Articles tagged as "Africa"

We still lack good data on many specific populations that are most severely affected by HIV

Editor’s notes: Transgender women are often under-represented in HIV research.  Yet they face many challenges in day to day life with discrimination at many levels.  Employment opportunities are few and many transgender women make a living through sex work.  It is well recognized that they are at specific and increased risks of HIV. Yet many intervention trials group them with gay men and other men who have sex with men, often meaning that the results cannot be disaggregated into more meaningful categories.  The number of transgender women in particular studies is also often too small to make strong conclusions from the data they provide to the study.  So it is encouraging to see Grinsztejn and colleagues establishing a major study specifically in the community of transgender women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  The authors recruited 345 transgender women through a respondent driven sampling process.  This non-random approach is necessitated by the nature of the population, as it would not be possible to make a complete sampling frame from census or other documentation.  However, statistical approaches to make best estimates of population measures are available and the authors found that almost one third of the women were living with HIV and that 29% had not previously been tested for HIV.  The high frequency of other sexually transmitted infections highlights the need for better engagement and services not just for HIV but for their wider sexual and reproductive health and rights needs.

Another population that is under-researched is people with disabilities.  “There is a tribe of Ugandans . . . whose issues and needs have not been given their due and appropriate attention in the fight. By all indications, persons with disabilities have been forgotten, consciously and unconsciously. They represent the forgotten tribe” (Mwesigwa Martin Babu, 2005). Abimanyi-Ochom and colleagues used data collected during the 2011 Ugandan demographic and health survey, which included questions about disabilities for the first time.  While HIV knowledge is similar in those with and without disabilities, people living with disabilities reported indicators of increased risk of acquiring HIV.  Findings included slightly earlier sexual debut and a higher frequency of reported sexually transmitted infections.  Other studies have demonstrated that people living with disabilities may have lower self-esteem and self-efficacy and that abuse, including sexual abuse is more common among this group than among their peers.

The findings are reinforced by a study from Cameroon.  De Beaudrap and colleagues used the same questionnaire that had been used in the Uganda DHS (the Washington short set of questions on disability) to identify people living with disability in a random sample of the population in Yaounde.  The prevalence of HIV was almost twice as high among those with disability than among controls matched by age, sex and residential area.  In line with the discussion in the Ugandan paper, the authors in Cameroon found that women with disability were more likely to receive money for sex and to be victims of sexual violence.  Both of these characteristics were, not surprisingly, associated with still higher rates of HIV infection.  Both papers call for more and better data and we also need to develop and test interventions to reduce the burden of HIV among those living with disabilities.

Unveiling of HIV dynamics among transgender women: a respondent-driven sampling study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Grinsztejn B, Jalil EM, Monteiro L, Velasque L, Moreira RI, Garcia AC, Castro CV, Krüger A, Luz PM, Liu AY, McFarland W, Buchbinder S, Veloso VG, Wilson EC; Transcender Study Team. Lancet HIV. 2017 Apr;4(4):e169-e176. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(17)30015-2. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

Background: The burden of HIV in transgender women (transwomen) in Brazil remains unknown. We aimed to estimate HIV prevalence among transwomen in Rio de Janeiro and to identify predictors of newly diagnosed HIV infections.

Methods: We recruited transwomen from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, by respondent-driven sampling. Eligibility criteria were self-identification as transwomen, being 18 years of age or older, living in Rio de Janeiro or its metropolitan area, and having a valid peer recruitment coupon. We recruited 12 seed participants from social movements and formative focus groups who then used peer recruitment coupons to refer subsequent peers to the study. We categorised participants as HIV negative, known HIV infected, or newly diagnosed as HIV infected. We assessed predictors of newly diagnosed HIV infections by comparing newly diagnosed with HIV-negative participants. We derived population estimates with the Respondent-Driven Sampling II estimator.

Findings: Between Aug 1, 2015, and Jan 29, 2016, we enrolled 345 eligible transwomen. 29·1% (95% CI 23·2-35·4) of participants had no previous HIV testing (adjusted from 60 participants), 31·2% (18·8-43·6) had HIV infections (adjusted from 141 participants), and 7·0% (0·0-15·9) were newly diagnosed as HIV infected (adjusted from 40 participants). We diagnosed syphilis in 28·9% (18·0-39·8) of participants, rectal chlamydia in 14·6% (5·4-23·8), and gonorrhoea in 13·5% (3·2-23·8). Newly diagnosed HIV infections were associated with black race (odds ratio 22·8 [95% CI 2·9-178·9]; p=0·003), travesti (34·1 [5·8-200·2]; p=0·0001) or transsexual woman (41·3 [6·3-271·2]; p=0·0001) gender identity, history of sex work (30·7 [3·5-267·3]; p=0·002), and history of sniffing cocaine (4·4 [1·4-14·1]; p=0·01).

Interpretation: Our results suggest that transwomen bear the largest burden of HIV among any population at risk in Brazil. The high proportion of HIV diagnosis among young participants points to the need for tailored long-term health-care and prevention services to curb the HIV epidemic and improve the quality of life of transwomen in Brazil.

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HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of persons with and without disabilities from the Uganda demographic and health survey 2011: differential access to HIV/AIDS information and services.

Abimanyi-Ochom J, Mannan H, Groce NE, McVeigh J  PLoS One. 2017 Apr 13;12(4):e0174877. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174877. eCollection 2017.

Uganda is among the first to use the Washington Group Short Set of Questions on Disability to identify persons with disabilities in its Demographic and Health Survey. In this paper, we review the HIV knowledge, attitudes and behaviour component of the 2011 Ugandan demographic and health survey, analysing a series of questions comparing those with and without disabilities in relation to HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and practices. We found comparable levels of knowledge on HIV/AIDS for those with and those without disabilities in relation to HIV transmission during delivery (93.89%, 93.26%) and through breastfeeding (89.91%, 90.63%), which may reflect increased attention to reaching the community of persons with disabilities. However, several gaps in the knowledge base of persons with disabilities stood out, including misconceptions of risk of HIV infection through mosquito bites and caring for a relative with HIV in own household (34.39%, 29.86%; p<0.001; 91.53%, 89.00%; p = 0.001, respectively). The issue is not just access to appropriate information but also equitable access to HIV/AIDS services and support. Here we found that persons with multiple disabilities were less likely than individuals without disabilities to return to receive results from their most recent HIV test (0.60[0.41-0.87], p<0.05). HIV testing means little if people do not return for follow-up to know their HIV status and, if necessary, to be connected to available services and supports. Additional findings of note were that persons with disabilities reported having a first sexual encounter at a slightly younger age than peers without disabilities; and persons with disabilities also reported having a sexually transmitted disease (STD) within the last 12 months at significantly higher rates than peers without disabilities (1.38[1.18-1.63], p<0.01), despite reporting comparable knowledge of the need for safer sex practices. This analysis is among the first to use HIV/AIDS-related questions from Demographic Health Surveys to provide information about persons with disabilities in Uganda in comparison to those without disabilities. These findings present a more complex and nuanced understanding of persons with disabilities and HIV/AIDS. If persons with disabilities are becoming sexually active earlier, are more likely to have an STD within the preceding 12 month period and are less likely to receive HIV test results, it is important to understand why. Recommendations are also made for the inclusion of disability measures in Uganda's AIDS Indicator Survey to provide cyclical and systematic data on disability and HIV/AIDS, including HIV prevalence amongst persons with disabilities.

Abstract Full-text [free] access 

Prevalence of HIV infection among people with disabilities: a population-based observational study in Yaoundé, Cameroon (HandiVIH).

De Beaudrap P, Beninguisse G, Pasquier E, Tchoumkeu A, Touko A, Essomba F, Brus A, Aderemi TJ, Hanass-Hancock J, Eide AH, Mac-Seing M, Mont D. Lancet HIV. 2017 Apr;4(4):e161-e168. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30209-0. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

Background: In resource-limited settings, people with disabilities have been left behind in the response to HIV. In the HandiVIH study, we estimate and compare HIV prevalence and associated risk factors between people with and without disabilities.

Methods: In this cross-sectional, population-based, observational study, we used two-phase random sampling to recruit adults with disabilities and a control group matched for age, sex, and residential location from households of the general population. We used the Washington Group Short Set of Questions on Disability to identify people with disabilities. We administered an HIV test and a life-course history interview to participants. The primary outcome was the prevalence of HIV among participants with and without disabilities.

Findings: Between Oct 2, 2014, and Nov 30, 2015, we recruited 807 people with disabilities and 807 participants without disabilities from Yaoundé, Cameroon. 28 of 716 people in the control population had a positive HIV test result (crude prevalence 3·9%, 95% CI 2·9-5·3) compared with 50 of 739 people with disabilities (6·8%, 5·0-8·6; conditional odds ratio [OR] 1·7; p=0·04). Women with disabilities were more often involved in paid sexual relationships than were women without disabilities (2·5% vs 0·5%, p=0·05). People with disabilities were also at increased risk of sexual violence than were women without disabilities (11·0% vs 7·5%, OR 1·5; p=0·01). Sexual violence and sex work were strongly associated with increased risk of HIV infection among participants with disabilities but not among controls (OR 3·0, 95% CI 1·6-5·6 for sexual violence and 12·3, 4·4-34·6 for sex work). Analyses were done in men and women.

Interpretation: The higher prevalence of HIV infection in people with disabilities than people without disabilities reflects a higher exposure to HIV infection as well as the presence of disability-associated HIV infection. The susceptibility of people with disabilities to HIV infection seems to be shaped by social and environmental factors. Research is needed to inform firm recommendations on how to protect this vulnerable population.

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Africa, Latin America
Brazil, Cameroon, Uganda
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Short and sweet? Do study participants prefer shorter or longer consent forms? Do they understand the contents?

Editor’s notes: As described above in the HOLA en Grupos study, engagement and partnership is vital if HIV research is to produce useful and relevant results.  The ethics of research involving human subjects continues to evolve but the key principles laid out by Beauchamp and Childress in 1989 remain central.  The principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice, have been extremely influential in the field of medical ethics, and are fundamental for understanding the current approach to ethical assessment in health care.

Autonomy implies that research participants should be able to consent willingly to join a research study and a key part of that informed consent process is usually a written “consent form” that is signed by the participant.  However, a major challenge is often to ensure that on the one hand all relevant information about possible benefits and harms is included in the information and on the other hand that the consent process is manageable and appropriate for the participant.

In the largest study of its kind to date, Grady and colleagues embedded a randomized trial within the larger randomized START trial (comparing immediate with deferred start of antiretroviral medicines in people with early HIV infection).  Around 4000 participants in START were allocated according to their 154 research sites, which were randomly assigned to the original, lengthy and somewhat complicated consent form, or to a simplified, shorter consent form with much more attention paid to ease of comprehension and readability.  The shorter form was still around 1800 words long (compared to the almost 6000 of the original) and was only a little easier to read, because the sponsors of the study needed to be certain that all the information demanded by current guidelines was included.

Surprisingly, there was no overall difference in either the primary outcome (an understanding that participants’ treatment would be randomly allocated) or in overall comprehension of aspects of the study.  In other words, the authors did NOT find the advantages that they were expecting from the modified consent form.

However, various clear trends emerge from the data that are relevant to future research too.  Those with less education were clearly less able to understand the randomization approach.  73% of the 1240 participants who had not attended high school compared to more than 90% of the 935 who had completed a university degree or postgraduate education answered the primary question on randomization correctly. The START study team were diligent in explaining the study to potential participants before presenting the informed consent form, with around a half of participants reporting more than an hour of explanation prior to being asked for consent, and more than 80% of sites reporting that participants understood the study “very well” prior to the consent process.  There was also a clear trend for participants from sites that had been involved in previous HIV research to understand the process better (rising from 69% in those with no previous HIV studies to 85% in those with more than 10).

Increasingly HIV prevention researchers are aiming to work with populations that have high ongoing incidence of HIV.  In a world where treatment is increasingly widespread and overall numbers of infections have fallen somewhat, this means that researchers will tend to be working with more and more disadvantaged populations where many participants may be less well educated and less familiar with research.  This important study makes it clear that the ethical principle of autonomy requires an ongoing process that goes far beyond the choice of words in a consent form.  Research must build trust between researchers and participants.  The research team should explain carefully and in appropriate ways what is involved in the study and what options participants have. Study teams should build a governance process into the research so that participants can have confidence that any risks of the research, both for them as individuals, but also often for the community or group to which they belong, are monitored and mitigated.  In this way potentially vulnerable individuals may still be recruited into important research projects and contribute to the ways in which science can end the epidemic.

A randomized trial comparing concise and standard consent forms in the START trial.

Grady C, Touloumi G, Walker AS, Smolskis M, Sharma S, Babiker AG, Pantazis N, Tavel J, Florence E, Sanchez A, Hudson F, Papadopoulos A, Emanuel E, Clewett M, Munroe D, Denning E; INSIGHT START Informed Consent substudy Group PLoS One. 2017 Apr 26;12(4):e0172607. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172607. eCollection 2017.

Background: Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of research informed consent is a high priority. Some express concern about longer, more complex, written consent forms creating barriers to participant understanding. A recent meta-analysis concluded that randomized comparisons were needed.

Methods: We conducted a cluster-randomized non-inferiority comparison of a standard versus concise consent form within a multinational trial studying the timing of starting antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ adults (START). Interested sites were randomized to standard or concise consent forms for all individuals signing START consent. Participants completed a survey measuring comprehension of study information and satisfaction with the consent process. Site personnel reported usual site consent practices. The primary outcome was comprehension of the purpose of randomization (pre-specified 7.5% non-inferiority margin).

Results: 77 sites (2429 participants) were randomly allocated to use standard consent and 77 sites (2000 participants) concise consent, for an evaluable cohort of 4229. Site and participant characteristics were similar for the two groups. The concise consent was non-inferior to the standard consent on comprehension of randomization (80.2% versus 82%, site adjusted difference: 0.75% (95% CI -3.8%, +5.2%)); and the two groups did not differ significantly on total comprehension score, satisfaction, or voluntariness (p>0.1). Certain independent factors, such as education, influenced comprehension and satisfaction but not differences between consent groups.

Conclusions: An easier to read, more concise consent form neither hindered nor improved comprehension of study information nor satisfaction with the consent process among a large number of participants. This supports continued efforts to make consent forms more efficient.

Trial registration: Informed consent substudy was registered as part of START study in clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00867048, and EudraCT # 2008-006439-12.

Abstract Full-text [free] access 

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HIV self-tests– these women loved them!

Editor’s notes: Encouraging HIV testing, particularly among hard to reach populations such as men, young people and people who do not regularly attend health services is one of the key challenges for the HIV response.  Many countries have adopted the UNAIDS treatment target of 90:90:90, the goal of which is that 90% of all people living with HIV should know their status. WHO has recently released new guidance on the use of HIV self-tests as a screening test and on approaches to partner notification to encourage greater uptake of HIV testing. An interesting qualitative study by Maman S and colleagues explored in depth the attitudes and experiences of 18 female sex workers drawn from a larger ongoing study of HIV self-test approaches.  These women described to the researchers how they had distributed up to five oral fluid based self-test kits to their partners, friends and clients.  The results demonstrate the wide range of potential ways that such distribution might help not only with accessing HIV testing but also increasing dialogue about risk reduction.  Two of the women did experience verbal or sexual abuse, but it is important to realize that women were selected from the larger parent study precisely because they had reported such abuse, in order to understand the context better.  The women remained enthusiastic about distributing self-tests and felt that the benefits outweighed the risks in the challenging environment in which they work.  Nonetheless, as the authors point out, the potential considerable benefits of scaling up HIV self-testing approaches need to be combined with ensuring that there is good communication about the risks, efforts to increase the agency of vulnerable women and support services for women experiencing intimate partner violence whether related to HIV testing or not.

A qualitative study of secondary distribution of HIV self-test kits by female sex workers in Kenya.

Maman S, Murray KR, Napierala Mavedzenge S, Oluoch L, Sijenje F, Agot K, Thirumurthy H. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 27;12(3):e0174629. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174629.eCollection 2017.

Promoting awareness of serostatus and frequent HIV testing is especially important among high risk populations such as female sex workers (FSW) and their sexual partners. HIV self-testing is an approach that is gaining ground in sub-Saharan Africa as a strategy to increase knowledge of HIV status and promote safer sexual decisions. However, little is known about self-test distribution strategies that are optimal for increasing testing access among hard-to-reach and high risk individuals. We conducted a qualitative study with 18 FSW who participated in a larger study that provided them with five oral fluid-based self-tests, training on how to use the tests, and encouragement to offer the self-tests to their sexual partners using their discretion. Women demonstrated agency in the strategies they used to introduce self-tests to their partners and to avoid conflict with partners. They carefully considered with whom to share self-tests, often assessing the possibility for negative reactions from partners as part of their decision making process. When women faced negative reactions from partners, they drew on strategies they had used before to avoid conflict and physical harm from partners, such as not responding to angry partners and forgoing payment to leave angry partners quickly. Some women also used self-tests to make more informed sexual decisions with their partners.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Africa
Kenya
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Non-communicable diseases and co-morbidities – the flip side of successful ART programmes?

Editor’s notes: As the population of people living with HIV grows older and lives longer, the importance of non-communicable diseases is increasing.  Several studies this month explored various aspects of this intersection.

An encouraging study from Spain by Sorigué M et al., analysed the outcomes of patients with advanced stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a relatively common cancer both among people living with HIV and the HIV-negative population. The authors showed that, in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy, the complete response rate and ten year survival were not significantly different among people living with HIV (89% and 73%) and HIV negative people (91% and 68%).

Another broadly encouraging study from Ireland by Tinago W et al., followed up 384 people (176 living with HIV) to determine changes over three years in their bone mineral density (BMD).  BMD was somewhat lower in the people living with HIV, despite the group being younger on average.  As expected, BMD gradually fell with increasing age but the rate of bone loss was no different between people living with HIV and HIV negative people.  88% of the people living with HIV were on ART at the start of the study period.  Not having started ART among people living with HIV was associated with lower BMD and people who had started more recently showed the largest declines in BMD.  This suggests (as has previously been shown in cohorts of people living with HIV) that after an initial loss in BMD, the rate of loss stabilizes and is similar to HIV-negative people.  Interestingly, the authors did not show that overall exposure to tenofovir disproxil fumarate (TDF) was particularly associated with greater BMD loss over the course of follow up, despite several previous randomized trials confirming that TDF does cause BMD loss when it is started.

While on the subject of TDF, this month saw two important regulatory trials of tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), sponsored by the manufacturers Gilead Sciences.  630 people living with HIV on treatment with rilpivirine, emtricitabine and TDF whose viral load was supressed, were randomly allocated to remain on the same regimen or to swap the TDF for TAF.  TAF is a pro-drug, that reduces the plasma concentrations of tenofovir and is therefore expected to reduce the renal and bone toxicities associated with TDF while still delivering active drug to the cells where it is needed.  One year later, viral suppression was very similar in the two groups (94%).  There was also no significant difference seen in the side effects over this one year period, with no serious adverse events and 6% vs. 12% having some side effects in the TAF and TDF arms respectively [Orkin C and colleagues].

A related study by DeJesus E et al. with the same design was conducted among people taking efavirenz, emtricitabine and tenofovir, one of the most common first line regimens throughout the world. In this trial the efavirenz was switched to rilpivirine and the TDF to TAF.  875 people living with HIV whose viral load was supressed were randomized and after one year viral suppression was very similar in the two groups (90-92%).  There was also no significant difference seen in the side effects over this one year period, with no serious adverse events and 13% vs. 10% having some side effects in the rilpivirine -TAF and efavirenz-TDF arms respectively.

Returning to co-morbidities and non-communicable diseases, a study by Rodríguez-Arbolí E and colleagues in rural Tanzania has shown that 11.6% of people living with HIV who had not yet started ART had raised blood pressure.  A further 9.6% develop raised blood pressure during follow up, an incidence of 12 per 100 person years. The risk factors for developing hypertension were those well recognized in HIV-negative populations (age, renal disease and being overweight) and not specifically related to HIV infection, ART or immunological status.  The authors recommend integration of non-communicable disease screening and management into HIV care clinics but a larger conclusion might be to improve management of hypertension more generally, as it affects both people living with HIV and people without.

In contrast, a study by Pollack TM et al. from Viet Nam shows that smoking tobacco is associated with a higher viral load among people living with HIV presenting for ART.  As would be expected, other predictors of more advanced HIV disease such as lower CD4 counts and lower BMI and prior TB were all associated with a higher viral load at presentation.  Male sex was also significantly associated with a higher viral load.  The authors point out various other studies from Cameroon and the US that have shown similar and related interactions between smoking tobacco, viral load at presentation or viral load suppression or rebound on ART treatment.  Other studies in the US have not found this association.  One of the challenges is to separate behavioural factors that might be confounders – perhaps people who smoke are more likely to present late.  In this study there was not a clear dose response.  People who smoked more than ten cigarettes per day were actually somewhat less likely in this sample to have a higher viral load than people who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day, but the numbers were too small to make statistically significant claims.  The authors suggest that oxidative stress and induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway could explain the mechanism of smoking-related increased VL among HIV positive individuals.  While the study cannot prove cause and effect, there are already many reasons to promote tobacco cessation among people living with HIV and this may be an additional one.

The D:A:D study is a major prospective cohort that follows more than 49 000 people living with HIV in Europe, Australia and the USA.  Among the cohort, more than 4000 have developed chronic renal impairment.  A study by Ryom L et al. this month examined whether there was improvement, stabilisation or progression of renal impairment in the 2006 individuals who had additional measurements 2-3 years after renal impairment was first noted and explored risk factors for each.  On the one hand, they show that some ARVs (notably TDF and ritonavir-boosted atazanovir) are associated with worse renal outcomes, but on the other hand, they demonstrate that after stopping these nephrotoxic medicines, the kidneys recover or at least do not deteriorate further.  Once again, traditional risk factors (older age, high blood pressure and diabetes) are also important risk factors for the kidneys of people living with HIV.  As the population of people living with HIV gets older and lives longer, HIV care and traditional non-communicable disease management must overlap and coordinate.

HIV-infection has no prognostic impact on advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma treated with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine.

Sorigué M, García O, Tapia G, Baptista MJ, Moreno M, Mate JL, Sancho JM, FeliuE, Ribera JM, Navarro JT. AIDS. 2017 Mar 29. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001487. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a non-AIDS-defining cancer with good response to chemotherapy in the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era. The aim of the study was to compare the characteristics, the response with treatment and survival of advanced-stage cHL treated with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) between cART-treated HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.

Design and methods: We retrospectively analyzed advanced-stage cHL patients from a single institution, uniformly treated with ABVD. All HIV-positive patients received cART concomitantly with ABVD.

Results: A total of 69 patients were included in the study: 21 were HIV-positive and 48 were HIV-negative. HIV-positive patients had more aggressive features at cHL diagnosis, such as worse performance status, more frequent bone marrow involvement and mixed cellularity histologic subtype. There were no differences in complete response rate (89% in HIV-positive vs. 91% in HIV-negative), P = 1; disease-free survival 10-year disease-free survival 70% (41-99%) vs. 74% (57-91%), P = 0.907 and overall survival (OS) 10-year OS 73% (95% confidence interval52-94%) vs. 68% (51-85%), P = 0.904. On multivariate analysis, HIV infection did not correlate with worse OS.

Conclusion: Although HIV-positive patients with cHL had more aggressive baseline features in this series, there were no differences in response rate or survival between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.

Abstract access 

Predictors of longitudinal change in bone mineral density in a cohort of HIV-positive and negative patients.

Tinago W, Cotter AG, Sabin CA, Macken A, Kavanagh E, Brady JJ, McCarthy G,Compston J, Mallon PW; HIV UPBEAT Study Group.225. AIDS. 2017 Mar 13;31(5):643-652. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001372.

Objective: Although low bone mineral density (BMD) is prevalent in HIV, changes in BMD over time remain unclear. We aimed to compare rates of, and factors associated with, BMD change between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.

Methods: In a prospective, 3-year cohort, HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients provided annual demographic and clinical data, fasting bloods, and dual x-ray absorptiometry. Using longitudinal mixed models we compared and determined predictors of rate of change in BMD.

Results: Of 384 study participants (45.8% HIV positive), 120 contributed two and 264 contributed three BMD measurements. Those with HIV were younger [median interquartile range 39 (34-46) vs. 43 (35-50) years; P = 0.04], more often men (61 vs. 46%; P = 0.003), and less likely Caucasian (61 vs. 82%; P < 0.001).Although BMD was lower in those with HIV, BMD declined in both groups, with nonsignificant between-group difference in rate of BMD change over time. Within the HIV group, starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 3 months of enrolment was associated with greater BMD decline at all anatomical sites (all P < 0.001). Age more than 30 years, Caucasian ethnicity, and not being on ART during follow-up were associated with greater decline and higher parathyroid hormone associated with a smaller decline in BMD at the femoral neck. We found no association between BMD change and exposure to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or protease inhibitors.

Conclusion: We observed no difference in rate of BMD decline regardless of HIV status and in HIV-positive patient, having started ART within the previous 3 months was the only factor associated with greater BMD decline at all three sites.

Abstract access 

Switching from tenofovir disoproxil fumarate to tenofovir alafenamide coformulated with rilpivirine and emtricitabine in virally suppressed adults with HIV-1 infection: a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, phase 3b, non-inferiority study.

Orkin C,  DeJesus E, Ramgopal M, Crofoot G, Ruane P, LaMarca A, Mills A, Vandercam B, de Wet J, Rockstroh J, Lazzarin A, Rijnders B, Podzamczer D, Thalme A, Stoeckle M, Porter D, Liu HC, Cheng A, Quirk E, SenGupta D, Cao H. Lancet HIV. 2017 Mar 1. pii: S2352-3018(17)30031-0. doi:10.1016/S2352-3018(17)30031-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Tenofovir alafenamide, a tenofovir prodrug, results in 90% lower tenofovir plasma concentrations than does tenofovir disproxil fumarate, thereby minimising bone and renal risks. We investigated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of switching to a single-tablet regimen containing rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide compared with remaining on rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

Methods: In this randomised, double-blind, multicentre, placebo-controlled, non-inferiority trial, HIV-1-infected adults were screened and enrolled at 119 hospitals in 11 countries in North America and Europe. Participants were virally suppressed (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per ml) on rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for at least 6 months before enrolment and had creatinine clearance of at least 50 ml/min. Participants were randomly assigned(1:1) to receive a single-tablet regimen of either rilpivirine (25 mg), emtricitabine (200 mg), and tenofovir alafenamide (25 mg) or to remain on a single-tablet regimen of rilpivirine (25 mg), emtricitabine (200 mg), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg), with matching placebo, once daily for 96 weeks. Investigators, participants, study staff, and those assessing outcomes were masked to treatment group. All participants who received one dose of study drug and were on the tenofovir disoproxil fumarate regimen before screening were included in primary efficacy analyses. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with less than 50 copies per ml of plasma HIV-1 RNA at week 48 (by the US Food and Drug Administration snapshot algorithm), with a prespecified non-inferiority margin of 8%. This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT01815736.

Findings: Between Jan 26, 2015, and Aug 25, 2015, 630 participants were randomised (316 to the tenofovir alafenamide group and 314 to the tenofovir disoproxil fumarate group). At week 48, 296 (94%) of 316 participants on tenofovir alafenamide and 294 (94%) of 313 on tenofovir disoproxil fumarate had maintained less than 50 copies per ml HIV-1 RNA (difference -0·3%, 95·001% CI-4·2 to 3·7), showing non-inferiority of tenofovir alafenamide to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Numbers of adverse events were similar between groups. 20(6%) of 316 participants had study-drug related adverse events in the tenofovir alafenamide group compared with 37 (12%) of 314 in the tenofovir disoproxil fumarate group; none of these were serious.

Interpretation: Switching to rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide was non-inferior to continuing rilpivirine, emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in maintaining viral suppression and was well tolerated at 48 weeks. These findings support guidelines recommending tenofovir alafenamide-based regimens, including coformulation with rilpivirine and emtricitabine, as initial and ongoing treatment for HIV-1 infection.

Abstract access 

Switching from efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate to tenofovir alafenamide coformulated with rilpivirine and emtricitabine in virally suppressed adults with HIV-1 infection: a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, phase 3b, non-inferiority study.

DeJesus E, Ramgopal M, Crofoot G, Ruane P, LaMarca A, Mills A, Martorell CT, de Wet J, Stellbrink HJ, Molina JM, Post FA, Valero IP, Porter D, Liu Y, Cheng A, Quirk E, SenGupta D, Cao H. Lancet HIV. 2017 Mar 1. pii: S2352-3018(17)30032-2. doi:10.1016/S2352-3018(17)30032-2. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Tenofovir alafenamide is a prodrug that reduces tenofovir plasma concentrations by 90% compared with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, thereby decreasing bone and renal risks. The coformulation of rilpivirine, emtricitabine,and tenofovir alafenamide has recently been approved, and we aimed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of switching to this regimen compared with remaining on coformulated efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

Methods: In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, non-inferiority trial, HIV-1-infected adults were enrolled at 120 hospitals and outpatient clinics in eight countries in North America and Europe. Participants were virally suppressed (HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per mL) on efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for at least 6 months before enrolment and had creatinine clearance of at least 50 mL/min. Participants were randomly assigned(1:1) to receive a single-tablet regimen of rilpivirine (25 mg), emtricitabine(200 mg), and tenofovir alafenamide (25 mg) or to continue a single-tablet regimen of efavirenz (600 mg), emtricitabine (200 mg), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg), with matching placebo. Investigators, participants, study staff, and those assessing outcomes were masked to treatment group. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with plasma HIV-1 RNA of less than 50copies per mL at week 48 (assessed by the US Food and Drug Administration snapshot algorithm), with a prespecified non-inferiority margin of 8%. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02345226.

Findings: Between Jan 26, 2015, and Aug 27, 2015, 875 participants were randomly assigned and treated (438 with rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide and 437 with efavirenz, emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate). Viral suppression at week 48 was maintained in 394 (90%) of 438 participants assigned to the tenofovir alafenamide regimen and 402 (92%) of 437 assigned to the tenofovir disoproxil fumarate regimen (difference -2·0%, 95·001% CI -5·9 to 1·8), demonstrating non-inferiority. 56 (13%) of 438 in participants in the rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide group experienced treatment-related adverse events compared with 45 (10%) of 437 in the efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate group.

Interpretation: Switching to rilpivirine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide from efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate was non-inferior in maintaining viral suppression and was well tolerated at 48 weeks. These findings support guidelines recommending tenofovir alafenamide-based regimens, including coformulation with rilpivirine and emtricitabine, as initial and ongoing treatment for HIV-1 infection.

Abstract access 

Incidence and risk factors for hypertension among HIV patients in rural Tanzania - A prospective cohort study.

Rodríguez-Arbolí E, Mwamelo K, Kalinjuma AV, Furrer H, Hatz C, Tanner M, Battegay M, Letang E; KIULARCO Study Group. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 8;12(3):e0172089. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172089.eCollection 2017.

Introduction: Scarce data are available on the epidemiology of hypertension among HIV patients in rural sub-Saharan Africa. We explored the prevalence, incidence and risk factors for incident hypertension among patients who were enrolled in a rural HIV cohort in Tanzania.

Methods: Prospective longitudinal study including HIV patients enrolled in the Kilombero and Ulanga Antiretroviral Cohort between 2013 and 2015. Non-ART naïve subjects at baseline and pregnant women during follow-up were excluded from the analysis. Incident hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg on two consecutive visits. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of baseline characteristics and incident hypertension.

Results: Among 955 ART-naïve, eligible subjects, 111 (11.6%) were hypertensive at recruitment. Ten women were excluded due to pregnancy. The remaining 834 individuals contributed 7967 person-months to follow-up (median 231 days, IQR 119-421) and 80 (9.6%) of them developed hypertension during a median follow-up of 144 days from time of enrolment into the cohort [incidence rate 120.0 cases/1000 person-years, 95% confidence interval (CI) 97.2-150.0]. ART was started in 630 (75.5%) patients, with a median follow-up on ART of 7 months (IQR 4-14). Cox regression models identified age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.34 per 10 years increase, 95% CI 1.07-1.68, p = 0.010], body mass index (aHR per 5 kg/m2 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.99, p = 0.018) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (aHR < 60 versus ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 3.79, 95% CI 1.60-8.99, p = 0.003) as independent risk factors for hypertension development.

Conclusions: The prevalence and incidence of hypertension were high in our cohort. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors predicted incident hypertension, but no association was observed with immunological or ART status. These data support the implementation of routine hypertension screening and integrated management into HIV programmes in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

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Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

Pollack TM, Duong HT, Pham TT, Do CD, Colby D. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 7;12(3):e0173534. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173534.eCollection 2017.

High HIV viral load (VL >100 000 cp/ml) is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100 000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15-3.45), while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75-2.66). Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100 000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of tobacco use among HIV-infected patients.

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Predictors of eGFR progression, stabilisation or improvement after chronic renal impairment in HIV-positive individuals.

Ryom L, Mocroft A, Kirk O, Reiss P, Ross M, Smith C, Moranne O, Morlat P, Fux CA, Sabin C, Phillips A, Law M, Lundgren JD; D:A:D study group. AIDS. 2017 Mar 28. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001464. [Epub ahead of print]

Objectives: The objectives of this analysis were to investigate predictors of progression, stabilisation or improvement in eGFR after development of chronic renal impairment (CRI) in HIV-positive individuals.

Design: Prospective observational study.

Methods: D:A:D study participants progressing to CRI defined as confirmed, ≥ 3 months apart, eGFR ≤70  mL/min/1.73m were included in the analysis. The median of all eGFRs measured 24-36 months post-CRI was compared to the median eGFR defining CRI, and changes were grouped into: improvement (>+10 mL/min/1.73m), stabilisation (-10 to +10 mL/min/1.73m) and progression (<-10 mL/min/1.73m). Adjusted polynomial regression models assessed odds of better eGFR outcomes after CRI, assuming eGFR improvement is better than stabilisation which in turn is better than progression.

Results: Of 2006 individuals developing CRI, 21% subsequently improved eGFR, 67% stabilised and 12% progressed. Individuals remaining on TDF or boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) 24 months post-CRI had worse eGFR outcomes compared to those unexposed (TDF: 0.47 [0.35-0.63], ATV/r: 0.63 [0.48-0.82]). Individuals off TDF for 12-24 months (0.75 [0.50-1.13]) or off ATV/r for >12 months (1.17 [0.87-1.57]) had similar eGFR outcomes as those unexposed to these ARVs. Older age, hypertension, later date of CRI and diabetes were associated with worse eGFR outcomes.

Conclusion: Current TDF and ATV/r use after a diagnosis of CRI was associated with worse eGFR outcomes. In contrast, TDF and ATV/r discontinuation lead to similar longer-term eGFR outcomes as in those unexposed suggesting these drug-associated eGFR declines may be halted or reversed after their cessation.

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Comorbidity, HIV Treatment
Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America, Oceania
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Stigma and sex work

Editor’s notes: Two interesting studies this month looked at aspects of stigma.  There are big methodological challenges to the study of stigma.  Stigma comprises several different domains and few studies use standardized approaches to measurement that can be translated easily into other contexts.  A systematic review and meta-analysis concludes that people who feel more stigmatized are twice as likely to delay presenting for HIV care.  Gesesew HA and colleagues found only ten studies that met their pre-specified inclusion criteria, and five of these came from Ethiopia.  They acknowledge many of the challenges in combining the results of these ten studies into a single conclusion.  They recommend engagement of health care workers to try to reduce perceived stigma among people living with HIV.

The Nyblade L et al. study from Kenya emphasizes the perception of stigma among sex workers.  In a large sample of 497 females and 232 males, most reported experiencing stigma both verbal and measured from health care workers. For female sex workers, the anticipation of such stigma led to avoidance of health services for both HIV and non-HIV related conditions. In order to provide effective services for key populations, health care workers must be trained to be non-judgemental.  HIV services need to be provided in the context of an overall package of health care.

A study from Europe used ecological data to explore structural risks for HIV among sex workers.  Reeves A and colleagues used regression modelling with data on sex work policies from 27 countries.  They showed a strong correlation between criminalisation of sex work and higher prevalence of HIV among sex workers.  Although they included other factors such as the level of economic development and using drugs, the relatively small number of data points does mean that there may be other confounding factors that could not be measured or adjusted for.

Significant association between perceived HIV related stigma and late presentation for HIV/AIDS care in low and middle-income countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Gesesew HA, Tesfay Gebremedhin A, Demissie TD, Kerie MW, Sudhakar M, Mwanri L. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 30;12(3):e0173928. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173928.eCollection 2017.

Background: Late presentation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care is a major impediment for the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) outcomes. The role that stigma plays as a potential barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment of HIV among people living with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is ambivalent. This review aimed to assess the best available evidence regarding the association between perceived HIV related stigma and time to present for HIV/AIDS care.

Methods: Quantitative studies conducted in English language between 2002 and 2016 that evaluated the association between HIV related stigma and late presentation for HIV care were sought across four major databases. This review considered studies that included the following outcome: 'late HIV testing', 'late HIV diagnosis' and 'late presentation for HIV care after testing'. Data were extracted using a standardized Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) data extraction tool. Meta- analysis was undertaken using Revman-5 software. I2 and chi-square test were used to assess heterogeneity. Summary statistics were expressed as pooled odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals and corresponding p-value.

Results: Ten studies from low- and middle- income countries met the search criteria, including six (6) and four (4) case control studies and cross-sectional studies respectively. The total sample size in the included studies was 3788 participants. Half (5) of the studies reported a significant association between stigma and late presentation for HIV care. The meta-analytical association showed that people who perceived high HIV related stigma had two times more probability of late presentation for HIV care than who perceived low stigma (pooled odds ratio = 2.4; 95%CI: 1.6-3.6, I2 = 79%).

Conclusions: High perceptions of HIV related stigma influenced timely presentation for HIV care. In order to avoid late HIV care presentation due the fear of stigma among patients, health professionals should play a key role in informing and counselling patients on the benefits of early HIV testing or early entry to HIV care. Additionally, linking the systems and positive case tracing after HIV testing should be strengthened.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

The relationship between health worker stigma and uptake of HIV counseling and testing and utilization of non-HIV health services: the experience of male and female sex workers in Kenya.

Nyblade L, Reddy A, Mbote D, Kraemer J, Stockton M, Kemunto C, Krotki K, Morla J, Njuguna S, Dutta A, Barker C. AIDS Care. 2017 Mar 22:1-9. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2017.1307922. [Epub ahead of print]

The barrier HIV-stigma presents to the HIV treatment cascade is increasingly documented; however less is known about female and male sex worker engagement in and the influence of sex-work stigma on the HIV care continuum. While stigma occurs in all spheres of life, stigma within health services may be particularly detrimental to health seeking behaviors. Therefore, we present levels of sex-work stigma from healthcare workers (HCW) among male and female sex workers in Kenya, and explore the relationship between sex-work stigma and HIV counseling and testing. We also examine the relationship between sex-work stigma and utilization of non-HIV health services. A snowball sample of 497 female sex workers (FSW) and 232 male sex workers (MSW) across four sites was recruited through a modified respondent-driven sampling process. About 50% of both male and female sex workers reported anticipating verbal stigma from HCW while 72% of FSW and 54% of MSW reported experiencing at least one of seven measured forms of stigma from HCW. In general, stigma led to higher odds of reporting delay or avoidance of counseling and testing, as well as non-HIV specific services. Statistical significance of relationships varied across type of health service, type of stigma and gender. For example, anticipated stigma was not a significant predictor of delay or avoidance of health services for MSW; however, FSW who anticipated HCW stigma had significantly higher odds of avoiding (OR = 2.11) non-HIV services, compared to FSW who did not. This paper adds to the growing evidence of stigma as a roadblock in the HIV treatment cascade, as well as its undermining of the human right to health. While more attention is being paid to addressing HIV-stigma, it is equally important to address the key population stigma that often intersects with HIV-stigma.

Abstract access 

National sex work policy and HIV prevalence among sex workers: an ecological regression analysis of 27 European countries.

Reeves A, Steele S, Stuckler D, McKee M, Amato-Gauci A, Semenza JC. Lancet HIV. 2017 Mar;4(3):e134-e140. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30217-X. Epub2017 Jan 25.

Background: Sex workers are disproportionately affected by HIV compared with the general population. Most studies of HIV risk among sex workers have focused on individual-level risk factors, with few studies assessing potential structural determinants of HIV risk. In this Article, we examine whether criminal laws around sex work are associated with HIV prevalence among female sex workers.

Method: We estimate cross-sectional, ecological regression models with data from 27 European countries on HIV prevalence among sex workers from the European Centre for Disease Control; sex-work legislation from the US State Department's Country Reports on Human Rights Practices and country-specific legal documents; the rule of law and gross-domestic product per capita, adjusted for purchasing power, from the World Bank; and the prevalence of injecting drug use among sex workers. Although data from two countries include male sex workers, the numbers are so small that the findings here essentially pertain to prevalence in female sex workers.

Findings: Countries that have legalised some aspects of sex work (n=17) have significantly lower HIV prevalence among sex workers than countries that criminalise all aspects of sex work (n=10; β=-2·09, 95% CI -0·80 to -3·37;p=0·003), even after controlling for the level of economic development (β=-1·86; p=0·038) and the proportion of sex workers who are injecting drug users (-1·93;p=0·026). We found that the relation between sex work policy and HIV among sex workers might be partly moderated by the effectiveness and fairness of enforcement, suggesting legalisation of some aspects of sex work could reduce HIV among sex workers to the greatest extent in countries where enforcement is fair and effective.

Interpretation: Our findings suggest that the legalisation of some aspects of sex work might help reduce HIV prevalence in this high-risk group, particularly in countries where the judiciary is effective and fair.

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Integration of reproductive health and rights

Editor’s notes: Integration of reproductive health services and rights needs to be well coordinated with HIV services, so a randomized trial of integration of family planning services into HIV care clinics in Kenya by Cohen CR and colleagues is encouraging.  In their initial randomized trial, 12 clinics were randomly selected for early integration using resources from the study team, while six were delayed.  Subsequently the Ministry of Health took over the integration and provision of “one stop shop” services at all 18 clinics.  The improvements in contraceptive uptake and decreased pregnancy rates that had been observed in the first phase were maintained during the second phase giving more confidence that it was truly the integrated nature of the services rather than the presence of special study team that had led to the difference.

Another major push for integration or coordination between HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights services is around the prevention of cervical cancer.  Cervical cancer is caused by long-term infection with specific types of human papilloma virus.  Women living with HIV are at considerably increased risk of cervical cancer compared to their HIV-negative peers.  A large cohort study by Kelly HA et al. in Burkina Faso and South Africa has shown that women living with HIV, attending clinical care services have a high prevalence (59-79% at baseline), incidence (48%) and persistence (up to 70% for some types) of HR-HPV and correspondingly a high prevalence and incidence of cervical neoplasia. There are two HPV vaccines currently available, the first prevents HPV types 16 and 18 (the causes of around 70% of cervical cancer) while the newer (and currently more expensive) vaccine prevents nine types (that cause at least 90% of cervical cancer).  HPV vaccination is recommended to be given before sexual debut, as it gives high protection against the specific types of HPV prior to acquisition.  The dynamics of the many different types of HPV after acquisition is less clear.  The virus is often acquired and they may be cleared or may persist.  So this study provides important background data for understanding the possible role of vaccination and also which types are most associated with pre-cancers (cervical Intra-epithelial neoplasia [CIN]) that can be treated and cured relatively easily.  In particular, in this study, HPV58, which is in the same (alpha-9) family as HPV16 showed the greatest association with CIN2+.  HPV58 is included in the newer nonavalent vaccine, but not the current bi- or quadrivalent vaccine.  Overall this is an area where we need more research on the impact of vaccination and screening programmes for women living with HIV, but in the meantime, HPV vaccination for school girls (and boys) is an investment in the future, since these vaccines are effective ways to stop people dying of cervical (and other HPV-related) cancers.

One of the challenges for integrated reproductive services is to continue to emphasize the importance of condoms for protection against HIV and sexually transmitted infections even if other methods are being used for contraception.  Such “dual protection” is particularly hard to achieve in married or cohabiting couples despite evidence of ongoing risk of HIV infection.  A study in 2388 urban 18-24 year old individuals in Zambia (69% female; 35% married) shows that condom use is still much too low with only 45% reporting that they had used a condom in the last 12 months. As might be anticipated, the study found that the poorest and people who were married were least likely to use condoms while people who discussed contraception and agreed to use condoms were more likely to do so [Pinchoff J et al.] The importance of dual protection, and of promoting broader HIV prevention messages to women through integrated (or at least coordinated) reproductive health and rights services is made even more important given the possibility that depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) as a long acting reversible contraceptive may increase the risk of HIV acquisition.  WHO has recently changed their guidance to make such contraceptives grade 2 in the Medical Eligibility for Contraceptives (MEC) guidelines.

Integration of family planning services into HIV care clinics: Results one year after a cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya.

Cohen CR, Grossman D, Onono M, Blat C, Newmann SJ, Burger RL, Shade SB, Bett N, Bukusi EA. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 22;12(3):e0172992. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172992.eCollection 2017.

Objectives: To determine if integration of family planning (FP) and HIV services led to increased use of more effective contraception (i.e. hormonal and permanent methods, and intrauterine devices) and decreased pregnancy rates.

Design: Cohort analysis following cluster randomized trial, when the Kenya Ministry of Health led integration of the remaining control (delayed integration) sites and oversaw integrated services at the original intervention (early integration) sites.

Setting: Eighteen health facilities in Kenya.

Subjects: Women aged 18-45 receiving care: 5682 encounters at baseline, and 11 628 encounters during the fourth quarter of year 2.

Intervention: "One-stop shop" approach to integrating FP and HIV services.

Main outcome measures: Use of more effective contraceptive methods and incident pregnancy across two years of follow-up.

Results: Following integration of FP and HIV services at the six delayed integration clinics, use of more effective contraception increased from 31.7% to 44.2% of encounters (+12.5%; Prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.39 (1.19-1.63). Among the twelve early integration sites, the proportion of encounters at which women used more effective contraceptive methods was sustained from the end of the first to the second year of follow-up (37.5% vs. 37.0%). Pregnancy incidence including all 18 integrated sites in year two declined in comparison to the control arm in year one (rate ratio: 0.72; 95% CI 0.60-0.87).

Conclusions: Integration of FP services into HIV clinics led to a sustained increase in the use of more effective contraceptives and decrease in pregnancy incidence 24 months following implementation of the integrated service model.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01001507.

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Associations of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes with high-grade cervical neoplasia (CIN2+) in a cohort of women living with HIV in Burkina Faso and South Africa.

Kelly HA, Ngou J, Chikandiwa A, Sawadogo B, Gilham C, Omar T, Lompo O, Doutre S), Meda N, Weiss HA, Delany-Moretlwe S, Segondy M, Mayaud P; HARP Study Group. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 23;12(3):e0174117. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174117.eCollection 2017.

Objective: To describe associations of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in women living with HIV (WLHIV) in Burkina Faso (BF) and South Africa (SA).

Methods: Prospective cohort of WLHIV attending HIV outpatient clinics and treatment centres. Recruitment was stratified by ART status. Cervical HPV genotyping using INNO-LiPA and histological assessment of 4-quadrant cervical biopsies at enrolment and 16 months later.

Results: Among women with CIN2+ at baseline, the prevalence of any HR-HPV genotypes included in the bi/quadrivalent (HPV16/18) or nonavalent (HPV16/18/31/35/45/52/58) HPV vaccines ranged from 37% to 90%. HPV58 was most strongly associated with CIN2+ (aOR = 5.40, 95%CI: 2.77-10.53). At 16-months follow-up, persistence of any HR-HPV was strongly associated with incident CIN2+ (aOR = 7.90, 95%CI: 3.11-20.07), as was persistence of HPV16/18 (aOR = 5.25,95%CI: 2.14-12.91) and the additional HR types in the nonavalent vaccine (aOR =3.23, 95%CI: 1.23-8.54).

Conclusion: HR-HPV persistence is very common among African WLHIV and is linked to incident CIN2+. HPV vaccines could prevent between 37-90% of CIN2+ among African WLHIV.

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Why don't urban youth in Zambia use condoms? The influence of gender and marriage on non-use of male condoms among young adults.

Pinchoff J, Boyer CB, Mutombo N, Chowdhuri RN, Ngo TD. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 23;12(3):e0172062. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172062.eCollection 2017.

Background: Zambia experiences high unmet need for family planning and high rates of HIV, particularly among youth. While male condoms are widely available and 95%of adults have heard of them, self-reported use in the past 12 months is low among young adults (45%). This study describes factors associated with non-use of male condoms among urban young adults in Zambia.

Methods: A household cross-sectional survey in four urban districts was conducted from November 2015 to January 2016 among sexually active young adults ages 18-24 years. A random walk strategy was implemented in urban areas; eligible, enrolled participants were administered a survey on household characteristics, health access, and knowledge, attitudes and practices related to contraception. Relative risk regression models were built to determine factors associated with the decision to not use a male condom (non-use) at most recent sexual intercourse.

Results: A total of 2388 individuals were interviewed; 69% were female, 35% were married, and average lifetime sex partners was 3.45 (SD±6.15). Non-use of male condoms was 59% at most recent sexual intercourse. In a multivariate model, women were more likely to report non-use of a male condom compared with men (aRR = 1.24[95% CI: 1.11, 1.38]), married individuals were more likely to report non-use compared with unmarried individuals (aRR = 1.59 [1.46, 1.73]), and those residing in the highest poverty wards were more likely to report non-use compared with those in the lowest poverty wards (aRR = 1.31 [1.16, 1.48]). Those with more negative perceptions of male condom use were 6% more likely to report non-use (aRR = 1.06 [1.03, 1.09]). Discussion regarding contraception with a partner decreased non-use 13% (aRR = 0.87 [0.80, 0.95]) and agreement regarding male condom use with a partner decreased non-use 16% (aRR = 0.84 [0.77, 0.91)]).

Discussion: Non-use of male condoms is high among young, married adults, particularly women, who may be interested in contraception for family planning but remain at risk of STI infection. Effective marketing strategy of dual protection methods to this population is critical.

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Africa
Burkina Faso, Kenya, South Africa, Zambia
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Infectious co-morbidities – why are people still dying of advanced HIV infections?

Editor’s notes: Tuberculosis remains the biggest reported killer of people living with HIV.  Studies from Guangxi, China and Nigeria examine risk factors for tuberculosis.  In the Chinese study, Cui Z and colleagues found almost one in six of 1019 people receiving care for HIV had active tuberculosis.  The risk factors that they found when comparing these 160 people with tuberculosis to matched controls living with HIV but without tuberculosis were well-known (low CD4 cell count, smoking and non-use of ART).  Long duration of HIV infection was also independently associated with developing tuberculosis, emphasising the need for tuberculosis specific measures in addition to ART.  The authors recommend standard approaches that need to be strengthened (active screening and case-finding with early initiation of ART; isoniazid preventive therapy and better infection control).  The most extraordinary statistic is how much higher the rate of tuberculosis is among this group of people receiving HIV care than it is among the general population of Guangxi.  173 times higher is pretty impressive!

The Pathmanathan I et al. study in Nigeria, carried out as part of a broader analysis of the outcomes of a nationally representative sample of people taking ART, is more optimistic.  The incidence rate for tuberculosis once people started on ART was 0.57 per 100 person years, which compares quite favourably with the estimated incidence for Nigeria from the WHO Global Tuberculosis 2016 report [link] of 0.32 per 100 person years.  Furthermore, most of the incident tuberculosis occurred soon after starting ART and (as might be expected) was most common in people with low CD4 count; previous tuberculosis or suspected but not diagnosed tuberculosis on starting ART.  Once people’s CD4 count was above 200 cells per ml, the incidence rate was 0.29 per 100 person-years.  This is encouraging, as it suggests that a good ART programme could have a significant impact on the overall risk of tuberculosis.  The aim of collaborative tuberculosis and HIV programme efforts must be to find people living with HIV before they are so immunocompromised.  In this study, the average CD4 count at enrolment was less than 200 cells per ml and around 5% of people already had tuberculosis at that time.

Late HIV diagnosis was also the subject of a study from Jiangsu province in China.  Hu H and colleagues looked at the trends in HIV testing and presentation to care before the CD4 count fell below 350 cells per ml.  From 2011-2014 in cross-sectional annual community based surveys among around 2500 men who have sex with men (MSM), there was a modest decline in the proportion who had had an HIV test within the last 12 months from 60% to 53%, and late presentation remained stable around 40%.  We have to shift from this plateau and the authors point out that HIV self-tests seem highly acceptable to MSM in China and that social media and internet based advocacy might also help.

There is increasing interest in co-infections with hepatitis B and C viruses in people living with HIV.  Hepatitis B is widespread in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa with “horizontal” transmission occurring in childhood.  Vaccination is now included as part of some countries programmes on expanded immunisation.  Co-infection with HIV and Hepatitis B leads to more rapid progression of liver damage and to liver cancer. Seremba E and colleagues tested stored sera from people living with HIV in the Rakai community and found that around half had already been infected with hepatitis B (in line with the high prevalence of infection in children).  During the follow up samples from people who were hepatitis B negative, new infections with hepatitis B occurred in 39 individuals, giving an incidence rate of 1.2 per 100 person years.  While hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for people living with HIV who are not infected, this study shows that ART is also protective, particularly if it contains lamivudine or tenofovir.  So this may be an added benefit of the wider scale-up of ART.

Despite advance in ART, too many people still die with HIV-associated infections that are only seen at low CD4 cell counts.  An important example is cryptococcal meningitis, which causes an insidious onset of symptoms. By the time patients are seen at the hospital with severe headache and signs of raised intracranial pressure it is often too late to prevent them from dying. This is because the best medicines (liposomal amphotericin and flucytosine) are expensive and often not available.  So WHO recommends pre-emptive treatment for people who are first seen at the health service with CD4 counts less than 100 cells per ml and with cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) detectable in the blood.  A modelling study by Ramachandran A et al. from Uganda and the US considered the likely costs and benefits of using a new lateral flow assay for CRAG for people living with HIV with a low CD4 count, with pre-emptive treatment with fluconazole for people found to be CRAG-positive. The results, including various sensitivity tests, are strongly in favour of widespread implementation of this strategy. The authors calculate that it would cost Uganda around US$650 000 per year and would avert more than a thousand deaths.  Like the tuberculosis discussions above, the real aim is to prevent people living with HIV reaching the stage where “old-fashioned” opportunistic infections can cause such misery.  However in the medium term, we are likely to continue to see many people presenting late in the course of their infections, and CRAG (and tuberculosis) screening and management are key ways to prevent mortality.

Risk factors associated with Tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV/AIDS: A pair-matched case-control study in Guangxi, China.

Cui Z, Lin M, Nie S, Lan R. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 30;12(3):e0173976. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0173976.eCollection 2017.

Background: As one of the poorest provinces in China, Guangxi has a high HIV and TB prevalence, with the annual number of TB/HIV cases reported by health department among the highest in the country. However, studies on the burden of TB-HIV co-infection and risk factors for active TB among HIV-infected persons in Guangxi have rarely been reported.

Objective: To investigate the risk factors for active TB among people living with HIV/AIDS in Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, China.

Methods: A surveillance survey was conducted of 1019 HIV-infected patients receiving care at three AIDS prevention and control departments between 2013 and 2015. We investigated the cumulative prevalence of TB during 2 years. To analyze risk factors associated with active TB, we conducted a 1:1 pair-matched case-control study of newly reported active TB/HIV co-infected patients. Controls were patients with HIV without active TB, latent TB infection or other lung disease, who were matched with the case group based on sex and age (± 3 years).

Results: A total of 1019 subjects were evaluated. 160 subjects (15.70%) were diagnosed with active TB, including 85 clinically diagnosed cases and 75 confirmed cases. We performed a 1:1 matched case-control study, with 82 TB/HIV patients and 82 people living with HIV/AIDS based on surveillance site, sex and age (±3) years. According to multivariate analysis, smoking (OR = 2.996, 0.992-9.053), lower CD4+ T-cell count (OR = 3.288, 1.161-9.311), long duration of HIV-infection (OR = 5.946, 2.221-15.915) and non-use of ART (OR = 7.775, 2.618-23.094) were independent risk factors for TB in people living with HIV/AIDS.

Conclusion: The prevalence of active TB among people living with HIV/AIDS in Guangxi was 173 times higher than general population in Guangxi. It is necessary for government to integrate control planning and resources for the two diseases. Medical and public health workers should strengthen health education for TB/HIV prevention and treatment and promote smoking cessation. Active TB case finding and early initiation of ART is necessary to minimize the burden of disease among patients with HIV, as is IPT and infection control in healthcare facilities.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria, 2004-2012.

Pathmanathan I, Dokubo EK, Shiraishi RW, Agolory SG, Auld AF, Onotu D, Odafe S, Dalhatu I, Abiri O, Debem HC, Bashorun A, Ellerbrock T. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 10;12(3):e0173309. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173309.eCollection 2017.

Background: Nigeria had the most AIDS-related deaths worldwide in 2014 (170 000), and 46% were associated with tuberculosis (TB). Although treatment of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces TB-associated morbidity and mortality, incident TB can occur while on ART. We estimated incidence and characterized factors associated with TB after ART initiation in Nigeria.

Methods: We analyzed retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adult patients on ART. Data were abstracted from 3496 patient records, and analyses were weighted and controlled for a complex survey design. We performed domain analyses on patients without documented TB disease and used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess factors associated with TB incidence after ART.

Results: At ART initiation, 3350 patients (95.8%) were not receiving TB treatment. TB incidence after ART initiation was 0.57 per 100 person-years, and significantly higher for patients with CD4<50/μL (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]:4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-12.7) compared with CD4≥200/μL. Patients with suspected but untreated TB at ART initiation and those with a history of prior TB were more likely to develop incident TB (AHR: 12.2, 95% CI: 4.5-33.5 and AHR: 17.6, 95% CI: 3.5-87.9, respectively).

Conclusion: Incidence of TB among PLHIV after ART initiation was low, and predicted by advanced HIV, prior TB, and suspected but untreated TB. Study results suggest a need for improved TB screening and diagnosis, particularly among high-risk PLHIV initiating ART, and reinforce the benefit of early ART and other TB prevention efforts.

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Trends in late HIV diagnosis among men who have sex with men in Jiangsu province, China: Results from four consecutive community-based surveys, 2011-2014.

Hu H, Yan H, Liu X, Xu X, Xu J, Qiu T, Shi LE, Fu G, HuanX, McFarland W, Wei C). PLoS One. 2017 Mar 9;12(3):e0172664. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0172664.eCollection 2017.

Objectives: To examine trends in HIV testing, late HIV diagnosis and associated factors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jiangsu province, China.

Methods: Four consecutive community-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted among MSM from 2011 to 2014 in eight cities in the province. Participants were recruited from MSM venues and via the internet. HIV bio-behavioral surveys were conducted to collect demographic and behavioral data and measure HIV infection. HIV-infected participants with CD4 counts less than 350 cells/µL were defined as having a late HIV diagnosis. Chi-square trend tests were used to compare temporal changes over the years and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with late diagnosis.

Results: A total of 2441, 2677, 2591 and 2610 participants were enrolled in 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively. Testing for HIV in the last 12 months decreased over the time period, from 59.9% to 52.5% (p<0.001). Late HIV diagnosis remained high and steady, ranging from 33.3% to 44.2% over the years with no significant change over time (p = 0.418). MSM who were older than 24 years (aOR =1.748, p = 0.020 for 25-39 years old; aOR = 3.148, p<0.001 for 40 years old or older), were recruited via internet (aOR = 1.596, p = 0.024), and did not have an HIV test in the past 12 months (aOR = 3.385, p<0.001) were more likely to be late diagnosed.

Conclusions: Our study showed a plateau in HIV testing among MSM in China, in parallel to high levels of late diagnosis. Emerging and innovative strategies such as HIV self-testing and reaching more MSM by internet, both highly acceptable to MSM in China, may reduce late diagnosis.

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Hepatitis B incidence and prevention with antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive individuals in Uganda.

Seremba E, Ssempijja V, Kalibbala S, Gray RH, Wawer MJ, Nalugoda F, Casper C, Phipps W, Ocama P, Serwadda D, Thomas DL, Reynolds SJ. 123. AIDS. 2017 Mar 27;31(6):781-786. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001399.

Objective: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) may interfere with replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV), raising the hypothesis that HBV infection might be prevented by ART. We investigated the incidence and risk factors associated with HBV among HIV-infected adults in Rakai, Uganda.

Methods: We screened stored sera from 944 HIV-infected adults enrolled in the Rakai Community Cohort Study between September 2003 and March 2015 for evidence of HBV exposure. Serum from participants who tested anti-hepatitis B core-negative (497) at baseline were tested over 3-7 consecutive survey rounds for incident HBV. Poisson incidence methods were used to estimate incidence of HBV with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), whereas Cox proportional regression methods were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs).

Results: Thirty-nine HBV infections occurred over 3342 person-years, incidence1.17/100 person-years. HBV incidence was significantly lower with ART use: 0.49/100 person-years with ART and 2.3/100 person-years without ART [adjusted HR (aHR) 0.25, 95% CI 0.1-0.5, P < 0.001], and with lamivudine (3TC) use: (0.58/100 person-years) with 3TC and 2.25/100 person-years without 3TC (aHR 0.32, 95% CI0.1-0.7, P =  < 0.007). No new HBV infections occurred among those on tenofovir-based ART. HBV incidence also decreased with HIV RNA suppression: 0.6/100 person-years with 400 copies/ml or less and 4.0/100 person-years with more than 400 copies/ml (aHR, 6.4, 95% CI 2.2-19.0, P < 0.001); and with age: 15-29 years versus 40-50 years (aHR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2-9.0); 30-39 years versus 40-50 years (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 0.9-5.3).

Conclusion: HBV continues to be acquired in adulthood among HIV-positive Ugandans and HBV incidence is dramatically reduced with HBV-active ART. In addition to widespread vaccination, initiation of ART may prevent HBV acquisition among HIV-positive adults in sub-Saharan Africa.

Abstract access 

Cost-effectiveness of CRAG-LFA screening for cryptococcal meningitis among people living with HIV in Uganda.

Ramachandran A(1), Manabe Y(1,)(2), Rajasingham R(3), Shah M(4).141. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Mar 23;17(1):225. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2325-9.

Background: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) constitutes a significant source of mortality in resource-limited regions. Cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) can be detected in the blood before onset of meningitis. We sought to determine the cost-effectiveness of implementing CRAG screening using the recently developed CRAG lateral flow assay in Uganda compared to current practice without screening.

Methods: A decision-analytic model was constructed to compare two strategies for cryptococcal prevention among people living with HIV with CD4 < 100 in Uganda: No cryptococcal screening vs. CRAG screening with WHO-recommended preemptive treatment for CRAG-positive patients. The model was constructed to reflect primary HIV clinics in Uganda, with a cohort of HIV-infected patients withCD4 < 100 cells/µL. Primary outcomes were expected costs, DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). We evaluated varying levels of programmatic implementation in secondary analysis.

Results: CRAG screening was considered highly cost-effective and was associated with an ICER of $6.14 per DALY averted compared to no screening (95% uncertainty range: $-20.32 to $36.47). Overall, implementation of CRAG screening was projected to cost $1.52 more per person, and was projected to result in a 40% relative reduction in cryptococcal-associated mortality. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, CRAG screening was cost-effective in 100% of scenarios and cost saving (ie cheaper and more effective than no screening) in 30% of scenarios. Secondary analysis projected a total cost of $651 454 for 100%implementation of screening nationally, while averting 1228 deaths compared to no screening.

Conclusion: CRAG screening for PLWH with low CD4 represents excellent value for money with the potential to prevent cryptococcal morbidity and mortality in Uganda.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Africa, Asia
China, Nigeria, Uganda
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Keeping up appearances – the reasons people living with HIV who are not yet ill, give for starting ART

Factors that motivated otherwise healthy HIV-positive young adults to access HIV testing and treatment in South Africa.

Lambert RF, Orrell C, Bangsberg DR, Haberer JE. AIDS Behav. 2017 Feb 11. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1704-y. [Epub ahead of print]

The World Health Organization recommends early initiation of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all those infected with the virus at any CD4 count. Successfully reaching individuals with relatively high CD4 counts depends in large part on healthy individuals seeking testing and treatment; however, little is known about factors motivating this decision. We conducted a qualitative study to explore this issue among 25 young HIV-positive adults (age 18-35) with a CD4 count >350 cells/mm3 who recently started or made the decision to start ART in Gugulethu, South Africa. Using an inductive content analytical approach, we found that most individuals sought testing and treatment early in the disease progression because of a desire to appear healthy thereby avoiding stigma associated with AIDS. Other factors included social support, responsibilities and aspirations, normalcy of having HIV, and accessible services. These findings suggest that maintenance of physical appearance should be included in the development of novel testing and treatment interventions.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: A lot has been written on why people delay entry into care, when they are living with HIV. The guidance that all people living with HIV should now start treatment means that many people who are healthy are being offered treatment. The authors of this paper found that in a small sample of people in South Africa, looking healthy mattered. There was a value in the message that ART could maintain health, and in the words of one participant in their study, to ‘remain beautiful’. In addition, other positive anticipated results of taking ART emerged from the data. Young people saw the benefit in maintaining their health so they can help their family in the future, for example. However, despite the positive messages on appearance and a future role for the family and society, many concerns remained. Participants wanted privacy to live with HIV without others knowing. Fears of stigma, fears of an altered appearance and faltering strength haunted participants. The authors stress the value of the positive messaging of ART as an aid to sustaining a healthy appearance. They suggest that this messaging could be used to encourage people to start ART promptly. 

Africa
South Africa
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Measuring adherence – a promising approach with caregivers of children living with HIV

Improved adherence to antiretroviral therapy observed among HIV-infected children whose caregivers had positive beliefs in medicine in sub-Saharan Africa.

Abongomera G, Cook A, Musiime V, Chabala C, Lamorde M, Abach J, Thomason M, Mulenga V, Kekitiinwa A, Colebunders R, Kityo C, Walker AS, Gibb DM. AIDS Behav. 2017 Feb;21(2):441-449. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1582-8.

A high level of adherence to antiretroviral treatment is essential for optimal clinical outcomes in HIV infection, but measuring adherence is difficult. We investigated whether responses to a questionnaire eliciting caregiver beliefs in medicines were associated with adherence of their child (median age 2.8 years), and whether this in turn was associated with viral suppression. We used the validated beliefs in medicine questionnaire (BMQ) to measure caregiver beliefs, and medication event monitoring system caps to measure adherence. We found significant associations between BMQ scores and adherence, and between adherence and viral suppression. Among children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), we also found significant associations between BMQ 'necessity' scores, and BMQ 'necessity-concerns' scores, and later viral suppression. This suggests that the BMQ may be a valuable tool when used alongside other adherence measures, and that it remains important to keep caregivers well informed about the long-term necessity of their child's ART.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: How we measure adherence to antiretroviral therapy has long been a challenge within HIV clinical care. We need to know who is struggling with their HIV treatment so that we can provide support to improve their treatment taking behaviour before treatment resistance and other complex clinical problems take hold. This can be an especially relevant concern for children who will need to take HIV treatment throughout their lives. The analysis within this paper proffers a relatively accessible means to identify families who are more likely to encounter adherence problems. This potentially allows people to receive pre-emptive support before clinical problems arise. 

The authors tested their hypothesis that the children of caregivers who had concerns about the overuse and associated toxicity of medicine and/or had strong beliefs in divine intervention as curative, relative to their belief in the necessity of medicines, would be less likely to be virally suppressed. Such beliefs were measured in a validated ‘belief in medicine’ questionnaire. Although this was used within a clinical trial setting it is potentially simple enough to feasibly be used in more general clinical settings. This measure could identify particular ‘at-risk’ caregiver groups to inform not only the provision of tailored adherence support but also at which critical time points such support should be delivered.

Africa
Uganda, Zambia
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Only a quarter of people living with HIV in South Africa virally suppressed

The continuum of HIV care in South Africa: implications for achieving the second and third UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets.

Takuva S, Brown AE, Pillay Y, Delpech V, Puren AJ. AIDS. 2017 Feb 20;31(4):545-552. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001340.

Background: We characterize engagement with HIV care in South Africa in 2012 to identify areas for improvement towards achieving global 90-90-90 targets.

Methods: Over 3.9 million CD4 cell count and 2.7 million viral load measurements reported in 2012 in the public sector were extracted from the national laboratory electronic database. The number of persons living with HIV (PLHIV), number and proportion in HIV care, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and with viral suppression (viral load <400 copies/ml) were estimated and stratified by sex and age group. Modified Poisson regression approach was used to examine associations between sex, age group and viral suppression among persons on ART.

Results: We estimate that among 6 511 000 PLHIV in South Africa in 2012, 3 300 000 individuals (50.7%) accessed care and 32.9% received ART. Although viral suppression was 73.7% among the treated population in 2012, the overall percentage of persons with viral suppression among all PLHIV was 23.8%. Linkage to HIV care was lower among men (38.5%) than among women (57.2%). Overall, 47.1% of those aged 0-14 years and 47.0% of those aged 15-49 years were linked to care compared with 56.2% among those aged above 50 years.

Conclusion: Around a quarter of all PLHIV have achieved viral suppression in South Africa. Men and younger persons have poorer linkage to HIV care. Expanding HIV testing, strengthening prompt linkage to care and further expansion of ART are needed for South Africa to reach the 90-90-90 target. Focus on these areas will reduce the transmission of new HIV infections and mortality in the general population.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: To maximise the impact of ART, people living with HIV should be diagnosed early, enrolled and initiated on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and retained in ART care. Long-term adherence to achieve and maintain viral load suppression is the last step in the continuum of HIV care. Engagement along the complete treatment cascade will determine the long-term success of the global response to HIV.

In this manuscript, the authors used a combination of national HIV prevalence estimates and routine data collected through the National Health Laboratory Service to construct and characterize the different stages of the HIV care continuum in South Africa.

They estimate that, despite the expansion of the ART programme in South Africa, only about a quarter of people living with HIV were virally suppressed in 2012, contrasting with recent estimates from Botswana where about 70% of people living with HIV were reported to be virally suppressed. They estimate that only about half of all people living with HIV accessed care, but report that, once in care, the ART programme proves to be effective with three-quarters of people on ART achieving virologic suppression. Not surprisingly they found that men and younger persons have poorer linkage to care. They recommend that HIV testing needs to be expanded, and linkage to care needs to be promoted for people testing HIV-positive, if the UNAIDS 90-90-90 treatment target is to be reached.

This paper illustrates how, in the context of a national public sector laboratory diagnostic service, routine laboratory data can be used to monitor the public health response to HIV at a national level. 

Africa
South Africa
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