Articles tagged as "Latin America"

When to switch to second-line ART in children?

HIV-1 drug resistance and second-line treatment in children randomized to switch at low versus higher RNA thresholds.

Harrison L, Melvin A, Fiscus S, Saidi Y, Nastouli E, Harper L, Compagnucci A, Babiker A, McKinney R, Gibb D, Tudor-Williams G; PENPACT-1 (PENTA 9PACTG 390) Study Team. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Sep 1;70(1):42-53. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000671.

Background: The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold.

Methods: PENPACT-1 had a 2 x 2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based ART, and switch at a 1000 copies/mL versus 30 000 copies/mL threshold. Switch criteria were not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or Center for Disease Control and Prevention stage C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000 copies/mL before switch, resuppression, and at 4-years/trial end.

Results: Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000 copies/mL (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30 000 copies/mL (PI-30 000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000 copies/mL (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30 000 copies/mL (NNRTI-30 000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000 copies/mL switch criteria during 5-year follow-up. In 30 000 copies/mL threshold arms, median time from 1000 to 30 000 copies/mL switch criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P = 0.81). In NNRTI-30 000, more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000 copies/mL (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30 000). Sixty-two children started abacavir + lamivudine, 166 lamivudine + zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir + lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30 000, 64% NNRTI-1000, and 100% NNRTI-30 000 were <400 copies/mL 24 weeks later.

Conclusions: Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet resuppressed on second-line. An abacavir + lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Paediatric guidelines recommend that children living with HIV initiate ART early in life. Therefore duration of treatment is likely to be for several decades in children. Children have tended to be maintained on failing therapies longer than adults due to limited treatment options, particularly in resource-limited settings.

The PENPACT-1 trial compared two HIV viral load thresholds, <1000 and <30 000 copies/ml, for switching to second-line ART among children taking non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or protease inhibitor (PI)-based first-line regimens. As expected, children starting NNRTIs as their first-line regimen developed more NRTI mutations than children starting on boosted PIs. Importantly, children switching to second line ART at the higher viral load threshold were much more likely to develop resistance if they were taking NNRTI as their first line regimen than if they were taking boosted PIs. The study highlights the more “forgiving” nature of the PI drug class in terms of development of drug resistance. The main implication of this finding is that delayed switching on PI-based ART is a safe option in settings where future drug options are limited, as the risk of development of clinically significant PI or NRTI mutations is low. Interestingly, use of an abacavir + lamivudine nucleoside backbone resulted in fewer thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) than use of lamivudine + zidovudine or stavudine backbone. This finding was based on analysis of non-randomised data, but supports the current WHO recommendations to use abacavir as the first-line drug of choice in the NRTI backbone.

HIV Treatment
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Better integration of programmes against alcohol use necessary at every step of the HIV treatment cascade

The impact of alcohol use and related disorders on the HIV continuum of care: a systematic review: alcohol and the HIV continuum of care.

Vagenas P, Azar MM, Copenhaver MM, Springer SA, Molina PE, Altice FL. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2015 Sep 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Alcohol use is highly prevalent globally with numerous negative consequences to human health, including HIV progression, in people living with HIV (PLH). The HIV continuum of care, or treatment cascade, represents a sequence of targets for intervention that can result in viral suppression, which ultimately benefits individuals and society. The extent to which alcohol impacts each step in the cascade, however, has not been systematically examined. International targets for HIV treatment as prevention aim for 90% of PLH to be diagnosed, 90% of them to be prescribed with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90% to achieve viral suppression; currently, only 20% of PLH are virally suppressed. This systematic review, from 2010 through May 2015, found 53 clinical research papers examining the impact of alcohol use on each step of the HIV treatment cascade. These studies were mostly cross-sectional or cohort studies and from all income settings. Most (77 %) found a negative association between alcohol consumption on one or more stages of the treatment cascade. Lack of consistency in measurement, however, reduced the ability to draw consistent conclusions. Nonetheless, the strong negative correlations suggest that problematic alcohol consumption should be targeted, preferably using evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological interventions, to indirectly increase the proportion of PLH achieving viral suppression, to achieve treatment as prevention mandates, and to reduce HIV transmission.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: This systematic review examined the impact of alcohol consumption on each step of the HIV treatment cascade. This covered HIV diagnosis, linkage to care, retention in care, ART initiation and adherence, and sustained virologic suppression. Overall, there was an association between alcohol consumption and negative consequences on various steps of the treatment cascade. The majority of studies focused on the effect of alcohol use disorders and ART adherence, and on viral suppression. There was fairly consistent evidence of reduced adherence among people with alcohol use disorders. Key findings of this review include the lack of consistency in studies of alcohol consumption. Many studies are not using standardised, validated, measures such as the AUDIT, and there is the lack of studies on the association of alcohol use with earlier stages of the cascade, including testing uptake and linkage to care. Further studies in this area would be useful, to identify whether programmes focused on problematic alcohol use are necessary at HIV testing centres.

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HIV-associated stigma may impede HIV medication adherence among people living with HIV

The association of HIV-related stigma to HIV medication adherence: a systematic review and synthesis of the literature.

Sweeney SM, Vanable PA. AIDS Behav. 2015 Aug 25. [Epub ahead of print]

This paper provides a review of the quantitative literature on HIV-related stigma and medication adherence, including: (1) synthesis of the empirical evidence linking stigma to adherence, (2) examination of proposed causal mechanisms of the stigma and adherence relationship, and (3) methodological critique and guidance for future research. We reviewed 38 studies reporting either cross-sectional or prospective analyses of the association of HIV-related stigma to medication adherence since the introduction of antiretroviral therapies (ART). Although there is substantial empirical evidence linking stigma to adherence difficulties, few studies provided data on psychosocial mechanisms that may account for this relationship. Proposed mechanisms include: (a) enhanced vulnerability to mental health difficulties, (b) reduction in self-efficacy, and (c) concerns about inadvertent disclosure of HIV status. Future research should strive to assess the multiple domains of stigma, use standardized measures of adherence, and include prospective analyses to test mediating variables.

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Editor’s notes: People living with HIV often experience stigma and discrimination including social isolation and negative stereotyping. Recent evidence suggests that stigma may influence adherence to HIV medication among people living with HIV. This paper presents findings from a systematic review of the evidence on the impact of HIV-associated stigma on HIV medication adherence. The authors identified 38 studies which quantitatively assessed the association between stigma and medication adherence. All studies found evidence indicating that stigma contributed to adherence difficulties among people living with HIV. Included studies looked at diverse patient populations sampled from different countries and contexts. While stigma is heavily influenced by the socio-cultural context, the association between stigma and adherence across diverse contexts indicates that there may be commonalities in what causes stigma and how this relates to adherence.

The authors of this review suggest three possible causal mechanisms of HIV-associated stigma and medication adherence: (1) There may be links between stigma and depressive symptoms, and between depressive symptoms and adherence. Internalized stigma may enhance vulnerability to depressive symptoms, and this may influence adherence to HIV medication. (2) Stigma may cause reductions in self-efficacy – a person’s judgment of his or her ability to organize and execute behaviours - which may influence medication adherence. (3) People may fear HIV status disclosure by being seen taking HIV medication. Fear of status disclosure, and associated stigma, may cause people to avoid taking HIV medication.

The studies included in this review indicate a clear link between HIV-associated stigma and HIV medication adherence. There may be commonalities in what causes stigma across multiple populations. Future research should assess the influence of multiple forms of stigma on adherence, and on testing causal mechanisms between stigma and adherence. 

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START trial illustrates benefit of ART start with CD4>500

Initiation of antiretroviral therapy in early asymptomatic HIV infection.

Lundgren J, Babiker A,  Gordin F, Emery S, Grund B, Sharma S, Avihingsanon A, Cooper D, Fätkenheuer G, Llibre J, Molina J, Munderi P, Schechter M, Wood R, Klingman K, Collins S, Lane H, Phillips A,  Neaton J. INSIGHT START Study Group. N Engl J Med. 2015 Jul 20. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Data from randomized trials are lacking on the benefits and risks of initiating antiretroviral therapy in patients with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who have a CD4+ count of more than 350 cells per cubic millimeter.

Methods: We randomly assigned HIV-positive adults who had a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells per cubic millimeter to start antiretroviral therapy immediately (immediate-initiation group) or to defer it until the CD4+ count decreased to 350 cells per cubic millimeter or until the development of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or another condition that dictated the use of antiretroviral therapy (deferred-initiation group). The primary composite end point was any serious AIDS-related event, serious non-AIDS-related event, or death from any cause.

Results: A total of 4685 patients were followed for a mean of 3.0 years. At study entry, the median HIV viral load was 12 759 copies per milliliter, and the median CD4+ count was 651 cells per cubic millimeter. On May 15, 2015, on the basis of an interim analysis, the data and safety monitoring board determined that the study question had been answered and recommended that patients in the deferred-initiation group be offered antiretroviral therapy. The primary end point occurred in 42 patients in the immediate-initiation group (1.8%; 0.60 events per 100 person-years), as compared with 96 patients in the deferred-initiation group (4.1%; 1.38 events per 100 person-years), for a hazard ratio of 0.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.62; P<0.001). Hazard ratios for serious AIDS-related and serious non-AIDS-related events were 0.28 (95% CI, 0.15 to 0.50; P<0.001) and 0.61 (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.97; P=0.04), respectively. More than two thirds of the primary end points (68%) occurred in patients with a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells per cubic millimeter. The risks of a grade 4 event were similar in the two groups, as were the risks of unscheduled hospital admissions.

Conclusions: The initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive adults with a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells per cubic millimeter provided net benefits over starting such therapy in patients after the CD4+ count had declined to 350 cells per cubic millimeter.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Guidelines on when to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) are rapidly evolving. The major point of uncertainty, and disagreement between guidelines, has been whether the benefits to individuals of starting ART outweigh the risks for people with high CD4 counts, where the absolute risk of morbidity and mortality is relatively low.

The START study addressed this question among people with CD4 counts greater than 500 cells per µl. Study participants were recruited across the global regions, with the largest number from Europe (33%) followed by Latin America (25%) and Africa (21%). Some 55% were gay men and other men who have sex with men. Retention in the study was very good, and virologic outcomes among people who started ART were excellent (98% and 97% had virologic suppression by 12 months in the immediate versus deferred study arms). There was a 57% reduction in the hazard of the primary outcome, a composite of serious AIDS-associated events, serious non-AIDS associated events or death from any cause. The most common AIDS-associated events were tuberculosis (mostly seen in African participants), malignant lymphoma and Kaposi’s sarcoma. Among the serious non-AIDS events, cancers unrelated to AIDS were reduced by 50%, but interestingly there was no change in cardiovascular events. There was no increase in risk of serious adverse events. Interestingly the magnitude of risk reduction for the primary outcome was similar in high- and low-income countries.

These results will be very important as ART guidelines are reviewed and are likely to lead to recommendations for ART initiation, regardless of CD4 count in most settings. The authors note that, with a relatively low absolute risk of serious events, some people with high CD4 counts may opt to defer treatment, and this trial has produced very useful data to inform this discussion. Benefits from earlier ART initiation are dependent on earlier testing.  With an estimated 50% of people with HIV globally unaware of their status, the uptake of testing by asymptomatic people will need to be increased. In addition, retention in care will need to be optimised if the potential benefits of ART demonstrated by this study are to be realised.

HIV Treatment
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TAF: a new, safer version of tenofovir?

Tenofovir alafenamide versus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, coformulated with elvitegravir, cobicistat, and emtricitabine, for initial treatment of HIV-1 infection: two randomised, double-blind, phase 3, non-inferiority trials.

Sax PE, Wohl D, Yin MT, Post F, DeJesus E, Saag M, Pozniak A, Thompson M, Podzamczer D, Molina JM, Oka S, Koenig E, Trottier B, Andrade-Villanueva J, Crofoot G, Custodio JM, Plummer A, Zhong L, Cao H, Martin H, Callebaut C, Cheng AK, Fordyce MW, McCallister S, GS-US-292-0104/0111 Study Team. Lancet. 2015 Jun 27;385(9987):2606-15. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60616-X. Epub 2015 Apr 15.

Background: Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate can cause renal and bone toxic effects related to high plasma tenofovir concentrations. Tenofovir alafenamide is a novel tenofovir prodrug with a 90% reduction in plasma tenofovir concentrations. Tenofovir alafenamide-containing regimens can have improved renal and bone safety compared with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-containing regimens.

Methods: In these two controlled, double-blind phase 3 studies, we recruited treatment-naive HIV-infected patients with an estimated creatinine clearance of 50 mL per min or higher from 178 outpatient centres in 16 countries. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive once-daily oral tablets containing 150 mg elvitegravir, 150 mg cobicistat, 200 mg emtricitabine, and 10 mg tenofovir alafenamide (E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide) or 300 mg tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (E/C/F/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) with matching placebo. Randomisation was done by a computer-generated allocation sequence (block size 4) and was stratified by HIV-1 RNA, CD4 count, and region (USA or ex-USA). Investigators, patients, study staff, and those assessing outcomes were masked to treatment group. All participants who received one dose of study drug were included in the primary intention-to-treat efficacy and safety analyses. The main outcomes were the proportion of patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL at week 48 as defined by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) snapshot algorithm (pre-specified non-inferiority margin of 12%) and pre-specified renal and bone endpoints at 48 weeks. These studies are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, numbers NCT01780506 and NCT01797445.

Findings: We recruited patients from Jan 22, 2013, to Nov 4, 2013 (2175 screened and 1744 randomly assigned), and gave treatment to 1733 patients (866 given E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide and 867 given E/C/F/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate). E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide was non-inferior to E/C/F/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, with 800 (92%) of 866 patients in the tenofovir alafenamide group and 784 (90%) of 867 patients in the tenofovir disoproxil fumarate group having plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL (adjusted difference 2.0%, 95% CI -0.7 to 4.7). Patients given E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide had significantly smaller mean serum creatinine increases than those given E/C/F/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (0.08 vs 0.12 mg/dL; p<0.0001), significantly less proteinuria (median % change -3 vs 20; p<0.0001), and a significantly smaller decrease in bone mineral density at spine (mean % change -1.30 vs -2.86; p<0.0001) and hip (-0.66 vs -2.95; p<0.0001) at 48 weeks.

Interpretation: Through 48 weeks, more than 90% of patients given E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide or E/C/F/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate had virological success. Renal and bone effects were significantly reduced in patients given E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide. Although these studies do not have the power to assess clinical safety events such as renal failure and fractures, our data suggest that E/C/F/tenofovir alafenamide will have a favourable long-term renal and bone safety profile.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF) is a new antiretroviral agent developed by Gilead Sciences and is closely related to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF).  TDF is widely used, highly potent, and safe in the majority of people but long-term use has been associated with small risks of decreased kidney function, chronic kidney disease, and decreased bone mineral density.  Both TAF and TDF are prodrugs of tenofovir but TAF achieves highly potent concentrations of tenofovir inside HIV-relevant immune cells with much lower plasma concentrations than TDF.  The lower plasma concentration of tenofovir associated with TAF is hypothesised to reduce the toxic effects with regards to kidney and bone health. TAF is also effective at the lower dose of 10-25 mg, compared with the standard TDF dose of 300mg per day.  This may translate into lower drug costs if the lower dose required means lower manufacturing costs.

The authors report the combined results of two phase III, non-inferiority studies comparing the safety and effectiveness of TAF with TDF, funded by Gilead Sciences. In both studies, TAF was co-formulated into one, once-a-day tablet with elvitegravir, cobicistat and emtricitabine. There was a high rate of virologic suppression with the TAF-containing regimen, which was non-inferior to the TDF regimen. Compared to TDF, TAF had significantly more favourable effects on renal and bone parameters, with smaller decreases in creatinine clearance and bone mineral density and smaller increases in proteinuria. The real-world clinical significance of these findings remains to be seen but TAF-containing regimens may offer meaningful safety and cost benefits over TDF regimens in the long-term. The favourable characteristics of TAF have also led to the development of a sustained-release subcutaneous TAF implant, which has recently been evaluated in dogs. A long-acting TAF implant could have translational potential as a candidate for HIV prophylaxis in vulnerable populations.

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Tenofovir-based regimens improve outcomes in HIV-HBV co-infection

Comparison of HBV-active HAART regimens in an HIV-HBV multinational cohort: outcomes through 144 weeks.

Thio CL, Smeaton L, Hollabaugh K, Saulynas M, Hwang H, Saravanan S, Kulkarni S, Hakim J, Nyirenda M, Iqbal HS, Lalloo UG, Campbell TB, Lockman S, Currier JS. AIDS. 2015 Jun 19;29(10):1173-82. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000686.

Objectives: To explore factors associated with short and long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA suppression in a multinational cohort of HIV-HBV co-infected patients receiving HBV-active antiretrovirals.

Methods: One hundred and fifteen HIV-HBV co-infected patients participating in one of the two global randomized clinical trials conducted by the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group of different antiretroviral regimens received either HBV monotherapy with either lamivudine or emtricitabine (N = 56), or HBV dual therapy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine or emtricitabine (N = 59). Associations of pretreatment characteristics with the primary (HBV DNA <200 IU/ml at 24 weeks) and longitudinal outcomes through 144 weeks were explored using logistic regression. HBV drug-resistance mutations were determined by pol sequencing in those with viral rebound.

Results: The proportion with HBV DNA below 200 IU/ml was 60% (95% confidence interval 50-69%) at 24 weeks and 79% (95% confidence interval 69-88%) at 144 weeks. Pretreatment factors associated with the primary outcome were HBV DNA, CD4 T-cell count, and aspartate aminotransferase, but only pretreatment HBV DNA remained associated with long-term suppression (P < 0.0001). HBV therapy group was not significantly associated with the primary outcome at 24 weeks; however, longitudinally, a greater proportion in the dual-therapy group achieved HBV DNA below 200 IU/ml (P = 0.007). A higher proportion of hepatitis B e antigen-negative patients (n = 57) achieved HBV DNA below 200 IU/ml at any point, regardless of the therapy group. All 12 patients with emergence of lamivudine-resistant mutants were in the monotherapy group.

Conclusions: TDF-based dual HBV-active antiretroviral therapy is preferred to treat HIV-HBV co-infected patients. In resource-limited settings in which TDF may not be universally available, lamivudine or emtricitabine HBV monotherapy is a reasonable option in patients with low HBV replication.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Hepatitis B virus infection remains a leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality globally, through cirrhosis and liver cancer. In settings with a high prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection, there is an opportunity to optimise clinical management within the public health approach to antiretroviral therapy. This study adds to the evidence base suggesting that antiretroviral regimens containing lamivudine/emtricitabine and tenofovir are associated with better virologic outcomes than regimens without tenofovir for people co-infected with HIV and HBV. In this study, a post hoc analysis of two multicentre randomised controlled trials, regimens with two HBV-active agents provided more durable virologic suppression and limited the emergence of lamivudine-resistant HBV strains. Although recommendations about the treatment of HIV-HBV coinfection are incorporated into WHO antiretroviral guidelines, testing for HBV infection within antiretroviral programmes is still uncommon and tenofovir is not universally employed in standard first-line antiretroviral regimens. With an increasing number of people switching to second-line antiretroviral regimens, there is the additional challenge of identifying HBV infection in order to maintain HBV-active agents within the second-line regimen. There is now a need for better evidence around how to operationalise these recommendations within national antiretroviral programmes.        

Comorbidity, HIV Treatment
Africa, Asia, Latin America
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Men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of the evidence

Emerging themes for sensitivity training modules of African healthcare workers attending to men who have sex with men: a systematic review.

Dijkstra M, van der Elst EM, Micheni M, Gichuru E, Musyoki H, Duby Z, Lange JM, Graham SM, Sanders EJ. Int Health. 2015 May;7(3):151-162. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Sensitivity training of front-line African health care workers (HCWs) attending to men who have sex with men (MSM) is actively promoted through national HIV prevention programming in Kenya. Over 970 Kenyan-based HCWs have completed an eight-modular online training free of charge (http://www.marps-africa.org) since its creation in 2011. Before updating these modules, we performed a systematic review of published literature of MSM studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) in the period 2011-2014, to investigate if recent studies provided: important new knowledge currently not addressed in existing online modules; contested information of existing module topics; or added depth to topics covered already. We used learning objectives of the eight existing modules to categorise data from the literature. If data could not be categorised, new modules were suggested. Our review identified 142 MSM studies with data from sSA, including 34 studies requiring module updates, one study contesting current content, and 107 studies reinforcing existing module content. ART adherence and community engagement were identified as new modules. Recent MSM studies conducted in sSA provided new knowledge, contested existing information, and identified new areas of MSM service needs currently unaddressed in the online training.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Same sex practices remain criminalised in sub-Saharan Africa. Gay men and other men who have sex with men face stigma, discrimination, harassment and arrest. Health care workers frequently have no training on issues affecting gay men and other men who have sex with men and are ill-prepared to work sensitively with them. Together these can deter these men from accessing health care and HIV/STI services, increasing their risk of HIV and other poor health outcomes.

This study conducted a systematic review of gay men and other men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa. The findings were used to update an on-line training programme for health care workers in Kenya. This previously comprised modules on i) men who have sex with men and HIV in Africa ii) homophobia: stigma and its effects; iii) sexual identity, coming out and disclosure; iv) anal sex and common sexual practices; v) HIV and STIs; vi) condom and lubricant use; vii) mental health: anxiety, depression and substance use; and viii) risk-reduction counselling. The review updated the training programme with new evidence and two new modules were introduced: ix) ART adherence; and x) community engagement.

Health care workers play a crucial role in reducing stigma and discrimination facing gay men and other men who have sex with men. This systematic review provided a valuable step in updating an important, accessible training programme. Reducing homoprejudice and ensuring health care workers have accurate and up-to-date knowledge are key to improving service uptake by gay men and other men who have sex with men.

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Economic strengthening programmes for people living with HIV may increase their quality of life

The impact of social services interventions in developing countries: a review of the evidence of impact on clinical outcomes in people living with HIV.

Bateganya MH, Dong M, Oguntomilade J, Suraratdecha C. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Apr 15;68 Suppl 3:S357-67. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000498.

Background: Social service interventions have been implemented in many countries to help people living with HIV (PLHIV) and household members cope with economic burden as a result of reduced earning or increased spending on health care. However, the evidence for specific interventions-economic strengthening and legal services-on key health outcomes has not been appraised.

Methods: We searched electronic databases from January 1995 to May 2014 and reviewed relevant literature from resource-limited settings on the impact of social service interventions on mortality, morbidity, retention in HIV care, quality of life, and ongoing HIV transmission and their cost-effectiveness.

Results: Of 1685 citations, 8 articles reported the health impact of economic strengthening interventions among PLHIV in resource-limited settings. None reported on legal services. Six of the 8 studies were conducted in sub-Saharan Africa: 1 reported on all 5 outcomes and 2 reported on 4 and 2 outcomes, respectively. The remaining 5 reported on 1 outcome each. Seven studies reported on quality of life. Although all studies reported some association between economic strengthening interventions and HIV care outcomes, the quality of evidence was rated fair or poor because studies were of low research rigor (observational or qualitative), had small sample size, or had other limitations. The expected impact of economic strengthening interventions was rated as high for quality of life but uncertain for all the other outcomes.

Conclusions: Implementation of economic strengthening interventions is expected to have a high impact on the quality of life for PLHIV but uncertain impact on mortality, morbidity, retention in care, and HIV transmission. More rigorous research is needed to explore the impact of more targeted intervention components on health outcomes.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: To mitigate the impact of HIV on people living with HIV and their households, economic strengthening programmes and legal services have often been implemented. However, few have been rigorously evaluated in terms of their impact on HIV outcomes. This review of the literature reveals a limited and weak evidence base on the impact of such social services programmes for people living with HIV on mortality, morbidity, retention in HIV care, quality of life, and ongoing HIV transmission. It only identifies eight studies, all of them on economic strengthening activities, and most of them qualitative or observational in design. The authors conclude that the evidence suggests a high impact of such programmes on the quality of life for people living with HIV, which was consistently reported in the studies identified. Access to other confounding services, such as ART and broader community-based support, requires these findings to be interpreted with caution.     

The study clearly highlights the need for more rigorous impact and economic evaluations in this area. Indeed, the review did not identify any studies considering costs or cost-effectiveness. The authors also recommend more research into the feasibility and sustainability of these programmes, as well as greater focus of the implemented programmes on population groups in the greatest need.  

Africa, Asia, Latin America
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Can a simple risk score predict chronic kidney disease among people living with HIV?

Development and validation of a risk score for chronic kidney disease in HIV infection using prospective cohort data from the D:A:D study.

Mocroft A, Lundgren JD, Ross M, Law M, Reiss P, Kirk O, Smith C, Wentworth D, Neuhaus J, Fux CA, Moranne O, Morlat P, Johnson MA, Ryom L, D:A:D study group, the Royal Free Hospital Clinic Cohort, and the INSIGHT, SMART, and ESPRIT study groups. PLoS Med. 2015 Mar 31;12(3):e1001809. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001809. eCollection 2015.

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health issue for HIV-positive individuals, associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Development and implementation of a risk score model for CKD would allow comparison of the risks and benefits of adding potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals to a treatment regimen and would identify those at greatest risk of CKD. The aims of this study were to develop a simple, externally validated, and widely applicable long-term risk score model for CKD in HIV-positive individuals that can guide decision making in clinical practice.

Methods and findings: A total of 17 954 HIV-positive individuals from the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study with ≥3 estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values after 1 January 2004 were included. Baseline was defined as the first eGFR >60 ml/min/1.73 m2 after 1 January 2004; individuals with exposure to tenofovir, atazanavir, atazanavir/ritonavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, other boosted protease inhibitors before baseline were excluded. CKD was defined as confirmed (>3 mo apart) eGFR ≤60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Poisson regression was used to develop a risk score, externally validated on two independent cohorts. In the D:A:D study, 641 individuals developed CKD during 103 185 person-years of follow-up (PYFU; incidence 6.2/1000 PYFU, 95% CI 5.7-6.7; median follow-up 6.1 y, range 0.3-9.1 y). Older age, intravenous drug use, hepatitis C coinfection, lower baseline eGFR, female gender, lower CD4 count nadir, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) predicted CKD. The adjusted incidence rate ratios of these nine categorical variables were scaled and summed to create the risk score. The median risk score at baseline was -2 (interquartile range -4 to 2). There was a 1:393 chance of developing CKD in the next 5 y in the low risk group (risk score <0, 33 events), rising to 1:47 and 1:6 in the medium (risk score 0-4, 103 events) and high risk groups (risk score ≥5, 505 events), respectively. Number needed to harm (NNTH) at 5 y when starting unboosted atazanavir or lopinavir/ritonavir among those with a low risk score was 1702 (95% CI 1166-3367); NNTH was 202 (95% CI 159-278) and 21 (95% CI 19-23), respectively, for those with a medium and high risk score. NNTH was 739 (95% CI 506-1462), 88 (95% CI 69-121), and 9 (95% CI 8-10) for those with a low, medium, and high risk score, respectively, starting tenofovir, atazanavir/ritonavir, or another boosted protease inhibitor. The Royal Free Hospital Clinic Cohort included 2548 individuals, of whom 94 individuals developed CKD (3.7%) during 18 376 PYFU (median follow-up 7.4 y, range 0.3-12.7 y). Of 2013 individuals included from the SMART/ESPRIT control arms, 32 individuals developed CKD (1.6%) during 8452 PYFU (median follow-up 4.1 y, range 0.6-8.1 y). External validation showed that the risk score predicted well in these cohorts. Limitations of this study included limited data on race and no information on proteinuria.

Conclusions: Both traditional and HIV-related risk factors were predictive of CKD. These factors were used to develop a risk score for CKD in HIV infection, externally validated, that has direct clinical relevance for patients and clinicians to weigh the benefits of certain antiretrovirals against the risk of CKD and to identify those at greatest risk of CKD.

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Editor’s notes: The nephrotoxicity of antiretroviral drugs, particularly tenofovir, is of concern, particularly where there is limited access to laboratory monitoring of kidney function. The development of kidney impairment among people with HIV is associated with poor outcomes, and in low resource settings where dialysis is not available this can be catastrophic.

This study, like previous work, attempts to address this problem by developing a risk score for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The strength of this study is the availability of data for over 17 000 men and women living with HIV enrolled in cohort studies for many years, and in over 40 countries globally. The resulting risk score uses nine simple clinical variables which predict CKD both overall, and after starting potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals. A short risk score, not including cardiovascular risk factors, which may be more suitable for low resource settings, shows almost as good a prediction of CKD.

So will this risk score become widely used in clinical decision making? For high income countries this tool may be useful to identify people where strategies to prevent cardiovascular and renal disease are best focussed. It may also be useful to identify people at high risk of developing CKD for whom use of tenofovir may be unacceptable, especially when monitoring of kidney function is limited. However, few of the enrolled people were from low and middle income countries, and there was limited information on the race of participants. Therefore, the risk score may need to be validated in low resource settings before it can be widely used. Whether the use of the tool would help to improve clinical outcomes where kidney function is frequently monitored is unclear.

Meanwhile, a new drug formulation, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), is currently in clinical trials. This appears to be associated with less renal toxicity, and to be safe and well tolerated among adults with decreased kidney function. If future trial results support this evidence, and tenofovir alafenamide becomes widely available, concern about drug nephrotoxicity may become a less pressing clinical issue.

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Assessing risk behaviour and uptake of HIV care using an online network among MSM in Latin America

Engagement in HIV care and sexual transmission risk behavior among men who have sex with men using online social/sexual networking in Latin America.

Magidson JF, Biello KB, Safren SA, Rosenberger JG, Novak DS, Mayer KH, Mimiaga MJ. AIDS Care. 2015 Mar 4:1-8. [Epub ahead of print]

HIV/AIDS in Latin America is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, accurate estimates of engagement in HIV care in this population can be difficult to ascertain because many do not self-identify as MSM. Given evidence of decreased HIV transmissibility in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, identifying individuals not in care who are engaging in HIV transmission risk behavior is crucial for secondary prevention. Primary aims of this study were to examine engagement in care from testing to ART adherence among MSM using online social/sexual networking across Latin America, and whether individuals not in care at each step reported greater sexual transmission risk behavior than those in care. In the overall sample (n = 28 779), approximately 75% reported ever being tested for HIV, and 9% reported having received an HIV diagnosis. Among known HIV-infected individuals, 20% reported not being in care, 30% reported not taking ART, and 55% reported less than 100% ART adherence. Over one-third of HIV-infected individuals reported sexual HIV transmission risk behavior, defined as unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with a male partner of different/unknown HIV serostatus in the past three months. HIV-infected individuals not engaged in care more often reported UAI compared to those in care (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01-1.66). Although not statistically significant, HIV-infected individuals not on ART more often reported UAI compared to those on ART (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 0.94-1.47). Individuals who reported less than 100% ART adherence more often reported UAI compared to individuals with 100% adherence (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.26-1.90). Findings demonstrate that a substantial portion of HIV-infected MSM in Latin America who are likely not virologically suppressed from lack of ART use or adherence report sexual HIV transmission risk. Tailoring secondary HIV prevention for MSM in Latin America who are not in HIV care or adherent to ART may be warranted.

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Editor’s notes: The prevalence of HIV among gay men and other men who have sex with men in Latin America and the Caribbean is among the highest in the world. Stigma and discrimination towards gay men and other men who have sex with men  in these settings mean that many do not reveal their sexual preference, do not acknowledge their HIV risk, and do not access HIV diagnosis, care and treatment. This paper describes a large cross-sectional study of almost 30 000 gay men and other men who have sex with men from 17 countries in Latin America, recruited via a social/sexual networking website that they had recently used. The study highlights the substantial difficulty in fully engaging gay men and other men who have sex with men living with HIV, into treatment and care services in this region. This in turn contributes to high HIV prevalence and incidence, through unsafe sexual behaviour and unsuppressed viral load in gay men and other men who have sex with men living with HIV. The authors note that the highest proportion of participants receiving HIV care lived in Brazil, where national efforts have been made to reduce homophobia and to include gay men and other men who have sex with men in HIV prevention initiatives. Similar efforts are required in other Latin American countries if their high levels of HIV transmission in these communities, are to be reduced. This includes innovative methods such as using social networking sites as a platform for delivering programmes.  

Latin America
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