Articles tagged as "Latin America"

Feelings of regret after HIV status disclosure: prevalence, trends, and determinants

Was it a mistake to tell others that you are infected with HIV?: factors associated with regret following HIV disclosure among people living with HIV in five countries (Mali, Morocco, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador and Romania). Results from a community-based research.

Henry E, Bernier A, Lazar F, Matamba G, Loukid M, Bonifaz C, Diop S, Otis J, Préau M; The Partages study group. AIDS Behav. 2014 Dec 23. [Epub ahead of print]

This study examined regret following HIV serostatus disclosure and associated factors in under-investigated contexts (Mali, Morocco, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador and Romania). A community-based cross-sectional study was implemented by a mixed consortium [researchers/community-based organizations (CBO)]. Trained CBO members interviewed 1500 PLHIV in contact with CBOs using a 125-item questionnaire. A weighted multivariate logistic regression was performed. Among the 1212 participants included in the analysis, 290 (23.9 %) declared that disclosure was a mistake. Female gender, percentage of PLHIV's network knowing about one's seropositivity from a third party, having suffered rejection after disclosure, having suffered HIV-based discrimination at work, perceived seriousness of infection score, daily loneliness, property index and self-esteem score were independently associated with regret. Discrimination, as well as individual characteristics and skills may affect the disclosure experience. Interventions aiming at improving PLHIV skills and reducing their social isolation may facilitate the disclosure process and avoid negative consequences.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Anticipated and perceived consequences of disclosing one’s HIV status are recognized as important drivers for HIV disclosure. This community-based study looked at the experience of disclosing one’s HIV status, and the emotions that were associated with disclosure. The study was nested within a larger cross-sectional research project. 1500 people living with HIV (PLHIV) from Ecuador, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Mali, Romania, and Morocco were included in the study. Respondents were asked ‘Was it a mistake to tell others that you are infected with HIV?’ and to answer either ‘yes’ or ‘no.' Participants also responded to questions about the process of disclosure. Among people that had disclosed their status, some 23.9% said that it was a mistake to do so. Almost 40% of participants said that a person in their network learned about their status from a third party. More than 17% of participants responded that they faced rejection and eight percent of participants suffered discrimination at work following disclosure. But this varied greatly across countries. Factors associated with feeling regret after disclosing one’s status included being a female, perceived seriousness of HIV infection, and feeling lonely every day. This study highlights the fact that status disclosure can be emotional and stressful for people living with HIV. This suggests that people living with HIV must weigh the costs and benefits of disclosure before doing so and programmes that empower them to make informed decisions about disclosure may be beneficial. 

Africa, Europe, Latin America
  • share
0 comments.

Brazil - long-term protection from TB with six months of isoniazid preventive therapy

Long-term protection from isoniazid preventive therapy for tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a medium-burden tuberculosis setting: the TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study.

Golub JE, Cohn S, Saraceni V, Cavalcante SC, Pacheco AG, Moulton LH, Durovni B, Chaisson RE. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Nov 2. pii: ciu849. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: The duration of protection against tuberculosis provided by isoniazid preventive therapy is not known for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals living in settings of medium tuberculosis incidence.

Methods: We conducted an individual-level analysis of participants in a cluster-randomized, phased-implementation trial of isoniazid preventive therapy. HIV-infected patients who had positive tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) were followed until tuberculosis diagnosis, death, or administrative censoring. Nelson-Aalen cumulative hazard plots were generated and hazards were compared using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to investigate factors associated with tuberculosis diagnosis.

Results: Between 2003 and 2009, 1954 patients with a positive TST were studied. Among these, 1601 (82%) initiated isoniazid. Overall tuberculosis incidence was 1.39 per 100 person-years (PY); 0.53 per 100 PY in those who initiated isoniazid and 6.52 per 100 PY for those who did not (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], .11-.25). Receiving antiretroviral therapy at time of a positive TST was associated with a reduced risk of tuberculosis (aHR, 0.69; 95% CI, .48-1.00). Nelson-Aalen plots of tuberculosis incidence showed a constant risk, with no acceleration in 7 years of follow-up for those initiating isoniazid preventive therapy.

Conclusions: Isoniazid preventive therapy significantly reduced tuberculosis risk among HIV-infected patients with a positive TST. In a medium-prevalence setting, 6 months of isoniazid in HIV-infected patients with positive TST reduces tuberculosis risk over 7 years of follow-up, in contrast to results of studies in higher-burden settings in Africa.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is a key component of WHO strategy to reduce the burden of tuberculosis among people living with HIV. In early randomised trials among people living with HIV, the duration of IPT was usually six months. This was consistently found to be effective in reducing TB incidence among people with a positive tuberculin skin test (TST). However, more recent studies from southern Africa have found that this protective effect wanes rapidly after the IPT course is completed. These studies have led to policy recommendations for continuous IPT for people living with HIV who are TST positive. In addition, mathematical modelling of trial data has suggested that IPT may not “cure” latent TB infection in people living with HIV.

There are few data from settings with lower TB transmission documenting the durability of short-course IPT among people living with HIV. This paper reports long-term follow-up among people living with HIV who received IPT in the THRio study in Brazil, a medium TB burden setting. The data provides reassurance that a six-month course of IPT gives durable protection against TB among people living with HIV. Nonetheless, there is a need for implementation of shorter, effective TB preventive therapy regimens, which are less arduous for people and simpler for health services to deliver.

Avoid TB deaths
Comorbidity
Latin America
Brazil
  • share
0 comments.

High levels of suicide ideation among women living with HIV, with a history of gender violence

Women with HIV: gender violence and suicidal ideation

Ceccon RF, Meneghel SN, Hirakata VN. Rev Saude Publica. 2014 Oct;48(5):758-65.

Objective: To analyze the relationship between gender violence and suicidal ideation in women with HIV.

Methods: A cross-sectional study with 161 users of specialized HIV/AIDS care services. The study investigated the presence of gender violence through the Brazilian version of the World Health Organization Violence against Women instrument, and suicidal ideation through the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed with the SPSS software, using the Chi-square test and Poisson multiple regression model.

Results: Eighty-two women with HIV reported suicidal ideation (50.0%), 78 (95.0%) of whom had suffered gender violence. Age at first sexual intercourse < 15 years old, high number of children, poverty, living with HIV for long, and presence of violence were statistically associated with suicidal ideation. Women who suffered gender violence showed 5.7 times more risk of manifesting suicidal ideation.

Conclusions: Women with HIV showed a high prevalence to gender violence and suicidal ideation. Understanding the relationship between these two grievances may contribute to the comprehensive care of these women and implementation of actions to prevent violence and suicide.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The HIV epidemic in Brazil is becoming increasingly feminized. The male to female ratio of HIV infections has decreased from 26 to 1.5 men for every woman, over the past 10 years. Within the HIV field, there has been growing recognition of the mental health impacts of HIV infection, and the importance of considering how best to address this issue, as part of service provision. Similarly, there has been growing recognition within the violence field, that experiences of violence from a partner has both short and long term mental health impacts. Women who have violent partners may be at greater risk of contracting HIV, and be at risk of violence following disclosure. This paper illustrates the ways in which these issues cluster. The study finds that women living with HIV who had a history of violence are far more likely to report being HIV positive. The findings illustrate the need for HIV services to be able to both support women with mental health support needs, and support women who have a history of violence. The findings suggests that HIV counsellors need to be able to discuss issues of depression, suicidal ideation and violence, and potentially facilitate referral to specialized services in each area.

Latin America
Brazil
  • share
0 comments.

Why pregnant women and mothers living with HIV do not access, or do not stay in care

A systematic review of individual and contextual factors affecting ART initiation, adherence, and retention for HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women.

Hodgson I, Plummer ML, Konopka SN, Colvin CJ, Jonas E, Albertini J, Amzel A, Fogg KP. PLoS One. 2014 Nov 5;9(11):e111421. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0111421. eCollection 2014.

Background: Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women.

Methods: Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories.

Results: Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman's awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child's health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes.

Conclusions: To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in their own context that are described in this review. Further research on this population, including those who drop out of or never access health services, is needed to inform effective implementation.

Abstract Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: This systematic review is one of three by the same team, related to HIV and maternal mortality. The review findings illustrate that the individual and contextual factors which affect antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, adherence and retention for pregnant/postpartum women living with HIV are numerous. Fears over disclosure, and consequent stigma and discrimination feature in many of the studies reviewed. Practical barriers might be overcome, by making services more accessible. The lack of knowledge about HIV and treatment among some women may be addressed through information campaigns. However, the fear of negative consequences as a result of disclosure, even to health workers, presents significant barriers to care. This is something that is of particular note as Option B+ is rolled out. An important strength of this review is the combination of qualitative and quantitative studies. The meticulous description of the approach to the review is also welcome. The authors’ call for ‘consistent, standardised and appropriate measures of adherence and retention’ with a ‘longitudinal component’, is a valuable suggestion as the performance of countries in providing Option B+ begins to be compared.

  • share
0 comments.

Diagnosis of syphilis as an entry point for PrEP initiation among men who have sex with men

Syphilis predicts HIV incidence among men and transgender women who have sex with men in a preexposure prophylaxis trial.

Solomon MM, Mayer KH, Glidden DV, Liu AY, McMahan VM, Guanira JV, Chariyalertsak S, Fernandez T, Grant RM, iPrEx Study Team. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Oct;59(7):1020-6. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciu450. Epub 2014 Jun 13.

Background: Syphilis infection may potentiate transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to determine the extent to which HIV acquisition was associated with syphilis infection within an HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial and whether emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF) modified that association.

Methods: The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) study randomly assigned 2499 HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men (MSM) to receive oral daily FTC/TDF or placebo. Syphilis prevalence at screening and incidence during follow-up were measured. Hazard ratios for the effect of incident syphilis on HIV acquisition were calculated. The effect of FTC/TDF on incident syphilis and HIV acquisition was assessed.

Results: Of 2499 individuals, 360 (14.4%) had a positive rapid plasma reagin test at screening; 333 (92.5%) had a positive confirmatory test, which did not differ between the arms (FTC/TDF vs placebo, P = .81). The overall syphilis incidence during the trial was 7.3 cases per 100 person-years. There was no difference in syphilis incidence between the study arms (7.8 cases per 100 person-years for FTC/TDF vs 6.8 cases per 100 person-years for placebo, P = .304). HIV incidence varied by incident syphilis (2.8 cases per 100 person-years for no syphilis vs 8.0 cases per 100 person-years for incident syphilis), reflecting a hazard ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.6-4.4; P < .001). There was no evidence for interaction between randomization to the FTC/TDF arm and incident syphilis on HIV incidence.

Conclusions: In HIV-seronegative MSM, syphilis infection was associated with HIV acquisition in this PrEP trial; a syphilis diagnosis should prompt providers to offer PrEP unless otherwise contraindicated.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) trial and other recent trials have illustrated clearly that preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF) dramatically reduces the risk of HIV when used correctly and consistently. There is current discussion about the practical implications of these findings. This paper confirms a strong association between incident syphilis and HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM), and illustrates that syphilis did not attenuate the protective benefit of FTC/TDF against HIV. Syphilis continues to be prevalent among MSM in many settings, and the screening prevalence of 13% in this study is consistent with global estimates. These results highlight that individuals with syphilis are a key group for HIV acquisition. The results suggest that a new diagnosis of syphilis is an important opportunity for PrEP initiation, unless contraindications are present. This would be in addition to immediate syphilis treatment, and treatment for sexual partners. 

  • share
0 comments.

Does pregnancy accelerate HIV progression?

Pregnancy and HIV disease progression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Calvert C, Ronsmans C. Trop Med Int Health. 2014 Oct 31. doi: 10.1111/tmi.12412. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: To assess whether pregnancy accelerates HIV disease progression.

Methods: Studies comparing progression to HIV-related illness, low CD4 count, AIDS-defining illness, HIV-related death, or any death in HIV-infected pregnant and non-pregnant women were included. Relative risks (RR) for each outcome were combined using random effects meta-analysis and were stratified by antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability.

Results: 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pregnancy was not associated with progression to HIV-related illness [summary RR: 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-2.61], AIDS-defining illness (summary RR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.74-1.25) or mortality (summary RR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.62-1.53), but there was an association with low CD4 counts (summary RR: 1.41, 95%CI: 0.99-2.02) and HIV-related death (summary RR: 1.65, 95%CI: 1.06-2.57). In settings where ART was available, there was no evidence that pregnancy accelerated progress to HIV/AIDS-defining illnesses, death and drop in CD4 count. In settings without ART availability, effect estimates were consistent with pregnancy increasing the risk of progression to HIV/AIDS-defining illnesses and HIV-related or all-cause mortality, but there were too few studies to draw meaningful conclusions.

Conclusions: In the absence of ART, pregnancy is associated with small but appreciable increases in the risk of several negative HIV outcomes, but the evidence is too weak to draw firm conclusions. When ART is available, the effects of pregnancy on HIV disease progression are attenuated and there is little reason to discourage healthy HIV-infected women who desire to become pregnant from doing so.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The suppression of cell-mediated immunity during pregnancy is associated with increased susceptibility to and/or severity of many infections. Therefore the question of whether pregnancy accelerates HIV disease progression in HIV-positive women is pertinent. A previous systematic review published in the late 1990s found weak evidence that the odds of acquiring an AIDS-defining illness or death were higher among HIV-positive pregnant women than HIV-positive non-pregnant women. The findings from this meta-analysis also suggest that in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), pregnancy is associated with an increase in the risk of several negative HIV outcomes. Fortunately ART appears to diminish the effects of pregnancy on HIV progression.  The authors also draw attention to the methodological weaknesses of the studies included and highlight the need for better quality data, examining whether pregnancy aggravates HIV progression.

  • share
0 comments.

Low CD4 counts among alcohol-dependent people on antiretroviral therapy – not due to poor adherence

Alcohol dependence and CD4 cell count: is there a relationship?

Malbergier A, Amaral RA, Cardoso LD. AIDS Care. 2014 Sep 1:1-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Alcohol and other drugs use seem to be common among people infected with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Their effects on HIV progression is still in debate. This study aimed to assess the association between alcohol and drug use and an HIV disease progression biomarker (CD4 cell count) among patients on ART. A cross-sectional study was carried out at an HIV treatment center affiliated with Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Four hundred and thirty-eight HIV-positive patients on ART were interviewed by trained psychiatrists and psychologists using the following instruments: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire (SMAQ). In the previous month, 219 (50%) and 41 (9.3%) patients reported use of alcohol and illicit drugs, respectively. Fifty patients (12.6%) were classified as having harmful alcohol use by AUDIT. According to SCID-I, 80 patients (18.3%) were alcohol abusers, 24 (5.5%) alcohol dependents, and 21 (4.2%) had a current depressive disorder. Almost 73% (n = 319-72.8%) of the patients were adherent to ART. Alcohol dependents were nine times (p < 0.01) more likely to have CD4 cell count ≤200/mm3, and this association was independent of ART adherence. In conclusion, alcohol dependence seems to be associated with low CD4 cell count in HIV-positive patients. Based on these data, HIV health care workers should always assess alcohol consumption in the treatment setting, and patients should be advised that alcohol dependence may be linked to low CD4.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: The prognosis for people living with HIV who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) depends not only on their adherence to ART, but also the presence of co-morbid health conditions. There is now increasing focus on the role mental health disorders have on HIV-related outcomes. In this study of 438 HIV positive people on ART in Brazil, nearly 20% of individuals were found to be abusing alcohol, and five percent were diagnosed as being alcohol dependent. The people who were alcohol dependent were nine times more likely to have CD4 count <200/mm3, an association which was independent of ART adherence, HIV viral load and illicit substance use. As the availability of mental health care in low- and middle-income countries continues to expand, people living with HIV will comprise a key population for these services. Future research must confirm whether the relationship between alcohol dependence and CD4 count persists over time, and how alcohol dependence services can be integrated with HIV care services.

Latin America
Brazil
  • share
1 comments.

Counting and classifying global deaths

Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

Murray CJ, Ortblad KF, Guinovart C, et al. Lancet. 2014 Sep 13;384(9947):1005-70. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60844-8. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Background: The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach to disease estimation for between 1990 and 2013, and an opportunity to assess whether accelerated progress has occurred since the Millennium Declaration.

Methods: To estimate incidence and mortality for HIV, we used the UNAIDS Spectrum model appropriately modified based on a systematic review of available studies of mortality with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). For concentrated epidemics, we calibrated Spectrum models to fit vital registration data corrected for misclassification of HIV deaths. In generalised epidemics, we minimised a loss function to select epidemic curves most consistent with prevalence data and demographic data for all-cause mortality. We analysed counterfactual scenarios for HIV to assess years of life saved through prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and ART. For tuberculosis, we analysed vital registration and verbal autopsy data to estimate mortality using cause of death ensemble modelling. We analysed data for corrected case-notifications, expert opinions on the case-detection rate, prevalence surveys, and estimated cause-specific mortality using Bayesian meta-regression to generate consistent trends in all parameters. We analysed malaria mortality and incidence using an updated cause of death database, a systematic analysis of verbal autopsy validation studies for malaria, and recent studies (2010-13) of incidence, drug resistance, and coverage of insecticide-treated bednets.

Findings: Globally in 2013, there were 1.8 million new HIV infections (95% uncertainty interval 1.7 million to 2.1 million), 29.2 million prevalent HIV cases (28.1 to 31.7), and 1.3 million HIV deaths (1.3 to 1.5). At the peak of the epidemic in 2005, HIV caused 1.7 million deaths (1.6 million to 1.9 million). Concentrated epidemics in Latin America and eastern Europe are substantially smaller than previously estimated. Through interventions including PMTCT and ART, 19.1 million life-years (16.6 million to 21.5 million) have been saved, 70.3% (65.4 to 76.1) in developing countries. From 2000 to 2011, the ratio of development assistance for health for HIV to years of life saved through intervention was US$ 4498 in developing countries. Including in HIV-positive individuals, all-form tuberculosis incidence was 7.5 million (7.4 million to 7.7 million), prevalence was 11.9 million (11.6 million to 12.2 million), and number of deaths was 1.4 million (1.3 million to 1.5 million) in 2013. In the same year and in only individuals who were HIV-negative, all-form tuberculosis incidence was 7.1 million (6.9 million to 7.3 million), prevalence was 11.2 million (10.8 million to 11.6 million), and number of deaths was 1.3 million (1.2 million to 1.4 million). Annualised rates of change (ARC) for incidence, prevalence, and death became negative after 2000. Tuberculosis in HIV-negative individuals disproportionately occurs in men and boys (versus women and girls); 64.0% of cases (63.6 to 64.3) and 64.7% of deaths (60.8 to 70.3). Globally, malaria cases and deaths grew rapidly from 1990 reaching a peak of 232 million cases (143 million to 387 million) in 2003 and 1.2 million deaths (1.1 million to 1.4 million) in 2004. Since 2004, child deaths from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa have decreased by 31.5% (15.7 to 44.1). Outside of Africa, malaria mortality has been steadily decreasing since 1990.

Interpretation: Our estimates of the number of people living with HIV are 18.7% smaller than UNAIDS's estimates in 2012. The number of people living with malaria is larger than estimated by WHO. The number of people living with HIV, tuberculosis, or malaria have all decreased since 2000. At the global level, upward trends for malaria and HIV deaths have been reversed and declines in tuberculosis deaths have accelerated. 101 countries (74 of which are developing) still have increasing HIV incidence. Substantial progress since the Millennium Declaration is an encouraging sign of the effect of global action.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study uses standard methods to compare and track over time national distributions of deaths by cause, and the prevalence of disease and disability.  This detailed report focuses on HIV, TB and Malaria. It presents regional summaries of incidence, prevalence and mortality rates, and national estimates of the number of male and female deaths and new infections. Point estimates are shown for 2013, and annualised rates of change for 1990-2000 and 2000-2013. These highlight the contrasting trends in disease impact before and after the formulation of the Millennium Development Goal to combat these diseases.  The global peak of HIV mortality occurred in 2005, but regional annualised rates of change for 2000-2013 indicate that HIV deaths are still increasing significantly in east Asia, southern Africa, and most rapidly in eastern Europe.

The GBD 2013 global estimates of new infections and deaths agree closely with the corresponding estimates made by UNAIDS. But there are significant differences in the respective estimates of the number of people currently living with HIV (UNAIDS estimates are some 18% higher), and historical trends in AIDS deaths, with UNAIDS judging that the recent fall has been steeper. These differences are attributed primarily to methods used in the GBD study to ensure that the sum of deaths from specific causes fits the estimated all cause total, and to varying assumptions about historical survival patterns following HIV infection. 

It may be worthwhile to look at a comment by Michel Sidibé, Mark Dybul, and Deborah Birx in the Lancet on MDG 6 and beyond: from halting and reversing AIDS to ending the epidemic which refers to this study.

Epidemiology
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palestinian Territory, Occupied, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe
  • share
0 comments.

More data needed from routine programme data on antiretroviral therapy cascade outcomes among female sex workers

Antiretroviral therapy uptake, attrition, adherence and outcomes among HIV-infected female sex workers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Mountain E, Mishra S, Vickerman P, Pickles M, Gilks C, Boily MC. PLoS One. 2014 Sep 29;9(9):e105645. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105645. eCollection 2014.

Purpose: We aimed to characterize the antiretroviral therapy (ART) cascade among female sex workers (FSWs) globally.

Methods: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE in March 2014 to identify studies reporting on ART uptake, attrition, adherence, and outcomes (viral suppression or CD4 count improvements) among HIV-infected FSWs globally. When possible, available estimates were pooled using random effects meta-analyses (with heterogeneity assessed using Cochran's Q test and I2 statistic).

Results: 39 studies, reporting on 21 different FSW study populations in Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Central America and the Caribbean, were included. Current ART use among HIV-infected FSWs was 38% (95% CI: 29%-48%, I2 = 96%, 15 studies), and estimates were similar between high-, and low- and middle-income countries. Ever ART use among HIV-infected FSWs was greater in high-income countries (80%; 95% CI: 48%-94%, I2 = 70%, 2 studies) compared to low- and middle-income countries (36%; 95% CI: 7%-81%, I2 = 99%, 3 studies). Loss to follow-up after ART initiation was 6% (95% CI: 3%-11%, I2 = 0%, 3 studies) and death after ART initiation was 6% (95% CI: 3%-11%, I2 = 0%, 3 studies). The fraction adherent to ≥95% of prescribed pills was 76% (95% CI: 68%-83%, I2 = 36%, 4 studies), and 57% (95% CI: 46%-68%, I2 = 82%, 4 studies) of FSWs on ART were virally suppressed. Median gains in CD4 count after 6 to 36 months on ART, ranged between 103 and 241 cells/mm3 (4 studies).

Conclusions: Despite global increases in ART coverage, there is a concerning lack of published data on HIV treatment for FSWs. Available data suggest that FSWs can achieve levels of ART uptake, retention, adherence, and treatment response comparable to that seen among women in the general population, but these data are from only a few research settings. More routine programme data on HIV treatment among FSWs across settings should be collected and disseminated.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Female sex workers remain a key population for HIV prevention, treatment and care. This is the first paper to systematically review and quantify the HIV treatment cascade among sex workers globally. The review highlights the scarcity of published data on HIV treatment among sex workers. For example, data were identified from only five countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Benin, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Rwanda and Zimbabwe) and a lack of data from routine (non research) settings. Further, most studies presented data on current antiretroviral therapy (ART) or CD4 count at initiation rather than follow-up data on attrition, adherence or viral suppression. The results suggest that research cohorts have been largely successful at enrolling and retaining female sex workers on ART, but there may be an issue with adherence. Adherence, in the few studies where it was measured (usually by self-report or pill counts) was high, and similar to estimates from the general population. But just over half of the participants initiating ART achieved viral suppression in the four studies which looked at this. This indicates scope for improvements in adherence (and adherence measurement) in these populations. This is possibly due to individual-level and structural-level barriers that sex workers face when receiving HIV treatment and care

  • share
0 comments.

Model estimates large global burden of childhood tuberculosis infection and potentially preventable future tuberculosis disease

Burden of childhood tuberculosis in 22 high-burden countries: a mathematical modelling study.

Dodd PJ, Gardiner E, Coghlan R, Seddon JA. Lancet Glob Health. 2014 Aug;2(8):e453-9. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(14)70245-1. Epub 2014 Jul 8.

Background: Confirmation of a diagnosis of tuberculosis in children (aged <15 years) is challenging; under-reporting can result even when children do present to health services. Direct incidence estimates are unavailable, and WHO estimates build on paediatric notifications, with adjustment for incomplete surveillance by the same factor as adult notifications. We aimed to estimate the incidence of infection and disease in children, the prevalence of infection, and household exposure in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease.

Methods: Within a mechanistic mathematical model, we combined estimates of adult tuberculosis prevalence in 2010, with aspects of the natural history of paediatric tuberculosis. In a household model, we estimated household exposure and infection. We accounted for the effects of age, BCG vaccination, and HIV infection. Additionally, we tested sensitivity to key structural assumptions by repeating all analyses without variation in BCG efficacy by latitude.

Findings: The median number of children estimated to be sharing a household with an individual with infectious tuberculosis in 2010 was 15 319 701 (IQR 13 766 297-17 061 821). In 2010, the median number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in children was 7 591 759 (5 800 053-9 969 780), and 650 977 children (424 871-983 118) developed disease. Cumulative exposure meant that the median number of children with latent infection in 2010 was 53 234 854 (41 111 669-68 959 804). The model suggests that 35% (23-54) of paediatric cases of tuberculosis in the 15 countries reporting notifications by age in 2010 were detected. India is predicted to account for 27% (22-33) of the total burden of paediatric tuberculosis in the 22 countries. The predicted proportion of tuberculosis burden in children for each country correlated with incidence, varying between 4% and 21%.

Interpretation: Our model has shown that the incidence of paediatric tuberculosis is higher than the number of notifications, particularly in young children. Estimates of current household exposure and cumulative infection suggest an enormous opportunity for preventive treatment.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Estimating the burden of childhood tuberculosis has been largely neglected until recently. Children with tuberculosis rarely transmit and therefore from a control perspective, childhood tuberculosis does not notably contribute to the continuation of the tuberculosis epidemic. This modelling paper attempts to estimate the global burden of childhood tuberculosis infection and disease. Incidence estimates are made by using adult tuberculosis prevalence data to tackle the known limitations of using paediatric notification data. A second model estimates the prevalence of infection in children and household exposure, ignoring exposure outside of the household.  As with all mathematical model predictions, precision of estimates are dependent on the data used as inputs in the model. Despite these limitations, the paper draws attention to the fact that the burden of childhood tuberculosis infection and disease is significant and reflects failure of tuberculosis control in the 22 high-burden countries. The paper also highlights the fact that household contact tracing and preventive therapy in tuberculosis-exposed children could substantially reduce future tuberculosis-related morbidity.

Avoid TB deaths
Comorbidity, Epidemiology
Africa, Asia, Latin America
  • share
0 comments.