use helped them save face and time. The findings do highlight the power difference between researchers and researched, something that is hard to avoid in many areas of research. This difference was exacerbated in some circumstances by the (reported) harsh behaviour of staff towards women. The ease with which women could manipulate pill counts or product use checks, by discarding unused product is also not surprising.  The perception by some women that the researchers had lied, because of changes in the trial part way through, is important to note. This highlights the importance of clear information when a trial is explained as it begins. It also points to the importance of continuous explanations and checking participant understanding. It cannot be assumed that there is a shared understanding between researcher and researched. This is something that is easily overlooked as a trial progresses and routine visits are established. The authors highlight the value of objective measures on product use.  They also observe that some participants suggested objective, real-time feedback, during trials.  However, the authors also note that for many women lying about aspects of their lives to partners and family, was a way of managing their lives. It could be that ‘real time feedback’ would act as a deterrent to participation for some in such circumstances.  No system of data collection is perfect.  It is, however, very useful to have a timely reminder that no interview data, however collected, can be assumed to be wholly accurate.    

Africa
South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe
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Improving ART adherence: what works?

Interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Kanters S, Park JJ, Chan K, Socias ME, Ford N, Forrest JI, Thorlund K, Nachega JB, Mills EJ. Lancet HIV. 2017 Jan;4(1):e31-e40. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30206-5. Epub 2016 Nov 16.

Background: High adherence to antiretroviral therapy is crucial to the success of HIV treatment. We evaluated comparative effectiveness of adherence interventions with the aim of informing the WHO's global guidance on interventions to increase adherence.

Methods: For this systematic review and network meta-analysis, we searched for randomised controlled trials of interventions that aimed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens in populations with HIV. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and MEDLINE for reports published up to July 16, 2015, and searched major conference abstracts from Jan 1, 2013, to July 16, 2015. We extracted data from eligible studies for study characteristics, interventions, patients' characteristics at baseline, and outcomes for the study populations of interest. We used network meta-analyses to compare adherence and viral suppression for all study settings (global network) and for studies in low-income and middle-income countries only (LMIC network).

Findings: We obtained data from 85 trials with 16 271 participants. Short message service (SMS; text message) interventions were superior to standard of care in improving adherence in both the global network (odds ratio [OR] 1.48, 95% credible interval [CrI] 1.00-2.16) and in the LMIC network (1.49, 1.04-2.09). Multiple interventions showed generally superior adherence to single interventions, indicating additive effects. For viral suppression, only cognitive behavioural therapy (1.46, 1.05-2.12) and supporter interventions (1.28, 1.01-1.71) were superior to standard of care in the global network; none of the interventions improved viral response in the LMIC network. For the global network, the time discrepancy (whether the study outcome was measured during or after intervention was withdrawn) was an effect modifier for both adherence to antiretroviral therapy (coefficient estimate -0.43, 95% CrI -0.75 to -0.11) and viral suppression (-0.48; -0.84 to -0.12), suggesting that the effects of interventions wane over time.

Interpretation: Several interventions can improve adherence and viral suppression; generally, their estimated effects were modest and waned over time.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Maintaining adherence to self-administered medications is difficult. On average, people who are prescribed medications for chronic diseases take fewer than half the prescribed doses. Evidence suggests that in most settings adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is better than this, but there will always be people that struggle to maintain the high levels of adherence required for durable virologic suppression. In this analysis, there was some evidence that specific activities or combinations of activities improved virologic suppression. However, the effect sizes were small and when the analysis was confined to studies in low-income and middle-income countries, there was no evidence to suggest an effect on virologic suppression. Overall the evidence to support any particular activity or combination of activities was not compelling.     

Findings from this analysis have been incorporated into most recent consolidated ART guidelines from the World Health Organization. Trying to summarize complex evidence in this way creates many challenges. Trials were conducted in different populations. Some with all people starting ART, others with people considered to have high risk of suboptimal adherence, and others with people who already had adherence problems. The trials also naturally would have differed in content and quality of the usual package of care to support adherence (the comparator for most programme). 60% of the trials were conducted exclusively in the United States, while others were conducted across different settings.

These are just some of the things that make it difficult to synthesize this evidence into guidance that can be applicable to people living with HIV worldwide. HIV programmes in countries have to decide whether or not to adopt any of these activities that are recommended by WHO on the basis of relatively weak evidence. Would we expect activities aimed at improving adherence to be generalizable across different settings? One might argue probably not. Adherence is a multifactorial, dynamic process and there is unlikely to be a ‘one size fits all’ approach to supporting adherence. In the absence of better evidence for any specific activity, we should perhaps focus on improving the quality of the basic package of adherence support offered to all people receiving ART, while also developing better ways to identify when certain people might benefit from enhanced support.        

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Rape and ARV uptake/adherence

Impact of sexual trauma on HIV care engagement: perspectives of female patients with trauma histories in Cape Town, South Africa.

Watt MH, Dennis AC, Choi KW, Ciya N, Joska JA, Robertson C, Sikkema KJ. AIDS Behav. 2016 Nov 19. [Epub ahead of print]

South African women have disproportionately high rates of both sexual trauma and HIV. To understand how sexual trauma impacts HIV care engagement, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 15 HIV-infected women with sexual trauma histories, recruited from a public clinic in Cape Town. Interviews explored trauma narratives, coping behaviors and care engagement, and transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparison method. Participants reported multiple and complex traumas across their lifetimes. Sexual trauma hindered HIV care engagement, especially immediately following HIV diagnosis, and there were indications that sexual trauma may interfere with future care engagement, via traumatic stress symptoms including avoidance. Disclosure of sexual trauma was limited; no woman had disclosed to an HIV provider. Routine screening for sexual trauma in HIV care settings may help to identify individuals at risk of poor care engagement. Efficacious treatments are needed to address the psychological and behavioral sequelae of trauma.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Few studies have examined the impact of violence exposure on ART uptake and adherence. There is also a paucity of studies from low- and middle-income countries. South African women face a dual burden of HIV and violence risk, especially in areas characterized by extreme poverty, substance abuse and gender inequality. This study used qualitative interviews with 15 women living with HIV with histories of sexual trauma and attending an HIV-treatment clinic. The authors explore the intersections between sexual trauma experience, HIV infection and engagement with HIV care services.

Women reported complex sexual trauma histories, with repeated abuse from childhood into adulthood. This abuse was usually from family members or ‘lovers’. Sexual violence was usually accompanied by physical and emotional abuse. Women described symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Many associated their HIV infection with their sexual trauma / abusive relationship(s). For some, the HIV diagnosis and taking treatment reminded them of their rape and triggered feelings of shame. Women described their sexual violence experience as more stressful and shameful than their HIV status. None had disclosed their trauma history to their HIV care provider. The findings from this study suggest that women with a sexual trauma history may have poorer uptake and adherence to ARVs than women without. Additional research is necessary in low- and middle-income countries to explore this further. There is insufficient support and counselling services for women who have experienced sexual trauma and other abuse. Implementing such services may relieve symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression and support ART uptake and adherence. 

Africa
South Africa
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Conditional cash transfers had no effect on HIV in high school attendance setting

The effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence in young women in rural South Africa (HPTN 068): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial.

Pettifor A, MacPhail C, Hughes JP, Selin A, Wang J, Gomez-Olive FX, Eshleman SH, Wagner RG, Mabuza W, Khoza N, Suchindran C, Mokoena I, Twine R, Andrew P, Townley E, Laeyendecker O, Agyei Y, Tollman S, Kahn K. Lancet Glob Health. 2016 Dec;4(12):e978-e988. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(16)30253-4. Epub 2016 Nov 1.

Background: Cash transfers have been proposed as an intervention to reduce HIV-infection risk for young women in sub-Saharan Africa. However, scarce evidence is available about their effect on reducing HIV acquisition. We aimed to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence among young women in rural South Africa.

Methods: We did a phase 3, randomised controlled trial (HPTN 068) in the rural Bushbuckridge subdistrict in Mpumalanga province, South Africa. We included girls aged 13-20 years if they were enrolled in school grades 8-11, not married or pregnant, able to read, they and their parent or guardian both had the necessary documentation necessary to open a bank account, and were residing in the study area and intending to remain until trial completion. Young women (and their parents or guardians) were randomly assigned (1:1), by use of numbered sealed envelopes containing a randomisation assignment card which were numerically ordered with block randomisation, to receive a monthly cash transfer conditional on school attendance (≥80% of school days per month) versus no cash transfer. Participants completed an Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI), before test HIV counselling, HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 testing, and post-test counselling at baseline, then at annual follow-up visits at 12, 24, and 36 months. Parents or guardians completed a Computer-Assisted Personal Interview at baseline and each follow-up visit. A stratified proportional hazards model was used in an intention-to-treat analysis of the primary outcome, HIV incidence, to compare the intervention and control groups. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01233531).

Findings: Between March 5, 2011, and Dec 17, 2012, we recruited 10 134 young women and enrolled 2537 and their parents or guardians to receive a cash transfer programme (n=1225) or not (control group; n=1223). At baseline, the median age of girls was 15 years (IQR 14-17) and 672 (27%) had reported to have ever had sex. 107 incident HIV infections were recorded during the study: 59 cases in 3048 person-years in the intervention group and 48 cases in 2830 person-years in the control group. HIV incidence was not significantly different between those who received a cash transfer (1.94% per person-years) and those who did not (1.70% per person-years; hazard ratio 1.17, 95% CI 0.80-1.72, p=0.42).

Interpretation: Cash transfers conditional on school attendance did not reduce HIV incidence in young women. School attendance significantly reduced risk of HIV acquisition, irrespective of study group. Keeping girls in school is important to reduce their HIV-infection risk. 

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Cash transfers to vulnerable household and/or individuals have been used successfully in a variety of settings as a means to reduce poverty, improve health and achieve other development-associated outcomes. Cash transfers can help address structural drivers of HIV, such as economic and gender inequalities and low levels of education, and have been proposed as a potentially important addition to HIV prevention efforts. However, the evidence of their effectiveness in the context of HIV prevention is mixed. This study is the first randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of cash transfers conditional on school attendance with HIV incidence in adolescent girls and young women in sub-Saharan Africa. The trial found no evidence that receipt of the conditional cash transfer reduced HIV or HSV-2 incidence.

Staying in education has been highlighted as a key factor for reducing the risk of HIV infection in girls and young women. In this setting, school attendance based on attendance registers was high in both trial arms (95%). This is much higher than in South Africa overall, and higher than in Mpumalanga Province (the study area). Eligibility for the trial was restricted to girls and young women who were currently enrolled in school, so the trial participants may have been more motivated to attend school than those who were not eligible. Interestingly, 75% of individuals who were screened for the trial were found to be ineligible, although the reasons for their exclusion are not given, and it is difficult to know how generalizable the results are. South Africa has a strong social protection system for poor families, and 80% of the study participants were from households that were receiving child support grants. The benefits of additional cash transfers in areas with high coverage of social protection may be minimal. Cash transfers to girls and young women for HIV prevention are likely to have a greater effect in settings with low school attendance and more limited social protection coverage.

Consistent with other studies, the trial found that staying in school was associated with a reduced risk of HIV, irrespective of trial arm. The cash transfer was also associated with a strongly reduced risk of intimate partner violence, and a small effect on reducing some sexual risk behaviours. Cash transfers may work both directly and indirectly, through a variety of different pathways that are likely to vary between settings and between populations. The high-recorded school attendance in both trial arms will have limited the ability to examine education as a pathway through which the cash transfer may have influenced HIV risk. A better understanding of these pathways and how they are affected by the setting may help inform the conditions under which cash transfers may be an effective component of an HIV prevention programme.

Africa
South Africa
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