Articles tagged as "Asia"

Peer led activities increase HIV testing uptake among MSM

Effectiveness of peer-led interventions to increase HIV testing among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Shangani S, Escudero D, Kirwa K, Harrison A, Marshall B, Operario D. AIDS Care. 2017 Feb 2:1-11. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2017.1282105. [Epub ahead of print]

HIV testing constitutes a key step along the continuum of HIV care. Men who have sex with men (MSM) have low HIV testing rates and delayed diagnosis, especially in low-resource settings. Peer-led interventions offer a strategy to increase testing rates in this population. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes evidence on the effectiveness of peer-led interventions to increase the uptake of HIV testing among MSM. Using a systematic review protocol that was developed a priori, we searched PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL for articles reporting original results of randomized or non-randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental interventions, and pre- and post-intervention studies. Studies were eligible if they targeted MSM and utilized peers to increase HIV testing. We included studies published in or after 1996 to focus on HIV testing during the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Seven studies encompassing a total of 6205 participants met eligibility criteria, including two quasi-experimental studies, four non-randomized pre- and-post intervention studies, and one cluster randomized trial. Four studies were from high-income countries, two were from Asia and only one from sub-Saharan Africa. We assigned four studies a "moderate" methodological rigor rating and three a "strong" rating. Meta-analysis of the seven studies found HIV testing rates were statistically significantly higher in the peer-led intervention groups versus control groups (pooled OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.74-2.31). Among randomized trials, HIV testing rates were significantly higher in the peer-led intervention versus control groups (pooled OR: 2.48, 95% CI 1.99-3.08). Among the non-randomized pre- and post-intervention studies, the overall pooled OR for intervention versus control groups was 1.71 (95% CI 1.42-2.06), with substantial heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 70%, p < 0.02). Overall, peer-led interventions increased HIV testing among MSM but more data from high-quality studies are needed to evaluate effects of peer-led interventions on HIV testing among MSM in low- and middle-income countries.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: A key driver of the HIV epidemic is low uptake of HIV testing in many settings. This leads to a high proportion of individuals living with HIV being unaware of their status, failing to engage with care and treatment and hence being at risk of transmitting HIV to others. Recent reviews have illustrated that programmes led by members of the same peer group can be effective in promoting HIV-associated behavioural change and improving clinical outcomes. Gay men and other men who have sex with men can experience specific challenges associated with engagement with HIV care. This problem is particularly acute in resource poor regions due to very high levels of stigma.

This systematic review is the first to look specifically at the effectiveness of peer-led activities among gay men and other men who have sex with men. Seven studies were found which fulfilled the inclusion criteria of assessing the impact of peer-led activities on HIV testing uptake among gay men and other men who have sex with men. Four of these were in high income settings, and the others in Peru, Taiwan and Kenya. Each study illustrated a positive effect of peer-led activities on increasing HIV testing rates, and meta-analyses illustrated consistent effects when data were stratified by sub-groups (study methodology, study quality or setting). However, the generalizability of these studies to the entire population of gay men and other men who have sex with men is a concern recognized by the authors as the majority used gay-centric community venues to recruit participants. This is likely to exclude individuals who do not self-identify as being part of this community. Two studies, one in Taiwan and the other in Peru, used social-media as a mechanism of recruitment. This approach may lead to a wider recruitment, although not accessible to people without access to the internet.

Overall, this review emphasizes the potential of peer-led activities to overcome barriers to engage with testing and treatment experienced by gay men and other men who have sex with men and other hard to reach and high-risk sub-populations. It also illustrated the very limited current evidence available to assess such programmes.

 

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Pulling out: how to make it work for Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan can achieve ambitious HIV targets despite expected donor withdrawal by combining improved ART procurement mechanisms with allocative and implementation efficiencies.

Shattock AJ, Benedikt C, Bokazhanova A, Duric P, Petrenko I, Ganina L, Kelly SL, Stuart RM, Kerr CC, Vinichenko T, Zhang S, Hamelmann C, Manova M, Masaki E, Wilson DP, Gray RT. PLoS One. 2017 Feb 16;12(2):e0169530. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0169530. eCollection 2017.

Background: Despite a non-decreasing HIV epidemic, international donors are soon expected to withdraw funding from Kazakhstan. Here we analyze how allocative, implementation, and technical efficiencies could strengthen the national HIV response under assumptions of future budget levels.

Methodology: We used the Optima model to project future scenarios of the HIV epidemic in Kazakhstan that varied in future antiretroviral treatment unit costs and management expenditure-two areas identified for potential cost-reductions. We determined optimal allocations across HIV programs to satisfy either national targets or ambitious targets. For each scenario, we considered two cases of future HIV financing: the 2014 national budget maintained into the future and the 2014 budget without current international investment.

Findings: Kazakhstan can achieve its national HIV targets with the current budget by (1) optimally re-allocating resources across programs and (2) either securing a 35% [30%-39%] reduction in antiretroviral treatment drug costs or reducing management costs by 44% [36%-58%] of 2014 levels. Alternatively, a combination of antiretroviral treatment and management cost-reductions could be sufficient. Furthermore, Kazakhstan can achieve ambitious targets of halving new infections and AIDS-related deaths by 2020 compared to 2014 levels by attaining a 67% reduction in antiretroviral treatment costs, a 19% [14%-27%] reduction in management costs, and allocating resources optimally.

Significance: With Kazakhstan facing impending donor withdrawal, it is important for the HIV response to achieve more with available resources. This analysis can help to guide HIV response planners in directing available funding to achieve the greatest yield from investments. The key changes recommended were considered realistic by Kazakhstan country representatives.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: The HIV epidemic in Kazakhstan is concentrated around key populations (such as people who inject drugs, female sex workers and their partners, gay men and other men who have sex with men). Unlike in other settings, incidence has not decreased in recent years. However, as Kazakhstan continues to boom economically, international donors are expected to withdraw from the country in the near future and the responsibility for funding HIV-associated programmes will shift towards the state. This article attempts to explore how different kinds of efficiencies in the distribution of resources could strengthen the national HIV response in the coming years.  

The authors modelled future scenarios of the epidemic in Kazakhstan. They looked at whether and how the country could achieve certain targets by 2020 given its budgetary restrictions. They found that the country could achieve its national targets by either securing a 35% reduction in antiretroviral therapy or reducing management costs by 44%.

The topic this paper covers raises a number of important issues. As national governments move towards covering the totality of spending on HIV prevention and treatment, they will be confronted with the need to fund (using national tax revenues) prevention mechanisms. Their mechanisms are aimed at key populations who are often marginalized. Although funding these types of programmes through donor funding may have not caused political challenges, doing so using the state’s funding may. Government budget allocation is often a highly contentious exercise. Potential shifts in national priority setting following donor withdrawal should not be ignored.

Secondly, focussing on key populations is more costly than focussing on the general population. As prevention programmes cover people in key populations who are easier to reach, efforts should shift towards making prevention available to the harder-to-reach sections of key populations. However, this will further increase unit costs per person reached, and probably per infection averted. Given the decrease in external funding for Kazakhstan, it is important for the national response to budget for these additional costs.  This is a necessity to ensure equity in the access to the HIV response.

Asia
Kazakhstan
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Study finds rectal gel to be safe in men, but not as acceptable for daily use

MTN-017: a rectal phase 2 extended safety and acceptability study of tenofovir reduced-glycerin 1% gel.

Cranston RD, Lama JR, Richardson BA, Carballo-Dieguez A, Kunjara Na Ayudhya RP, Liu K, Patterson KB, Leu CS, Galaska B, Jacobson CE, Parikh UM, Marzinke MA, Hendrix CW, Johnson S, Piper JM, Grossman C, Ho KS, Lucas J, Pickett J, Bekker LG, Chariyalertsak S, Chitwarakorn A, Gonzales P, Holtz TH, Liu AY, Mayer KH, Zorrilla C, Schwartz JL, Rooney J, McGowan I; MTN-017 Protocol Team. Clin Infect Dis. 2016 Dec 16. pii: ciw832. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: HIV disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). Safe and acceptable topical HIV prevention methods that target the rectum are needed.

Methods: MTN-017 was a Phase 2, three-period, randomized sequence, open-label, expanded safety and acceptability crossover study comparing rectally applied reduced-glycerin (RG) 1% tenofovir (TFV) and oral emtricitabine/TFV disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF). In each 8-week study period participants were randomized to RG-TFV rectal gel daily; or RG-TFV rectal gel before and after receptive anal intercourse (RAI) (or at least twice weekly in the event of no RAI); or daily oral FTC/TDF.

Results: MSM and TGW (n=195) were enrolled from 8 sites in the United States, Thailand, Peru, and South Africa with mean age of 31.1 years (range 18-64). There were no differences in Grade 2 or higher adverse event rates in participants using daily gel (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR): 1.09, p=0.59) or RAI gel (IRR: 0.90, p=0.51) compared to FTC/TDF. High adherence (≥80% of prescribed doses as assessed by unused product return and SMS reports) was less likely in the daily gel regimen (Odds Ratio (OR): 0.35, p<0.001) and participants reported less likelihood of future daily gel use for HIV protection compared to FTC/TDF (OR: 0.38, p<0.001).

Conclusions: Rectal application of RG TFV gel was safe in MSM and TGW. Adherence and product use likelihood were similar for the intermittent gel and daily oral FTC/TDF regimens, but lower for the daily gel regimen.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: While microbicide gel to prevent HIV in women has not been consistently shown to be effective, scientific efforts to develop a rectal microbicide gel have continued in the hopes of finding a safe and effective product for HIV prevention in men. This paper presents a phase II clinical trial in which gay men and other men who have sex with men across four different countries were randomly assigned to one of three arms: oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (‘daily oral’), topical gel administered before and after receptive anal intercourse (‘RAI’), and topical gel administered daily (‘daily rectal’). The authors found that the rectal gel was safe to use, and was acceptable to participants, although the daily rectal application had lower acceptability and lower adherence than daily oral or the RAI.  This safety, adherence, and acceptability seen in this Phase II study supports further development of the gel as a rectal microbicide candidate, although consideration will need to be given to dosing regimens to maximize adherence. 

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High prevalence of gender based violence among adolescent female sex workers - need to improve access to health services

Prevalence and correlates of sexual and gender-based violence against Chinese adolescent women who are involved in commercial sex: a cross-sectional study.

Zhang XD, Myers S, Yang HJ, Li Y, Li JH, Luo W, Luchters S. BMJ Open. 2016 Dec 19;6(12):e013409. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013409.

Objectives: Despite the vast quantity of research among Chinese female sex workers (FSWs) to address concerns regarding HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk, there is a paucity of research on issues of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and the missed opportunity for sexual and reproductive health (SRH) promotion among young FSWs. Our research aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of SGBV among Chinese adolescent FSWs, and to explore SRH service utilisation.

Design and methods: A cross-sectional study using a one-stage cluster sampling method was employed. A semistructured questionnaire was administered by trained peer educators or health workers. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine individual and structural correlates of SGBV.

Setting and participants: Between July and September 2012, 310 adolescent women aged 15-20 years, and who self-reported having received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the past 6 months were recruited and completed their interview in Kunming, Yunnan Province, China.

Results: Findings confirm the high prevalence of SGBV against adolescent FSWs in China, with 38% (118/310) of participants affected in the past year. Moreover, our study demonstrated the low uptake of public health services and high rates of prior unwanted pregnancy (52%; 61/118), abortion (53%; 63/118) and self-reported STI symptoms (84%; 99/118) in participants who were exposed to SGBV. Forced sexual debut was reported by nearly a quarter of FSWs (23%; 70/310) and was independently associated with having had a drug-using intimate partner and younger age (<17 years old) at first abortion. When controlling for potential confounders, having experienced SGBV was associated with frequent alcohol use, having self-reported symptoms of STI, having an intimate partner and having an intimate partner with illicit drug use.

Conclusions: This study calls for effective and integrated interventions addressing adolescent FSWs' vulnerability to SGBV and broader SRH consequences.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: The paper reports a study conducted to measure the prevalence and correlates of sexual and gender-based violence among Chinese adolescent female sex workers, given the paucity of data on this. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Yunnan Province, which has a relatively high HIV-1 prevalence. Around 300 women aged 15-19 years, who had received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the past six months were recruited for a survey.

The survey revealed that over half the female sex workers were married or cohabiting but lived predominantly with other sex workers or friends, or alone. The majority reported that they had been a sex worker for less than six months. Over the past year, 82% of the female sex workers had an intimate partner, and most of these relationships were for less than one year. Alcohol use was common, with 83% of the female sex workers reporting drinking alcohol at least twice a week. Inconsistent condom use in the past month was reported by 57% of the female sex workers.

Around a quarter of women’s first sexual experience was forced. Thirty-eight per cent of the female sex workers reported having experienced sexual and gender-based violence in the past year, with three quarters of women reporting the perpetrator as their intimate male partner and (62%) a male paying client. The female sex workers experiencing sexual and gender-based violence in the past year were more likely to be frequent drinkers or have a drug-using intimate partner. Women who experienced sexual and gender-based violence were more likely to report unwanted pregnancy, and less likely to use public health facilities or HIV testing services.

The authors suggest that their findings reveal a missed opportunity for the public health sector to address sexual and gender-based violence and associated sexual and reproductive health issues. However, they suggested there is a need to involve women-led community-based organisations to build relationships with female sex workers to enable them to utilise such services. There is also a need for further research on integrated programmes to prevent or reduce sexual and gender-based violence against adolescent female sex workers. 

Epidemiology, Gender
Asia
China
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Is universal antenatal HIV testing still cost-effective?

Should HIV testing for all pregnant women continue? Cost-effectiveness of universal antenatal testing compared to focused approaches across high to very low HIV prevalence settings.

Ishikawa N, Dalal S, Johnson C, Hogan DR, Shimbo T, Shaffer N, Pendse RN, Lo YR, Ghidinelli MN, Baggaley R. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Dec 14;19(1):21212. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.21212. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: HIV testing is the entry point for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Decreasing external funding for the HIV response in some low- and middle-income countries has triggered the question of whether a focused approach to HIV testing targeting pregnant women in high-burden areas should be considered. This study aimed at determining and comparing the cost-effectiveness of universal and focused HIV testing approaches for pregnant women across high to very low HIV prevalence settings.

Methods: We conducted a modelling analysis on health and cost outcomes of HIV testing for pregnant women using four country-based case scenarios (Namibia, Kenya, Haiti and Viet Nam) to illustrate high, intermediate, low and very low HIV prevalence settings. We used subnational prevalence data to divide each country into high-, medium- and low-burden areas, and modelled different antenatal and testing coverage in each.

Results: When HIV testing services were only focused in high-burden areas within a country, mother-to-child transmission rates remained high ranging from 18 to 23%, resulting in a 25 to 69% increase in new paediatric HIV infections and increased future treatment costs for children. Universal HIV testing was found to be dominant (i.e. more QALYs gained with less cost) compared to focused approaches in the Namibia, Kenya and Haiti scenarios. The universal approach was also very cost-effective compared to focused approaches, with $ 125 per quality-adjusted life years gained in the Viet Nam-based scenario of very low HIV prevalence. Sensitivity analysis further supported the findings.

Conclusions: Universal approach to antenatal HIV testing achieves the best health outcomes and is cost-saving or cost-effective in the long term across the range of HIV prevalence settings. It is further a prerequisite for quality maternal and child healthcare and for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: This paper describes research undertaken to support the consolidated guidelines on HIV testing services, published by World Health Organization in 2015. This analysis was conducted in response to growing questions as to whether focused HIV testing in high prevalence areas can improve value for money in investment for HIV testing.

A model was parameterized to represent four scenarios with high, intermediate, low, and very low HIV prevalence settings (Namibia, Kenya, Haiti, and Viet Nam). Three approaches to HIV testing in antenatal care are considered in comparison with current coverage in each setting. These three approaches were: a very focused approach, a targeted approach, and a universal testing approach for all pregnant women.  The authors estimate the costs and effects of each scenario, including the future costs of treating paediatric HIV for 20 years. Universal testing was found to be cost-saving in Namibia, Kenya and Haiti and was found to be cost-effective in Viet Nam ($125 per QALY gained).  The targeted testing approach was also more cost-effective than current coverage in all settings.

The clear policy implication from this analysis is that HIV testing for pregnant women saves both money and lives in the long term. Universal HIV testing in antenatal care can be regarded as a good investment in almost any HIV prevalence setting. However, it is also important to note that targeted testing was more cost-effective than current coverage in all settings. Countries that are currently struggling to provide testing in antenatal care may need to consider factors other than cost-effectiveness in their planning and strategy for scaling up. This is important in order to address HIV at a national scale.  

Africa, Asia, Latin America
Haiti, Kenya, Namibia, Viet Nam
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Adolescents’ concerns: psychosocial needs of young people living with HIV in Thailand

Psychosocial needs of perinatally HIV-infected youths in Thailand: lessons learnt from instructive counseling.

Manaboriboon B, Lolekha R, Chokephaibulkit K, Leowsrisook P, Naiwatanakul T, Tarugsa J, Durier Y, Aunjit N, Punpanich Vandepitte W, Boon-Yasidhi V. AIDS Care. 2016 Dec;28(12):1615-1622. Epub 2016 Jun 26.

Identifying psychosocial needs of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV) youth is a key step in ensuring good mental health care. We report psychosocial needs of pHIV youth identified using the "Youth Counseling Needs Survey" (YCS) and during individual counseling (IC) sessions. pHIV youth receiving care at two tertiary-care hospitals in Bangkok or at an orphanage in Lopburi province were invited to participate IC sessions. The youths' psychosocial needs were assessed using instructive IC sessions in four main areas: general health, reproductive health, mood, and psychosocial concerns. Prior to the IC session youth were asked to complete the YCS in which their concerns in the four areas were investigated. Issues identified from the YCS and the IC sessions were compared. During October 2010-July 2011, 150 (68.2%) of 220 eligible youths participated in the IC sessions and completed the YCS. Median age was 14 (range 11-18) years and 92 (61.3%) were female. Mean duration of the IC sessions was 36.5 minutes. One-hundred and thirty (86.7%) youths reported having at least one psychosocial problem discovered by either the IC session or the YCS. The most common problems identified during the IC session were poor health attitude and self-care (48.0%), lack of life skills (44.0%), lack of communication skills (40.0%), poor antiretroviral (ARV) adherence (38.7%), and low self-value (34.7%). The most common problems identified by the YCS were lack of communication skills (21.3%), poor health attitude and self-care (14.0%), and poor ARV adherence (12.7%). Youth were less likely to report psychosocial problems in the YCS than in the IC session. Common psychosocial needs among HIV-infected youth were issues about life skills, communication skills, knowledge on self-care, ARV adherence, and self-value. YCS can identify pHIV youths' psychosocial needs but might underestimate issues. Regular IC sessions are useful to detect problems and provide opportunities for counseling.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: The study reports on the psychological needs of young people who acquired HIV in the perinatal period.  The needs were highlighted during counselling sessions and in a survey conducted as part of the Happy-Teen Programme in Thailand. Young people (age 11-18) who have perinatally acquired HIV were recruited in two hospitals and from a service run by an orphanage linked to one of the hospitals. Young people took part in two individual ‘instructive counselling’ sessions, and two survey sessions for a needs-assessment questionnaire. Participants reported higher levels of needs in the counselling sessions compared to the questionnaire. Key areas of need identified included: health attitudes and self-care (e.g., diet, sleep, drug use); issues with sexual risk and difficulties communicating with sexual partners; HIV treatment adherence problems; concerns about HIV-associated stigma; and concerns about peer pressure. The study illustrates the difference in the quality of findings obtained from data collected via the questionnaire in comparison with data collected via sessions with counsellors. The counsellors were people that the young people knew for some time and trusted. The study highlights the importance of counselling with young people to improve self-esteem and health-associated behaviours.  Counsellors are also important to provide referrals for more severe mental health issues. 

Asia
Thailand
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Improving ART adherence: what works?

Interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Kanters S, Park JJ, Chan K, Socias ME, Ford N, Forrest JI, Thorlund K, Nachega JB, Mills EJ. Lancet HIV. 2017 Jan;4(1):e31-e40. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30206-5. Epub 2016 Nov 16.

Background: High adherence to antiretroviral therapy is crucial to the success of HIV treatment. We evaluated comparative effectiveness of adherence interventions with the aim of informing the WHO's global guidance on interventions to increase adherence.

Methods: For this systematic review and network meta-analysis, we searched for randomised controlled trials of interventions that aimed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens in populations with HIV. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and MEDLINE for reports published up to July 16, 2015, and searched major conference abstracts from Jan 1, 2013, to July 16, 2015. We extracted data from eligible studies for study characteristics, interventions, patients' characteristics at baseline, and outcomes for the study populations of interest. We used network meta-analyses to compare adherence and viral suppression for all study settings (global network) and for studies in low-income and middle-income countries only (LMIC network).

Findings: We obtained data from 85 trials with 16 271 participants. Short message service (SMS; text message) interventions were superior to standard of care in improving adherence in both the global network (odds ratio [OR] 1.48, 95% credible interval [CrI] 1.00-2.16) and in the LMIC network (1.49, 1.04-2.09). Multiple interventions showed generally superior adherence to single interventions, indicating additive effects. For viral suppression, only cognitive behavioural therapy (1.46, 1.05-2.12) and supporter interventions (1.28, 1.01-1.71) were superior to standard of care in the global network; none of the interventions improved viral response in the LMIC network. For the global network, the time discrepancy (whether the study outcome was measured during or after intervention was withdrawn) was an effect modifier for both adherence to antiretroviral therapy (coefficient estimate -0.43, 95% CrI -0.75 to -0.11) and viral suppression (-0.48; -0.84 to -0.12), suggesting that the effects of interventions wane over time.

Interpretation: Several interventions can improve adherence and viral suppression; generally, their estimated effects were modest and waned over time.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Maintaining adherence to self-administered medications is difficult. On average, people who are prescribed medications for chronic diseases take fewer than half the prescribed doses. Evidence suggests that in most settings adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is better than this, but there will always be people that struggle to maintain the high levels of adherence required for durable virologic suppression. In this analysis, there was some evidence that specific activities or combinations of activities improved virologic suppression. However, the effect sizes were small and when the analysis was confined to studies in low-income and middle-income countries, there was no evidence to suggest an effect on virologic suppression. Overall the evidence to support any particular activity or combination of activities was not compelling.     

Findings from this analysis have been incorporated into most recent consolidated ART guidelines from the World Health Organization. Trying to summarize complex evidence in this way creates many challenges. Trials were conducted in different populations. Some with all people starting ART, others with people considered to have high risk of suboptimal adherence, and others with people who already had adherence problems. The trials also naturally would have differed in content and quality of the usual package of care to support adherence (the comparator for most programme). 60% of the trials were conducted exclusively in the United States, while others were conducted across different settings.

These are just some of the things that make it difficult to synthesize this evidence into guidance that can be applicable to people living with HIV worldwide. HIV programmes in countries have to decide whether or not to adopt any of these activities that are recommended by WHO on the basis of relatively weak evidence. Would we expect activities aimed at improving adherence to be generalizable across different settings? One might argue probably not. Adherence is a multifactorial, dynamic process and there is unlikely to be a ‘one size fits all’ approach to supporting adherence. In the absence of better evidence for any specific activity, we should perhaps focus on improving the quality of the basic package of adherence support offered to all people receiving ART, while also developing better ways to identify when certain people might benefit from enhanced support.        

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Moving from facility to community-based models of HIV care - will it work?

Community-based interventions to improve and sustain antiretroviral therapy adherence, retention in HIV care and clinical outcomes in low- and middle-income countries for achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets.

Nachega JB, Adetokunboh O, Uthman OA, Knowlton AW, Altice FL, Schechter M, Galarraga O, Geng E, Peltzer K, Chang LW, Van Cutsem G, Jaffar SS, Ford N, Mellins CA, Remien RH, Mills EJ. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2016 Oct;13(5):241-55. doi: 10.1007/s11904-016-0325-9.

Little is known about the effect of community versus health facility-based interventions to improve and sustain antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, virologic suppression, and retention in care among HIV-infected individuals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We systematically searched four electronic databases for all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative cohort studies in LMICs comparing community versus health facility-based interventions. Relative risks (RRs) for pre-defined adherence, treatment engagement (linkage and retention in care), and relevant clinical outcomes were pooled using random effect models. Eleven cohort studies and eleven RCTs (N = 97 657) were included. Meta-analysis of the included RCTs comparing community- versus health facility-based interventions found comparable outcomes in terms of ART adherence (RR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.99 to 1.04), virologic suppression (RR = 1.00, 95 % CI 0.98 to 1.03), and all-cause mortality (RR = 0.93, 95 % CI 0.73 to 1.18). The result of pooled analysis from the RCTs (RR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01 to 1.06) and cohort studies (RR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03 to 1.15) found that participants assigned to community-based interventions had statistically significantly higher rates of treatment engagement. Two studies found community-based ART delivery model either cost-saving or cost-effective. Community- versus facility-based models of ART delivery resulted in at least comparable outcomes for clinically stable HIV-infected patients on treatment in LMICs and are likely to be cost-effective.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: The remarkable global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes, while much-needed and impressive, has had inevitable consequences. These include overcrowding of health facilities, longer waiting times, reduced time for counselling and care of newly-enrolled people and restricted capacity to provide support for people who do not remain engaged with care. Furthermore, the UNAIDS 90-90-90 treatment target for 2020 to have 90% of people living with HIV know their HIV status, 90% of all diagnosed individuals receiving ART and 90% of people living with HIV on ART to be virally suppressed, will now require an additional 20 million people living with HIV to start treatment.

Community-based programmes to complement facility-based model of HIV care delivery are increasingly being recognised as an important and sustainable approach to address the growing numbers of people accessing care in high-HIV prevalence settings. This review compared outcomes of community-based versus facility-based models of ART delivery and treatment support. There was no statistical difference in optimal ART adherence, virologic suppression or all-cause mortality between participants assigned to community-based ART and facility-based ART in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). When data from RCTs and cohort studies were pooled, participants assigned to community-based ART appeared to have higher rates of retention in care at the end of the follow-up period. Notably, the few studies that did examine cost-effectiveness found community-based programmes to be cost-saving.

The findings demonstrate that community-level programmes are certainly not inferior to facility-based programmes. However, it is important to note some key limitations. Firstly, many of the studies are subject to selection bias, i.e. people at risk of poorer outcomes e.g. sicker people or people with a history of poor adherence may be excluded from receiving community-based programmes. The authors also highlight a high risk of “other forms of bias” in the cohort studies, but these are not specified. Secondly, adherence measures based on self-report may not be reliable. Thirdly, the review compared a heterogeneous set of programmes. Fourthly, as with other systematic reviews, publication bias is highly likely.   

Notwithstanding these limitations, this study suggests that community-based programmes have promise in supporting fragile and overcrowded facility-based healthcare systems in providing HIV care to a growing number of people. There may even be potential for integrating HIV care with care for other chronic conditions.

Well-designed studies are necessary, given the ambitious targets we have set ourselves, to explore the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community-based programmes. This is particularly important in under-represented groups with disproportionately poor outcomes such as children, adolescents and pregnant women. Further, for community-based programmes to be effective, it will be critical to ensure that adequate training and mentorship and ongoing monitoring for quality assurance is in place.      

Africa, Asia, Latin America
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Improving programmes: a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies of treatment adherence programmes

Barriers and facilitators of interventions for improving antiretroviral therapy adherence: a systematic review of global qualitative evidence.

Ma Q, Tso LS, Rich ZC, Hall BJ, Beanland R, Li H, Lackey M, Hu F, Cai W, Doherty M, Tucker JD. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Oct 17;19(1):21166. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.21166. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: Qualitative research on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions can provide a deeper understanding of intervention facilitators and barriers. This systematic review aims to synthesize qualitative evidence of interventions for improving ART adherence and to inform patient-centred policymaking.

Methods: We searched 19 databases to identify studies presenting primary qualitative data on the experiences, attitudes and acceptability of interventions to improve ART adherence among PLHIV and treatment providers. We used thematic synthesis to synthesize qualitative evidence and the CERQual (Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative Research) approach to assess the confidence of review findings.

Results: Of 2982 references identified, a total of 31 studies from 17 countries were included. Twelve studies were conducted in high-income countries, 13 in middle-income countries and six in low-income countries. Study populations focused on adults living with HIV (21 studies, n=1025), children living with HIV (two studies, n=46), adolescents living with HIV (four studies, n=70) and pregnant women living with HIV (one study, n=79). Twenty-three studies examined PLHIV perspectives and 13 studies examined healthcare provider perspectives. We identified six themes related to types of interventions, including task shifting, education, mobile phone text messaging, directly observed therapy, medical professional outreach and complex interventions. We also identified five cross-cutting themes, including strengthening social relationships, ensuring confidentiality, empowerment of PLHIV, compensation and integrating religious beliefs into interventions. Our qualitative evidence suggests that strengthening PLHIV social relationships, PLHIV empowerment and developing culturally appropriate interventions may facilitate adherence interventions. Our study indicates that potential barriers are inadequate training and compensation for lay health workers and inadvertent disclosure of serostatus by participating in the intervention.

Conclusions: Our study evaluated adherence interventions based on qualitative data from PLHIV and health providers. The study underlines the importance of incorporating social and cultural factors into the design and implementation of interventions. Further qualitative research is needed to evaluate ART adherence interventions.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: This is a review of studies using qualitative methods to explore the experiences of people living with HIV and healthcare providers involved in programmes to support antiretroviral treatment adherence. The thematic synthesis is presented in two ways. First, the reviewed studies are categorised by types of adherence programmes, such as task shifting, education, or directly observed therapy. Secondly, the authors present themes that are common across all reviewed studies. These include: the benefits and challenges of employing lay healthcare workers; the need to maintain confidentiality in adherence programmes; the benefits of supporting empowerment and social relationships for people living with HIV; and the need for culturally appropriate information and practice. Overall the review illustrates that adherence programmes can have more impact if they address confidentiality, strengthen social ties among people living with HIV and their communities; provide adequate compensation and training for lay healthcare workers; and sensitively reflect local social, cultural and religious norms and beliefs. 

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High mortality persists among people presenting with advanced HIV disease

Mortality in the first 3 months on antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults in low- and middle-income countries: a meta-analysis.

Brennan AT, Long L, Useem J, Garrison L, Fox MP. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016 Sep 1;73(1):1-10. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001112.

Previous meta-analyses reported mortality estimates of 12-month post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation; however, 40%-60% of deaths occur in the first 3 months on ART, a more sensitive measure of averted deaths through early ART initiation. To determine whether early mortality is dropping as treatment thresholds have increased, we reviewed studies of 3 months on ART initiation in low- to middle-income countries. Studies of 3-month mortality from January 2003 to April 2016 were searched in 5 databases. Articles were included that reported 3-month mortality from a low- to middle-income country; nontrial setting and participants were ≥15. We assessed overall mortality and stratified by year using random effects models. Among 58 included studies, although not significant, pooled estimates show a decline in mortality when comparing studies whose enrollment of patients ended before 2010 (7.0%; 95% CI: 6.0 to 8.0) with the studies during or after 2010 (4.0%; 95% CI: 3.0 to 5.0). To continue to reduce early HIV-related mortality at the population level, intensified efforts to increase demand for ART through active testing and facilitated referral should be a priority. Continued financial investments by multinational partners and the implementation of creative interventions to mitigate multidimensional complex barriers of accessing care and treatment for HIV are needed.

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Editor’s notes: Early mortality among people initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains high, presumed to be because many people living with HIV present when already very sick with advanced HIV disease. This systematic review included 43 studies from Africa and 13 from Asia. Its main aim was to see whether the evolution of guidelines recommending ART initiation at progressively higher CD4 counts over this period had reduced early mortality (defined as death within three months of ART start) and, by implication, the proportion of people starting ART who had advanced disease. To investigate this, the authors compared studies where enrolment ended before 2010 with studies that had started later.

Overall early mortality was six percent.  Because of the large numbers lost to follow up this will be an underestimate. The authors attempted to compensate for this, and calculated an adjusted overall figure of more than 10%. There was a fall in early mortality from seven percent to four percent (unadjusted) between the early and late periods but although the trend was consistent the difference was not significant.

In only four of the 58 studies was the median CD4 count at ART initiation above 200x106/l. It seems likely that even when policies to initiate ART at high CD4 counts are adopted, additional efforts will be necessary to promote initiation of ART and retention in care for people who feel well.  This is in order to reduce the number of people starting ART with advanced disease and consequently at very high risk of early death.   

Africa, Asia, Latin America
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