Articles tagged as "United Republic of Tanzania"

The value of religious leaders in promoting healthy behaviour

Educating religious leaders to promote uptake of male circumcision in Tanzania: a cluster randomised trial.

Downs JA, Mwakisole AH, Chandika AB, Lugoba S, Kassim R, Laizer E, Magambo KA, Lee MH, Kalluvya SE, Downs DJ, Fitzgerald DW. Lancet. 2017 Mar 18;389(10074):1124-1132.doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32055-4. Epub 2017 Feb 15

Background: Male circumcision is being widely deployed as an HIV prevention strategy in countries with high HIV incidence, but its uptake in sub-Saharan Africa has been below targets. We did a study to establish whether educating religious leaders about male circumcision would increase uptake in their village.

Methods: In this cluster randomised trial in northwest Tanzania, eligible villages were paired by proximity (<60 km) and the time that a free male circumcision outreach campaign from the Tanzanian Ministry of Health became available in their village. All villages received the standard male circumcision outreach activities provided by the Ministry of Health. Within the village pairs, villages were randomly assigned by coin toss to receive either additional education for Christian church leaders on scientific, religious, and cultural aspects of male circumcision (intervention group), or standard outreach only (control group). Church leaders or their congregations were not masked to random assignment. The educational intervention consisted of a 1-day seminar co-taught by a Tanzanian pastor and a Tanzanian clinician who worked with the Ministry of Health, and meetings with the study team every 2 weeks thereafter, for the duration of the circumcision campaign. The primary outcome was the proportion of male individuals in a village who were circumcised during the campaign, using an intention-to-treat analysis that included all men in the village. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT 02167776.

Findings: Between June 15, 2014, and Dec 10, 2015, we provided education for church leaders in eight intervention villages and compared the outcomes with those in eight control villages. In the intervention villages, 52.8% (30 889 of 58 536) of men were circumcised compared with 29.5% (25 484 of 86 492) of men in the eight control villages (odds ratio 3.2 [95% CI, 1.4-7.3]; p=0.006).

Interpretation: Education of religious leaders had a substantial effect on uptake of male circumcision, and should be considered as part of male circumcision programmes in other sub-Saharan African countries. This study was conducted in one region in Tanzania; however, we believe that our intervention is generalisable. We equipped church leaders with knowledge and tools, and ultimately each leader established the most culturally-appropriate way to promote male circumcision. Therefore, we think that the process of working through religious leaders can serve as an innovative model to promote healthy behaviour, leading to HIV prevention and other clinically relevant outcomes, in a variety of settings.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Voluntary medical male circumcision is recommended for HIV prevention in settings with high prevalence of HIV. However, uptake of male circumcision has been lower in some settings than is optimal to reduce population-level HIV incidence. Religious beliefs can be an important barrier to acceptance of VMMC. In this community randomised trial, the investigators sought to improve uptake of male circumcision in Tanzania through an education programme delivered to religious leaders alongside a VMMC outreach campaign. Following educational seminars, each religious leader was asked to decide how best to address issues of male circumcision in his or her own community. Overall, there was a three-fold increase in uptake of male circumcision in the programme villages compared with control villages.

Deep commitment to religious faith and practices is common in many sub-Saharan countries. In this study, investigators used an innovative approach to promote healthy behaviour by tapping into the power of religious leaders. The impressive results illustrate the importance of addressing social and structural determinants of behaviour. This is a model that could be extended to address other challenging health behaviours in this and other similar settings. 

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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Providing HIV treatment in Tanzania costs relatively little, but means a large increase in current health spending

The costs of providing antiretroviral therapy services to HIV-infected individuals presenting with advanced HIV disease at public health centres in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: Findings from a randomised trial evaluating different health care strategies.

Kimaro GD, Mfinanga S, Simms V, Kivuyo S, Bottomley C, Hawkins N, Harrison TS, Jaffar S, Guinness L, on behalf of the REMSTART trial team. PLoS One. 2017 Feb 24;12(2):e0171917. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0171917. eCollection 2017.

Background: Understanding the costs associated with health care delivery strategies is essential for planning. There are few data on health service resources used by patients and their associated costs within antiretroviral (ART) programmes in Africa.

Material and methods: The study was nested within a large trial, which evaluated screening for cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculosis and a short initial period of home-based adherence support for patients initiating ART with advanced HIV disease in Tanzania and Zambia. The economic evaluation was done in Tanzania alone. We estimated costs of providing routine ART services from the health service provider's perspective using a micro-costing approach. Incremental costs for the different novel components of service delivery were also estimated. All costs were converted into US dollars (US$) and based on 2012 prices.

Results: Of 870 individuals enrolled in Tanzania, 434 were enrolled in the intervention arm and 436 in the standard care/control arm. Overall, the median (IQR) age and CD4 cell count at enrolment were 38 [31, 44] years and 52 [20, 89] cells/mm3, respectively. The mean per patient costs over the first three months and over a one year period of follow up following ART initiation in the standard care arm were US$ 107 (95%CI 101-112) and US$ 265 (95%CI 254-275) respectively. ART drugs, clinic visits and hospital admission constituted 50%, 19%, and 19% of the total cost per patient year, while diagnostic tests and non-ART drugs (co-trimoxazole) accounted for 10% and 2% of total per patient year costs. The incremental costs of the intervention to the health service over the first three months was US$ 59 (p<0.001; 95%CI 52-67) and over a one year period was US$ 67(p<0.001; 95%CI 50-83). This is equivalent to an increase of 55% (95%CI 51%-59%) in the mean cost of care over the first three months, and 25% (95%CI 20%-30%) increase over one year of follow up.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: There are very few data on the cost of providing HIV treatment in sub-Saharan Africa. The authors of this paper analysed cost data from a trial of screening services for opportunistic infections, to estimate the additional costs of HIV treatment to the health service. The most costly part of treatment was the antiretroviral medicines themselves, followed by clinic visits and hospital admissions. Diagnostic tests and treatments for other conditions were relatively inexpensive. The overall costs of treatment to the health system were fairly low in absolute terms. At around US$67 per year this is on the cheaper side of many cost studies. However, HIV treatment increases overall health system costs by a quarter. This could have significant implications for health system funding requirements in Tanzania as treatment is offered to the many people who need it in the UNAIDS 90-90-90 treatment target.

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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Treatment of depression at antiretroviral initiation could have a considerable impact on mortality

Depression at antiretroviral therapy initiation and clinical outcomes among a cohort of Tanzanian women living with HIV.

Sudfeld CR, Kaaya S, Gunaratna NS, Mugusi F, Fawzi WW, Aboud S, Smith Fawzi. AIDS. 2017 Jan 14;31(2):263-271. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001323.

Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the relationship of depression at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation with mortality and clinical outcomes among Tanzanian women living with HIV.

Design: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1487 women who initiated ART in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Methods: Symptoms of depression and anxiety were assessed using a Tanzanian-adapted and validated version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Participants attended monthly clinic visits during the first 2 years of ART and CD4 T-cell counts were assessed every 4 months. Proportional hazard models were used to assess the relationship of depression with mortality and clinical outcomes.

Results: Symptoms consistent with depression were prevalent among 57.8% of women at ART initiation. After multivariate adjustment, including social support and stigma, depression at ART initiation was associated with increased risk of mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 1.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-3.20; P = 0.01] and incidence of severe anemia (hemoglobin <8.5 g/dl; HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 1.07-2.37; P = 0.02). Under the assumption of causality, we estimate 36.1% (95% CI: 13.6-55.1%) of deaths among the study cohort were attributable to depression and its consequences. Depression was not significantly associated with trajectory of CD4 T-cell reconstitution or the risk of immunologic failure (P values >0.05).

Conclusion: Elimination of depression may reduce mortality during the first 2 years of ART by one-third in our study cohort. Randomized trials and rigorous implementation studies are needed to evaluate the individual and population-level effects of integrated mental health interventions and HIV treatment approaches in resource-limited settings.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: People living with HIV are more than twice as likely to have depression than the general population, in both high- and low-income settings. Many studies in high-income countries have illustrated that depression is associated with poor HIV-associated outcomes. There have been relatively few longitudinal studies on this from low-income settings. This study, among women in Tanzania living with HIV, found that over half had symptoms consistent with depression at ART initiation, and this was associated with a two-fold risk of mortality. The results suggest that effective programmes which address depression, such as problem-solving therapy or cognitive behaviour therapy, at ART initiation, could have a considerable impact on mortality. There is a need to evaluate appropriate mental health programmes integrated with HIV strategies in resource-limited settings that address the specific needs of different populations of people living with HIV, such as children and adolescents   

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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Improving education about HIV transmission among health workers could reduce stigmatizing attitudes

Another generation of stigma? Assessing healthcare student perceptions of HIV-positive patients in Mwanza, Tanzania.

Aggarwal S, Lee DH, Minteer WB, Fenning RT, Raja SK, Bernstein ME, Raman KR, Denny SP, Patel PA, Lieber M, Farfel AO, Diamond CA. AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2017 Feb;31(2):87-95. doi: 10.1089/apc.2016.0175. Epub 2017 Jan 18.

HIV-related stigma remains a persistent global health concern among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWA) in developing nations. The literature is lacking in studies about healthcare students' perceptions of PLWA. This study is the first effort to understand stigmatizing attitudes toward HIV-positive patients by healthcare students in Mwanza, Tanzania, not just those who will be directly treating patients but also those who will be indirectly involved through nonclinical roles, such as handling patient specimens and private health information. A total of 208 students were drawn from Clinical Medicine, Laboratory Sciences, Health Records and Information Management, and Community Health classes at the Tandabui Institute of Health Sciences and Technology for a voluntary survey that assessed stigmatizing beliefs toward PLWA. Students generally obtained high scores on the overall survey instrument, pointing to low stigmatizing beliefs toward PLWA and an overall willingness to treat PLWA with the same standard of care as other patients. However, there are gaps in knowledge that exist among students, such as a comprehensive understanding of all routes of HIV infection. The study also suggests that students who interact with patients as part of their training are less likely to exhibit stigmatizing beliefs toward PLWA. A comprehensive course in HIV infection, one that includes classroom sessions focused on the epidemiology and routes of transmission as well as clinical opportunities to directly interact with PLWA-perhaps through teaching sessions led by PLWA-may allow for significant reductions in stigma toward such patients and improve clinical outcomes for PLWA around the world.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: This paper reports on a survey of students who were undergoing training in Clinical Medicine, Laboratory Sciences, Health Records and Information Management, Nursing, and Community Health in Mwanza, Tanzania. The survey aimed to explore attitudes about people living with HIV. The authors report that their results illustrate low stigmatizing beliefs towards people living with HIV. However, around a quarter believed that HIV is a punishment for bad behaviour. A third believed that people who acquired HIV from drug use or sex deserved to become infected. Further to this, nearly three quarters believed that individuals who were HIV positive could have avoided infection if they wanted to. A quarter believed that people living with HIV have been promiscuous. There were no differences in response by gender but students under 24 were more likely to have negative attitudes. The authors suggest that this could be due to lower education levels than the older students, although they had not measured this. Students studying Clinical Medicine were less likely to have negative attitudes. On a positive note the students reported that they would treat people living with HIV as equal with other people.

The students displayed some lack of knowledge about routes of HIV infection beyond sex and drug use, especially mother-to-child HIV transmission. The authors suggest that better education in this area may reduce the negative attitudes about people living with HIV, reported by many of the students. Overall, this survey reveals some gaps in education, that if addressed could reduce stigma by health workers against people living with HIV.

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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Peer support: not a panacea for poor adherence

Use of peers to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a global network meta-analysis.

Kanters S, Park JJ, Chan K, Ford N, Forrest J, Thorlund K, Nachega JB, Mills EJ. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Nov 30;19(1):21141. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.21141. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: It is unclear whether using peers can improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To construct the World Health Organization's global guidance on adherence interventions, we conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of using peers for achieving adequate adherence and viral suppression.

Methods: We searched for randomized clinical trials of peer-based interventions to promote adherence to ART in HIV populations. We searched six electronic databases from inception to July 2015 and major conference abstracts within the last three years. We examined the outcomes of adherence and viral suppression among trials done worldwide and those specific to low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) using pairwise and network meta-analyses.

Results and discussion: Twenty-two trials met the inclusion criteria. We found similar results between pairwise and network meta-analyses, and between the global and LMIC settings. Peer supporter+Telephone was superior in improving adherence than standard-of-care in both the global network (odds-ratio [OR]=4.79, 95% credible intervals [CrI]: 1.02, 23.57) and the LMIC settings (OR=4.83, 95% CrI: 1.88, 13.55). Peer support alone, however, did not lead to improvement in ART adherence in both settings. For viral suppression, we found no difference of effects among interventions due to limited trials.

Conclusions: Our analysis showed that peer support leads to modest improvement in adherence. These modest effects may be due to the fact that in many settings, particularly in LMICs, programmes already include peer supporters, adherence clubs and family disclosures for treatment support. Rather than introducing new interventions, a focus on improving the quality in the delivery of existing services may be a more practical and effective way to improve adherence to ART.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Sustained adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical to ensure successful treatment outcomes and prevent drug resistance, AIDS-associated illness, death and onward transmission of HIV infection. In recent years, there has been much enthusiasm for use of peer support as a programme to improve adherence. Most high HIV prevalence settings have limited resources. Stigma influences adherence to treatment, and peer-based support may be a practical solution both in terms of being low cost and a mechanism for addressing stigma.

In this systematic review, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of peer-supporter programmes alone or in combination with other activities, namely telephone calls, device reminders or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), globally and in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). The systematic review findings were used to inform the 2015 World Health Organization HIV treatment guidelines.

The study demonstrates that peer support alone did not have any impact on adherence or on viral suppression. It did demonstrate modest improvements on adherence when combined with telephone activities. Several factors need to be considered in interpreting these findings. Firstly, adherence was assessed using a variety of methods including pill counts and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), which may have introduced heterogeneity. Secondly, few trials (particularly in LMICs) used HIV viral load as an outcome and therefore there may not have been adequate statistical power to detect an effect. Thirdly, populations included in the review were heterogeneous e.g. ART-naïve and experienced, people who inject drugs, non-adherent individuals. Notably, only one trial included children and adolescents among whom adherence is typically poorer. 

Importantly, in many settings particularly in LMICs, programmes already include treatment supporters and adherence clubs and therefore additional peer support would likely not add additional impact. The findings of this study suggest that programmes should focus on improving the quality of existing services rather than introduce new programmes. The review also highlights the need to standardise adherence measures and the need for robust research on adherence, particularly among children.         

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Improving ART adherence: what works?

Interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Kanters S, Park JJ, Chan K, Socias ME, Ford N, Forrest JI, Thorlund K, Nachega JB, Mills EJ. Lancet HIV. 2017 Jan;4(1):e31-e40. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30206-5. Epub 2016 Nov 16.

Background: High adherence to antiretroviral therapy is crucial to the success of HIV treatment. We evaluated comparative effectiveness of adherence interventions with the aim of informing the WHO's global guidance on interventions to increase adherence.

Methods: For this systematic review and network meta-analysis, we searched for randomised controlled trials of interventions that aimed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens in populations with HIV. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and MEDLINE for reports published up to July 16, 2015, and searched major conference abstracts from Jan 1, 2013, to July 16, 2015. We extracted data from eligible studies for study characteristics, interventions, patients' characteristics at baseline, and outcomes for the study populations of interest. We used network meta-analyses to compare adherence and viral suppression for all study settings (global network) and for studies in low-income and middle-income countries only (LMIC network).

Findings: We obtained data from 85 trials with 16 271 participants. Short message service (SMS; text message) interventions were superior to standard of care in improving adherence in both the global network (odds ratio [OR] 1.48, 95% credible interval [CrI] 1.00-2.16) and in the LMIC network (1.49, 1.04-2.09). Multiple interventions showed generally superior adherence to single interventions, indicating additive effects. For viral suppression, only cognitive behavioural therapy (1.46, 1.05-2.12) and supporter interventions (1.28, 1.01-1.71) were superior to standard of care in the global network; none of the interventions improved viral response in the LMIC network. For the global network, the time discrepancy (whether the study outcome was measured during or after intervention was withdrawn) was an effect modifier for both adherence to antiretroviral therapy (coefficient estimate -0.43, 95% CrI -0.75 to -0.11) and viral suppression (-0.48; -0.84 to -0.12), suggesting that the effects of interventions wane over time.

Interpretation: Several interventions can improve adherence and viral suppression; generally, their estimated effects were modest and waned over time.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Maintaining adherence to self-administered medications is difficult. On average, people who are prescribed medications for chronic diseases take fewer than half the prescribed doses. Evidence suggests that in most settings adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is better than this, but there will always be people that struggle to maintain the high levels of adherence required for durable virologic suppression. In this analysis, there was some evidence that specific activities or combinations of activities improved virologic suppression. However, the effect sizes were small and when the analysis was confined to studies in low-income and middle-income countries, there was no evidence to suggest an effect on virologic suppression. Overall the evidence to support any particular activity or combination of activities was not compelling.     

Findings from this analysis have been incorporated into most recent consolidated ART guidelines from the World Health Organization. Trying to summarize complex evidence in this way creates many challenges. Trials were conducted in different populations. Some with all people starting ART, others with people considered to have high risk of suboptimal adherence, and others with people who already had adherence problems. The trials also naturally would have differed in content and quality of the usual package of care to support adherence (the comparator for most programme). 60% of the trials were conducted exclusively in the United States, while others were conducted across different settings.

These are just some of the things that make it difficult to synthesize this evidence into guidance that can be applicable to people living with HIV worldwide. HIV programmes in countries have to decide whether or not to adopt any of these activities that are recommended by WHO on the basis of relatively weak evidence. Would we expect activities aimed at improving adherence to be generalizable across different settings? One might argue probably not. Adherence is a multifactorial, dynamic process and there is unlikely to be a ‘one size fits all’ approach to supporting adherence. In the absence of better evidence for any specific activity, we should perhaps focus on improving the quality of the basic package of adherence support offered to all people receiving ART, while also developing better ways to identify when certain people might benefit from enhanced support.        

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Invasive cervical cancers preventable by HPV vaccines: a comparison of HIV-positive and negative women

Effect of HIV infection on human papillomavirus types causing invasive cervical cancer in Africa.

Clifford GM, de Vuyst H, Tenet V, Plummer M, Tully S, Franceschi S. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016 Nov 1;73(3):332-339.

Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type.

Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa.

Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR).

Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV.

Conclusions: HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is one of the most common cancers in low and middle income countries. In the African region the prevalence of both ICC and HIV are high. Compared to HIV-negative women, HIV-positive women are at increased risk of oncogenic high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) incidence and persistence, and cervical lesion incidence and progression. Current HPV vaccines offer potential for cervical cancer prevention by targeting the HR-HPV types associated with ICC. Although there is no data yet available on HPV vaccine efficacy among HIV-positive persons, HPV vaccines have been reported to be safe and immunogenic in HIV-positive children, female adolescents and adults. 

This systematic review compared the HPV type distribution and the HPV vaccine type distribution in ICC biopsy and cervical cell specimens of 770 HIV-positive and 3846 HIV-negative women from 21 studies in 12 African countries.

The authors report that the fraction of ICC attributable to the HPV types included in the current bivalent (HPV16/18) and nonavalent (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was similar among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women (bivalent: 61.7% and 67.3%; nonavalent: 88.9% and 89.5%, respectively). However, a non-negligible proportion of ICC from both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women were infected with non-vaccine types in the absence of any of the vaccine types (7.0% and 7.9% of ICC from HIV-positive and HIV-negative women, respectively), and this was highest for HPV35.

These findings confirm that the currently available HPV vaccines could prevent a similar proportion of ICC cases in HIV-positive as in HIV-negative women. ICC remains an important co-morbidity among HIV-positive women even in the antiretroviral era. Given that HIV-positive women are at greater risk of HR-HPV persistence and cervical lesion incidence and faster progression to high-grade cervical lesions, primary prevention of HPV infection through vaccination could reduce HPV infection and HPV-associated disease in Africa. However, cervical cancer screening will continue to remain important for both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women as there remain a proportion of ICC cases that may not be preventable by currently available vaccines. 

Comorbidity, Epidemiology
Africa
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School-based HIV prevention programmes appear ineffective

School-based interventions for preventing HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy in adolescents.

Mason-Jones AJ, Sinclair D, Mathews C, Kagee A, Hillman A, Lombard C. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Nov 8;11:CD006417.

Background: School-based sexual and reproductive health programmes are widely accepted as an approach to reducing high-risk sexual behaviour among adolescents. Many studies and systematic reviews have concentrated on measuring effects on knowledge or self-reported behaviour rather than biological outcomes, such as pregnancy or prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of school-based sexual and reproductive health programmes on sexually transmitted infections (such as HIV, herpes simplex virus, and syphilis), and pregnancy among adolescents.

Search methods: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for published peer-reviewed journal articles; and ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for prospective trials; AIDS Education and Global Information System (AEGIS) and National Library of Medicine (NLM) gateway for conference presentations; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNAIDS, the WHO and the National Health Service (NHS) centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) websites from 1990 to 7 April 2016. We hand searched the reference lists of all relevant papers.

Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), both individually randomized and cluster-randomized, that evaluated school-based programmes aimed at improving the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents.

Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, evaluated risk of bias, and extracted data. When appropriate, we obtained summary measures of treatment effect through a random-effects meta-analysis and we reported them using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results: We included eight cluster-RCTs that enrolled 55,157 participants. Five trials were conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and Kenya), one in Latin America (Chile), and two in Europe (England and Scotland). Sexual and reproductive health educational programmes. Six trials evaluated school-based educational interventions. In these trials, the educational programmes evaluated had no demonstrable effect on the prevalence of HIV (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.32, three trials; 14 163 participants; low certainty evidence), or other STIs (herpes simplex virus prevalence: RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.15; three trials, 17 445 participants; moderate certainty evidence; syphilis prevalence: RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.39; one trial, 6977 participants; low certainty evidence). There was also no apparent effect on the number of young women who were pregnant at the end of the trial (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.16; three trials, 8280 participants; moderate certainty evidence). Material or monetary incentive-based programmes to promote school attendance. Two trials evaluated incentive-based programmes to promote school attendance. In these two trials, the incentives used had no demonstrable effect on HIV prevalence (RR 1.23, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.96; two trials, 3805 participants; low certainty evidence). Compared to controls, the prevalence of herpes simplex virus infection was lower in young women receiving a monthly cash incentive to stay in school (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.85), but not in young people given free school uniforms (data not pooled, two trials, 7229 participants; very low certainty evidence). One trial evaluated the effects on syphilis and the prevalence was too low to detect or exclude effects confidently (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.05 to 3.27; one trial, 1291 participants; very low certainty evidence). However, the number of young women who were pregnant at the end of the trial was lower among those who received incentives (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.99; two trials, 4200 participants; low certainty evidence). Combined educational and incentive-based programmes. The single trial that evaluated free school uniforms also included a trial arm in which participants received both uniforms and a programme of sexual and reproductive education. In this trial arm herpes simplex virus infection was reduced (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.99; one trial, 5899 participants; low certainty evidence), predominantly in young women, but no effect was detected for HIV or pregnancy (low certainty evidence).

Authors' conclusions: There is a continued need to provide health services to adolescents that include contraceptive choices and condoms and that involve them in the design of services. Schools may be a good place in which to provide these services. There is little evidence that educational curriculum-based programmes alone are effective in improving sexual and reproductive health outcomes for adolescents. Incentive-based interventions that focus on keeping young people in secondary school may reduce adolescent pregnancy but further trials are needed to confirm this.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: School-based HIV prevention programmes are widespread worldwide. These programmes use educational institutions as a venue to reach a population that is entering sexual maturity. Several systematic reviews have found beneficial effects of these programmes on HIV-associated knowledge and behaviours, though a subsequent effect of reduced HIV incidence remains unconfirmed. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, the authors included eight randomized controlled trials from sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Whether using a curriculum- or incentive-based programme, the trials did not provide evidence of an effect of school-based programmes on reducing HIV infection. Nor was there compelling evidence of an effect of these programmes on reducing sexually transmitted infection or pregnancy. This paper highlights the difficulty of translating knowledge and reported behaviors into reductions in HIV infection and other biological outcomes. Further thought is necessary to deliver effective sexual and reproductive health programmes in schools – possibly including incentives, which show some promise but need further evidence on effectiveness. 

Africa, Europe, Latin America
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‘I wish I could have a life like others’: mental health challenges for young people living with HIV in Tanzania

A qualitative exploration of the mental health and psychosocial contexts of HIV-positive adolescents in Tanzania.

Ramaiya MK, Sullivan KA, K OD, Cunningham CK, Shayo AM, Mmbaga BT, Dow DE. PLoS One. 2016 Nov 16;11(11):e0165936. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165936. eCollection 2016.

Although 85% of HIV-positive adolescents reside in sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the psychosocial and mental health factors affecting their daily well-being. Identifying these contextual variables is key to development of culturally appropriate and effective interventions for this understudied and high-risk population. The purpose of this study was to identify salient psychosocial and mental health challenges confronted by HIV-positive youth in a resource-poor Tanzanian setting. A total of 24 qualitative interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of adolescents aged 12-24 receiving outpatient HIV care at a medical center in Moshi, Tanzania. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using thematic analysis. Psychosocial challenges identified included loss of one or more parents, chronic domestic abuse, financial stressors restricting access to medical care and education, and high levels of internalized and community stigma among peers and other social contacts. Over half of youth (56%) reported difficulties coming to terms with their HIV diagnosis and espoused related feelings of self-blame. These findings highlight the urgent need to develop culturally proficient programs aimed at helping adolescents cope with these manifold challenges. Results from this study guided the development of Sauti ya Vijana (The Voice of Youth), a 10-session group mental health intervention designed to address the psychosocial and mental health needs of HIV-positive Tanzanian youth.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: This article presents the findings of a mixed-methods study with young people living with HIV and accessing care in Moshi, Tanzania. The study was conducted as part of a larger study assessing mental health needs in this population. The article reports on themes from individual qualitative interviews with 24 young people (aged 13-23) who had mental health difficulties that were previously assessed with the scales used in the larger project. Young people reported a wide range of psychosocial issues leading to ongoing mental health challenges.  These were challenges for which they had received little or no psychological support. Issues included internalized, feared and experienced HIV stigma, loss and bereavement from being orphaned.  Additional challenges were stress from poverty and insecurity in the household, isolation and difficulties with disclosure of their HIV status, and direct and vicarious experiences of violence and abuse. Young people also discussed finding strength in spirituality, friendships and especially peer-support from other young people living with HIV. Findings from the overall study are being used to inform the development of a mental health activity model that, if effective, could be scaled up in other low-income settings. 

Africa
United Republic of Tanzania
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Moving from facility to community-based models of HIV care - will it work?

Community-based interventions to improve and sustain antiretroviral therapy adherence, retention in HIV care and clinical outcomes in low- and middle-income countries for achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets.

Nachega JB, Adetokunboh O, Uthman OA, Knowlton AW, Altice FL, Schechter M, Galarraga O, Geng E, Peltzer K, Chang LW, Van Cutsem G, Jaffar SS, Ford N, Mellins CA, Remien RH, Mills EJ. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2016 Oct;13(5):241-55. doi: 10.1007/s11904-016-0325-9.

Little is known about the effect of community versus health facility-based interventions to improve and sustain antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, virologic suppression, and retention in care among HIV-infected individuals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We systematically searched four electronic databases for all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative cohort studies in LMICs comparing community versus health facility-based interventions. Relative risks (RRs) for pre-defined adherence, treatment engagement (linkage and retention in care), and relevant clinical outcomes were pooled using random effect models. Eleven cohort studies and eleven RCTs (N = 97 657) were included. Meta-analysis of the included RCTs comparing community- versus health facility-based interventions found comparable outcomes in terms of ART adherence (RR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.99 to 1.04), virologic suppression (RR = 1.00, 95 % CI 0.98 to 1.03), and all-cause mortality (RR = 0.93, 95 % CI 0.73 to 1.18). The result of pooled analysis from the RCTs (RR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01 to 1.06) and cohort studies (RR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03 to 1.15) found that participants assigned to community-based interventions had statistically significantly higher rates of treatment engagement. Two studies found community-based ART delivery model either cost-saving or cost-effective. Community- versus facility-based models of ART delivery resulted in at least comparable outcomes for clinically stable HIV-infected patients on treatment in LMICs and are likely to be cost-effective.

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Editor’s notes: The remarkable global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes, while much-needed and impressive, has had inevitable consequences. These include overcrowding of health facilities, longer waiting times, reduced time for counselling and care of newly-enrolled people and restricted capacity to provide support for people who do not remain engaged with care. Furthermore, the UNAIDS 90-90-90 treatment target for 2020 to have 90% of people living with HIV know their HIV status, 90% of all diagnosed individuals receiving ART and 90% of people living with HIV on ART to be virally suppressed, will now require an additional 20 million people living with HIV to start treatment.

Community-based programmes to complement facility-based model of HIV care delivery are increasingly being recognised as an important and sustainable approach to address the growing numbers of people accessing care in high-HIV prevalence settings. This review compared outcomes of community-based versus facility-based models of ART delivery and treatment support. There was no statistical difference in optimal ART adherence, virologic suppression or all-cause mortality between participants assigned to community-based ART and facility-based ART in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). When data from RCTs and cohort studies were pooled, participants assigned to community-based ART appeared to have higher rates of retention in care at the end of the follow-up period. Notably, the few studies that did examine cost-effectiveness found community-based programmes to be cost-saving.

The findings demonstrate that community-level programmes are certainly not inferior to facility-based programmes. However, it is important to note some key limitations. Firstly, many of the studies are subject to selection bias, i.e. people at risk of poorer outcomes e.g. sicker people or people with a history of poor adherence may be excluded from receiving community-based programmes. The authors also highlight a high risk of “other forms of bias” in the cohort studies, but these are not specified. Secondly, adherence measures based on self-report may not be reliable. Thirdly, the review compared a heterogeneous set of programmes. Fourthly, as with other systematic reviews, publication bias is highly likely.   

Notwithstanding these limitations, this study suggests that community-based programmes have promise in supporting fragile and overcrowded facility-based healthcare systems in providing HIV care to a growing number of people. There may even be potential for integrating HIV care with care for other chronic conditions.

Well-designed studies are necessary, given the ambitious targets we have set ourselves, to explore the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community-based programmes. This is particularly important in under-represented groups with disproportionately poor outcomes such as children, adolescents and pregnant women. Further, for community-based programmes to be effective, it will be critical to ensure that adequate training and mentorship and ongoing monitoring for quality assurance is in place.      

Africa, Asia, Latin America
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