Articles tagged as "United States of America"

No evidence that antiretroviral therapy increases risk taking behaviour

Effects of HIV antiretroviral therapy on sexual and injecting risk-taking behaviour: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Doyle JS, Degenhardt L, Pedrana AE, McBryde ES, Guy R, Stoove MA, Weaver E, Grulich AE, Lo YR, Hellard ME. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 4. pii: ciu602. [Epub ahead of print]

Background:  Increased global access and use of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been postulated to undermine HIV prevention efforts by changing individual risk-taking behaviour. This review aims to determine whether ART use is associated with changes in sexual or injecting risk-taking behaviour or diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted of HIV-seropositive participants receiving ART compared to no ART use in experimental or observational studies. Primary outcomes included: (1) any unprotected sexual intercourse; (2) STI diagnoses; and (3) any unsafe injecting behaviour.

Results: Fifty-eight studies met the selection criteria. Fifty-six studies containing 32 857 participants reported unprotected sex; eleven studies containing 16 138 participants reported STI diagnoses; and four studies containing 1 600 participants reported unsafe injecting behaviour. All included studies were observational. Unprotected sex was lower in those receiving ART than those not receiving ART (odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95%CI 0.64-0.83, p<0.001; heterogeneity I2=79%) in both high-income (n=38) and low-/middle-income country (n=18) settings, without any evidence of publication bias. STI diagnoses were also lower among individuals on ART (OR 0.58, 95%CI 0.33-1.01, p=0.053; I2=92%), however there was no difference in injecting risk-taking behaviour with antiretroviral use (OR 0.90, 95%CI 0.60-1.35, p=0.6; I2=0%).

Conclusions: Despite concerns that use of ART might increase sexual or injecting risk-taking, available research suggests unprotected sex is reduced among HIV-infected individuals on treatment. The reasons for this are not yet clear, though self-selection and mutually reinforcing effects of HIV treatment and prevention messages among people on ART are likely.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may modify risk perception, leading to increases in risk-taking behaviour and HIV transmission. This has important implications for HIV prevention. In particular in low and middle-income countries, where the global burden of HIV is greatest and where access to, and use of, ART is rapidly increasing. This systematic review identified observational studies comparing risk-taking behaviour in people living with HIV using ART, compared with people not using ART. The review found that ART does not appear to increase reported unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, newly diagnosed sexually transmitted infections, or unsafe injecting behaviour among people on treatment. The observation that reductions in unprotected sex are associated with ART use should be interpreted cautiously as limited data are available to accurately assess a causal relationship. The current practice of providing ART with counselling, education and ongoing clinical care probably offers the optimal strategy of ensuring that individuals on ART minimise risks associated with unsafe sex. 

Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America, Oceania
  • share
0 comments.

Treatment of HIV-2, where is the evidence?

Antiretroviral therapy response among HIV-2 infected patients: a systematic review.

Ekouevi DK, Tchounga BK, Coffie PA, Tegbe J, Anderson AM, Gottlieb GS, Vitoria M, Dabis F, Eholie SP. BMC Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 26;14:461. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-14-461.

Methods: Data were extracted from articles that were selected after screening of PubMed/MEDLINE up to November 2012 and abstracts of the 1996-2012 international conferences. Observational cohorts, clinical trials and program reports were eligible as long as they reported data on ART response (clinical, immunological or virological) among HIV-2 infected patients. The determinants investigated included patients' demographic characteristics, CD4 cell count at baseline and ART received.

Results: Seventeen reports (involving 976 HIV-2 only and 454 HIV1&2 dually reactive patients) were included in the final review, and the analysis presented in this report are related to HIV-2 infected patients only in 17 reports. There was no randomized controlled trial and only two cohorts had enrolled more than 100 HIV-2 only infected patients. The median CD4 count at ART initiation was 165 cells /mm3, [IQR; 137-201] and the median age at ART initiation was 44 years (IQR: 42-48 years). Ten studies included 103 patients treated with three nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). Protease inhibitor (PI) based regimens were reported by 16 studies. Before 2009, the most frequent PIs used were Nelfinavir and Indinavir, whereas it was Lopinavir/ritonavir thereafter. The immunological response at month-12 was reported in six studies and the mean CD4 cell count increase was +118 cells /µL (min-max: 45-200 cells/µL).

Conclusion: Overall clinical and immuno-virologic outcomes in HIV-2 infected individuals treated with ART are suboptimal. There is a need of randomized controlled trials to improve the management and outcomes of people living with HIV-2 infection.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: HIV-2 accounts for between 10-20% of HIV infections in West Africa. With a longer asymptomatic period, lower plasma viral load and slower decline in CD4 count, it is often seen as a less aggressive virus than HIV-1. However, people with HIV-2 still experience clinical progression and AIDS-related deaths. WHO recommends initiating a boosted protease inhibitor regimen or a triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI)-based regimen in people living with HIV-2 when their CD4 count falls below 500 cells/mm3. However, as clearly demonstrated in this systematic review, the evidence underlying when to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the optimal treatment options for people living with HIV-2, is weak. Only 17 observational studies (15 cohort studies and two case series) were identified. Overall immune recovery was sub-optimal and, given the small sample sizes of these studies, there was limited power to detect any differences in outcomes by treatment regimen. Further evidence is urgently needed to guide optimal treatment of people living with HIV-2. 

Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America
  • share
0 comments.

Cotrimoxazole appears safe in pregnant women living with HIV, despite poor quality evidence

Safety of cotrimoxazole in pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ford N, Shubber Z, Jao J, Abrams EJ, Frigati L, Mofenson L. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2014 Aug 15;66(5):512-21. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000211.

Introduction: Cotrimoxazole is widely prescribed to treat a range of infections, and for HIV-infected individuals it is administered as prophylaxis to protect against opportunistic infections. Some reports suggest that fetuses exposed to cotrimoxazole during early pregnancy may have an increased risk of congenital anomalies. We carried out this systematic review to update the evidence of cotrimoxazole safety in pregnancy.

Methods: Three databases and 1 conference abstract site were searched in duplicate up to October 31, 2013, for studies reporting adverse maternal and infant outcomes among women receiving cotrimoxazole during pregnancy. This search was updated in MEDLINE via PubMed to April 28, 2014. Studies were included irrespective of HIV infection status or the presence of other coinfections. Our primary outcome was birth defects of any kind. Secondary outcomes included spontaneous abortions, terminations of pregnancy, stillbirths, preterm deliveries, and drug-associated toxicity.

Results: Twenty-four studies were included for review. There were 232 infants with congenital anomalies among 4 196 women receiving cotrimoxazole during pregnancy, giving an overall pooled prevalence of 3.5% (95% confidence interval: 1.8% to 5.1%; τ² = 0.03). Three studies reported 31 infants with neural tube defects associated with first trimester exposure to cotrimoxazole, giving a crude prevalence of 0.7% (95% confidence interval: 0.5% to 1.0%) with most data (29 neural tube defects) coming from a single study. The majority of adverse drug reactions were mild. The quality of the evidence was very low.

Conclusions: The findings of this review support continued recommendations for cotrimoxazole as a priority intervention for HIV-infected pregnant women. It is critical to improve data collection on maternal and infant outcomes.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Cotrimoxazole significantly reduces morbidity and increases survival in people living with HIV (including people on antiretroviral therapy) in resource-limited settings.  However, there is some concern of potential human foetal risk when cotrimoxazole is taken during pregnancy. This systematic review found very limited evaluable data on maternal and infant outcomes associated with cotrimoxazole exposure during pregnancy. Cotrimoxazole is likely to be of most benefit in high HIV burden, low-income settings. In this context, the known benefit of treatment outweighs the potential risk to the foetus, in HIV-positive pregnant women.  Importantly, this paper highlights the need for better pregnancy outcome surveillance in women living with HIV, in resource-poor settings, which includes evaluation of exposure to cotrimoxazole and antiretroviral treatment.  

Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America, Oceania
  • share
0 comments.

Hunger hinders antiretroviral therapy adherence

Does food insecurity undermine adherence to antiretroviral therapy? A systematic review.

Singer AW, Weiser SD, McCoy SI. AIDS Behav. 2014 Aug 6. [Epub ahead of print]

A growing body of research has identified food insecurity as a barrier to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. We systematically reviewed and summarized the quantitative literature on food insecurity or food assistance and ART adherence. We identified nineteen analyses from eighteen distinct studies examining food insecurity and ART adherence. Of the thirteen studies that presented an adjusted effect estimate for the relationship between food insecurity and ART adherence, nine found a statistically significant association between food insecurity and sub-optimal ART adherence. Four studies examined the association between food assistance and ART adherence, and three found that ART adherence was significantly better among food assistance recipients than non-recipients. Across diverse populations, food insecurity is an important barrier to ART adherence, and food assistance appears to be a promising intervention strategy to improve ART adherence among persons living with HIV. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of food assistance in improving ART adherence and other clinical outcomes among people living with HIV in the era of widespread and long-term treatment.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: A number of qualitative studies have found that a lack of food is given as a reason for non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART). The authors wanted to see if quantitative studies on food security and adherence supported this view. As with many systematic reviews the number of quantitative studies included in the final analysis was small: fourteen. However, the majority of these studies did find an association between the availability of food and adherence. The authors very carefully describe the difference methods used to measure both food security and ART adherence.  These findings show both the wide range of methods used for measurement and definitions of adherence and food security, which made comparisons difficult. So, while the authors did find that food insecurity is a barrier to adherence, they could not say why. Given that food insecurity may be a threat to adherence for the some of the increasing numbers of people starting ART, further research is urgently needed. We need to understand more about the association between food and ART adherence. 

  • share
0 comments.

Do brief programmes for people who take drugs work?

Brief intervention for problem drug use in safety-net primary care settings: a randomized clinical trial.

Roy-Byrne P, Bumgardner K, Krupski A, Dunn C, Ries R, Donovan D, West, II, Maynard C, Atkins DC, Graves MC, Joesch JM, Zarkin GA. JAMA. 2014 Aug 6;312(5):492-501. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.7860.

Importance: Although brief intervention is effective for reducing problem alcohol use, few data exist on its effectiveness for reducing problem drug use, a common issue in disadvantaged populations seeking care in safety-net medical settings (hospitals and community health clinics serving low-income patients with limited or no insurance).

Objective: To determine whether brief intervention improves drug use outcomes compared with enhanced care as usual.

Design, setting, and participants: A randomized clinical trial with blinded assessments at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months conducted in 7 safety-net primary care clinics in Washington State. Of 1 621 eligible patients reporting any problem drug use in the past 90 days, 868 consented and were randomized between April 2009 and September 2012. Follow-up participation was more than 87% at all points.

Interventions: Participants received a single brief intervention using motivational interviewing, a handout and list of substance abuse resources, and an attempted 10-minute telephone booster within 2 weeks (n = 435) or enhanced care as usual, which included a handout and list of substance abuse resources (n = 433).

Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcomes were self-reported days of problem drug use in the past 30 days and Addiction Severity Index-Lite (ASI) Drug Use composite score. Secondary outcomes were admission to substance abuse treatment; ASI composite scores for medical, psychiatric, social, and legal domains; emergency department and inpatient hospital admissions, arrests, mortality, and human immunodeficiency virus risk behavior.

Results: Mean days used of the most common problem drug at baseline were 14.40 (SD, 11.29) (brief intervention) and 13.25 (SD, 10.69) (enhanced care as usual); at 3 months postintervention, means were 11.87 (SD, 12.13) (brief intervention) and 9.84 (SD, 10.64) (enhanced care as usual) and not significantly different (difference in differences, beta = 0.89 [95% CI, -0.49 to 2.26]). Mean ASI Drug Use composite score at baseline was 0.11 (SD, 0.10) (brief intervention) and 0.11 (SD, 0.10) (enhanced care as usual) and at 3 months was 0.10 (SD, 0.09) (brief intervention) and 0.09 (SD, 0.09) (enhanced care as usual) and not significantly different (difference in differences, beta = 0.008 [95% CI, -0.006 to 0.021]). During the 12 months following intervention, no significant treatment differences were found for either variable. No significant differences were found for secondary outcomes.

Conclusions and relevance: A one-time brief intervention with attempted telephone booster had no effect on drug use in patients seen in safety-net primary care settings. This finding suggests a need for caution in promoting widespread adoption of this intervention for drug use in primary care.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: As well as injecting drug use, in some settings, people with problematic use of drugs are at increased risk of HIV. There has been a growing use of brief programmes to reduce drug use and drug-related harm. This is despite a gap in evidence about whether such short activities work or not. This paper presents the findings from a large randomised controlled trial. The trial examined the effectiveness of brief programmes for reducing drug use and increase admission to specialist substance abuse services, compared to an enhanced care package. The study was relatively large (n=868) with high follow-up rate (more than 87%). A range of drugs and severity of use were reported. No differences were found between the brief programme and control in relation to frequency of drug use, or medical, psychiatric, employment, family/social or legal outcomes. This finding is not surprising considering the complex problems that often accompany problematic drug use, including high levels of co-morbid mental illness. What is surprising, is that the increased uptake of specialist care and reduced use of emergency departments was significantly associated with the most severe drug use. This suggests that, for these outcomes, the programme may have had a greater effect on people who were more severe drug users. It would have been helpful if the study reported prevalence of injecting among the sample, since injecting is usually associated with more frequent drug use and drug-related harms than non-injecting. Knowing whether injecting contributed to increased severity of drug use among this sample might have helped interpret the association between the brief programme and reduced use of emergency departments among people who were severe users. This paper rightly urges caution in rolling out brief programmes for a broad spectrum of drug use in primary care settings and suggests the need for more research to examine the effectiveness of brief activities by type, mode and severity of drug use.  

Health care delivery
Northern America
United States of America
  • share
0 comments.

Falling death rates among people in HIV care: AIDS remains common, non-AIDS cancers need attention

Trends in underlying causes of death in people with HIV from 1999 to 2011 (D:A:D): a multicohort collaboration.

Smith CJ, Ryom L, Weber R, Morlat P, Pradier C, Reiss P, Kowalska JD, de Wit S, Law M, el Sadr W, Kirk O, Friis-Moller N, Monforte A, Phillips AN, Sabin CA, Lundgren JD, D:A:D Study Group. Lancet. 2014 Jul 19;384(9939):241-8. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60604-8.

Background: With the advent of effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy for people with HIV is now approaching that seen in the general population. Consequently, the relative importance of other traditionally non-AIDS-related morbidities has increased. We investigated trends over time in all-cause mortality and for specific causes of death in people with HIV from 1999 to 2011.

Methods: Individuals from the Data collection on Adverse events of anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study were followed up from March, 1999, until death, loss to follow-up, or Feb 1, 2011, whichever occurred first. The D:A:D study is a collaboration of 11 cohort studies following HIV-1-positive individuals receiving care at 212 clinics in Europe, USA, and Australia. All fatal events were centrally validated at the D:A:D coordinating centre using coding causes of death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. We calculated relative rates using Poisson regression.

Findings: 3 909 of the 49 731 D:A:D study participants died during the 308 719 person-years of follow-up (crude incidence mortality rate, 12.7 per 1 000 person-years [95% CI 12.3-13.1]). Leading underlying causes were: AIDS-related (1 123 [29%] deaths), non-AIDS-defining cancers (590 [15%] deaths), liver disease (515 [13%] deaths), and cardiovascular disease (436 [11%] deaths). Rates of all-cause death per 1 000 person-years decreased from 17.5 in 1999-2000 to 9.1 in 2009-11; we saw similar decreases in death rates per 1 000 person-years over the same period for AIDS-related deaths (5.9 to 2.0), deaths from liver disease (2.7 to 0.9), and cardiovascular disease deaths (1.8 to 0.9). However, non-AIDS cancers increased slightly from 1.6 per 1 000 person-years in 1999-2000 to 2.1 in 2009-11 (p=0.58). After adjustment for factors that changed over time, including CD4 cell count, we detected no decreases in AIDS-related death rates (relative rate for 2009-11 vs 1999-2000: 0.92 [0.70-1.22]). However, all-cause (0.72 [0.61-0.83]), liver disease (0.48 [0.32-0.74]), and cardiovascular disease (0.33 [0.20-0.53) death rates still decreased over time. The percentage of all deaths that were AIDS-related (87/256 [34%] in 1999-2000 and 141/627 [22%] in 2009-11) and liver-related (40/256 [16%] in 1999-2000 and 64/627 [10%] in 2009-11) decreased over time, whereas non-AIDS cancers increased (24/256 [9%] in 1999-2000 to 142/627 [23%] in 2009-11).

Interpretation: Recent reductions in rates of AIDS-related deaths are linked with continued improvement in CD4 cell count. We hypothesise that the substantially reduced rates of liver disease and cardiovascular disease deaths over time could be explained by improved use of non-HIV-specific preventive interventions. Non-AIDS cancer is now the leading non-AIDS cause and without any evidence of improvement.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Causes of death among people with HIV help to identify priorities for HIV care services. This very large cohort study, including nearly 50 000 HIV-positive people in industrialised country clinics, reports on changes in causes of death since 1999. Effective antiretroviral treatment was widely available for this cohort. All-cause mortality decreased over time, partly explained by effective antiretroviral therapy and increased CD4 cell counts. Death rates due to AIDS declined over time. However, even in 2009-11, AIDS remained a leading cause of death, suggesting that further efforts to diagnose and treat people with HIV earlier are required.

Deaths due to cardiovascular and liver-related causes decreased over time, even after adjustment for other potentially contributing factors. This suggests that people in this cohort were benefitting not only from good management of their HIV disease, but also from other preventive programmes for cardiovascular and other risk factors. By contrast, death rates due to non-AIDS-related cancers have not fallen, suggesting that more attention to prevention and early detection of common malignancies is needed.

Comorbidity, Epidemiology
  • share
0 comments.

Per-act HIV transmission risk during anal sex may be higher than previously thought

Estimating per-act HIV transmission risk: a systematic review.

Patel P, Borkowf CB, Brooks JT, Lasry A, Lansky A, Mermin J. AIDS. 2014 Jun 19;28(10):1509-19. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000298.

Background: Effective HIV prevention programs rely on accurate estimates of the per-act risk of HIV acquisition from sexual and parenteral exposures. We updated the previous risk estimates of HIV acquisition from parenteral, vertical, and sexual exposures, and assessed the modifying effects of factors including condom use, male circumcision, and antiretroviral therapy.

Methods: We conducted literature searches to identify new studies reporting data regarding per-act HIV transmission risk and modifying factors. Of the 7 339 abstracts potentially related to per-act HIV transmission risk, three meta-analyses provided pooled per-act transmission risk probabilities and two studies provided data on modifying factors. Of the 8 119 abstracts related to modifying factors, 15 relevant articles, including three meta-analyses, were included. We used fixed-effects inverse-variance models on the logarithmic scale to obtain updated estimates of certain transmission risks using data from primary studies, and employed Poisson regression to calculate relative risks with exact 95% confidence intervals for certain modifying factors.

Results: Risk of HIV transmission was greatest for blood transfusion, followed by vertical exposure, sexual exposures, and other parenteral exposures. Sexual exposure risks ranged from low for oral sex to 138 infections per 10 000 exposures for receptive anal intercourse. Estimated risks of HIV acquisition from sexual exposure were attenuated by 99.2% with the dual use of condoms and antiretroviral treatment of the HIV-infected partner.

Conclusion: The risk of HIV acquisition varied widely, and the estimates for receptive anal intercourse increased compared with previous estimates. The risk associated with sexual intercourse was reduced most substantially by the combined use of condoms and antiretroviral treatment of HIV-infected partners.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The study updates the 2005 Centres for Disease Control (CDC) per-act HIV transmission risks with estimates from recent publications. In addition, it summarizes the effects of various co-factors that modify the transmission risks during sexual exposure. These include genital ulcer disease, viral load, disease stage, use of antiretrovirals, condom use and male circumcision. However, estimates from low-income countries on sexual and mother-to-child transmission are very heterogeneous and not included in the analyses. In general, the updated estimates of transmission risks are comparable to figures from the 2005 CDC study. But they also suggest that the transmission probabilities for both receptive and insertive anal intercourse could be higher than previously thought. Further, the study reasserts that the per-act risk for all sexual exposures is substantially attenuated through the use of condoms and antiretrovirals. These new estimates will be important for both modelling studies and prevention programmes. But a better understanding of HIV transmission risks in low-income countries is needed. 

Asia, Northern America, Oceania
  • share
0 comments.

Identifying people most likely to benefit from HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis

HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis in men who have sex with men and transgender women: a secondary analysis of a phase 3 randomised controlled efficacy trial.

Buchbinder SP, Glidden DV, Liu AY, McMahan V, Guanira JV, Mayer KH, Goicochea P, Grant RM. Lancet Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;14(6):468-75. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(14)70025-8. Epub 2014 Mar 7.

Background: For maximum effect pre-exposure prophylaxis should be targeted to the subpopulations that account for the largest proportion of infections (population-attributable fraction [PAF]) and for whom the number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent infection is lowest. We aimed to estimate the PAF and NNT of participants in the iPrEx (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Initiative) trial.

Methods: The iPrEx study was a randomised controlled efficacy trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis with coformulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine in 2 499 men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women. Participants aged 18 years or older who were male at birth were enrolled from 11 trial sites in Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and the USA. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either a pill with active pre-exposure prophylaxis or placebo, taken daily. We calculated the association between demographic and risk behaviour during screening and subsequent seroconversion among placebo recipients using a Poisson model, and we calculated the PAF and NNT for risk behaviour subgroups..

Findings: Patients were enrolled between July 10, 2007, and Dec 17, 2009, and were followed up until Nov 21, 2010. Of the 2 499 MSM and transgender women in the iPrEx trial, 1 251 were assigned to pre-exposure prophylaxis and 1 248 to placebo. 83 of 1 248 patients in the placebo group became infected with HIV during follow-up. Participants reporting receptive anal intercourse without a condom seroconverted significantly more often than those reporting no anal sex without a condom (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 5.11, 95% CI 1.55-16.79). The overall PAF for MSM and transgender women reporting receptive anal intercourse without a condom was 64% (prevalence 60%). Most of this risk came from receptive anal intercourse without a condom with partners with unknown serostatus (PAF 53%, prevalence 54%, AHR 4.76, 95% CI 1.44-15.71); by contrast, the PAF for receptive anal intercourse without a condom with an HIV-positive partner was 1% (prevalence 1%, AHR 7.11, 95% CI 0.70-72.75). The overall NNT per year for the cohort was 62 (95% CI 44-147). NNTs were lowest for MSM and transgender women self-reporting receptive anal intercourse without a condom (NNT 36), cocaine use (12), or a sexually transmitted infection (41). Having one partner and insertive anal sex without a condom had the highest NNTs (100 and 77, respectively).

Interpretation: Pre-exposure prophylaxis may be most effective at a population level if targeted toward MSM and transgender women who report receptive anal intercourse without a condom, even if they perceive their partners to be HIV negative. Substance use history and testing for STIs should also inform individual decisions to start pre-exposure prophylaxis. Consideration of the PAF and NNT can aid in discussion of the benefits and risks of pre-exposure prophylaxis with MSM and transgender women.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP) is the only biomedical prevention activity shown to be effective against acquisition of HIV in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women, in a randomised controlled trial. The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and WHO recommend PreP for MSM and transgender women at high risk of HIV infection. However, many health care providers have difficulty assessing risk and neither the CDC nor WHO has yet provided specific behavioural criteria for when to use pre-exposure prophylaxis. The purpose of this study was to identify subpopulations of participants within the iPrEx trial, for whom PreP may have the largest effect on HIV prevention. The findings suggest that MSM and transgender women can be screened for potential eligibility for PreP in clinical practice by asking about recent receptive anal intercourse without a condom. Substance use history and testing for sexually transmitted infections should also be considered, to inform individual decisions to start pre-exposure prophylaxis.

  • share
0 comments.

HIV-related tweeting: social media for HIV prevention?

Methods of using real-time social media technologies for detection and remote monitoring of HIV outcomes.

Young SD, Rivers C, Lewis B. Prev Med. 2014 Jun;63:112-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.024. Epub 2014 Feb 8.

Objective: Recent availability of "big data" might be used to study whether and how sexual risk behaviors are communicated on real-time social networking sites and how data might inform HIV prevention and detection. This study seeks to establish methods of using real-time social networking data for HIV prevention by assessing 1) whether geolocated conversations about HIV risk behaviors can be extracted from social networking data, 2) the prevalence and content of these conversations, and 3) the feasibility of using HIV risk-related real-time social media conversations as a method to detect HIV outcomes.

Methods: In 2012, tweets (N=553 186 061) were collected online and filtered to include those with HIV risk-related keywords (e.g., sexual behaviors and drug use). Data were merged with AIDSVU data on HIV cases. Negative binomial regressions assessed the relationship between HIV risk tweeting and prevalence by county, controlling for socioeconomic status measures.

Results: Over 9 800 geolocated tweets were extracted and used to create a map displaying the geographical location of HIV-related tweets. There was a significant positive relationship (p<.01) between HIV-related tweets and HIV cases.

Conclusion: Results suggest the feasibility of using social networking data as a method for evaluating and detecting Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors and outcomes.

 Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The concept of Big Data refers to data sets so large that they are almost or actually impossible to analyse or manage. Methods for harnessing big data sets, such as from social network sites online, are being developed for a variety of uses. These include understanding consumers for the purposes of building creative product marketing campaigns to predicting outbreaks of influenza. This paper examined the potential for using big data from Twitter to compare with areas of high HIV prevalence in the United States, to predict areas of increasing new HIV infections. There are several limitations for the method used in this paper. However, the idea presents an interesting concept. This study was conducted in a developed country, and while computers may not be readily available in resource limited settings, mobile phones are in use in most populations around the world. With mobile technology becoming increasingly sophisticated, and online social networking becoming more common, even in resource limited settings, this may be a strategy worth considering. It could be used in high HIV incidence networks within countries with high rates of HIV, especially in generalised epidemics. Clearly, this method will require additional research, validation and time to develop, but it could present a novel approach for estimating incidence without expensive testing. 

Epidemiology
Northern America
United States of America
  • share
0 comments.

Improved delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy with integrated HIV and TB services

Interventions to improve delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy: an overview of systematic reviews

Adams LV, Talbot EA, Odato K, Blunt H, Steingart KR. BMC Infect Dis. 2014 May 21;14(1):281. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-14-281.

Background: Uptake of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to prevent tuberculosis has been poor, particularly in the highest risk populations. Interventions to improve IPT delivery could promote implementation. The large number of existing systematic reviews on treatment adherence has made drawing conclusions a challenge. To provide decision makers with the evidence they need, we performed an overview of systematic reviews to compare different organizational interventions to improve IPT delivery as measured by treatment completion among those at highest risk for the development of TB disease, namely child contacts or HIV-infected individuals.

Methods: We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), and MEDLINE up to August 15, 2012. Two authors used a standardized data extraction form and the AMSTAR instrument to independently assess each review.

Results: Six reviews met inclusion criteria. Interventions included changes in the setting/site of IPT delivery, use of quality monitoring mechanisms (e.g., directly observed therapy), IPT delivery integration into other healthcare services, and use of lay health workers. Most reviews reported a combination of outcomes related to IPT adherence and treatment completion rate but without a baseline or comparison rate. Generally, we found limited evidence to demonstrate that the studied interventions improved treatment completion.

Conclusions: While most of the interventions were not shown to improve IPT completion, integration of tuberculosis and HIV services yielded high treatment completion rates in some settings. The lack of data from high burden TB settings limits applicability. Further research to assess different IPT delivery interventions, including those that address barriers to care in at-risk populations, is urgently needed to identify the most effective practices for IPT delivery and TB control in high TB burden settings.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is a key component of the “3 Is” strategy to reduce tuberculosis among people living with HIV. Despite evidence of efficacy, initiation of IPT among eligible people in HIV care programmes has been disappointing. When IPT has been delivered as a stand-alone activity, treatment completion has often been poor. This overview of systematic reviews brings together evidence concerning organisational programmes to improve IPT delivery, using treatment completion as the main outcome. Three of the six included reviews, specifically included HIV-positive people.

When IPT delivery was integrated into other services, such as HIV care, good IPT completion rates were reported. A common weakness in the studies reviewed, was the lack of a suitable comparison group. This made it difficult to be sure that the good outcomes were due to the service integration. HIV This Month reported in June 2014 a trial from South Africa, showing that IPT reduces TB incidence among people taking antiretroviral therapy. Viewed together, these studies provide additional evidence supporting IPT delivery as part of the package of care for people in HIV care. More research is needed to guide implementers on how to deliver TB preventive therapy most effectively for people living with HIV.

Avoid TB deaths
Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America
  • share
0 comments.