Articles tagged as "United Kingdom"

Despite better access to HIV treatment we need stronger evidence based guidance on treating people with serious complications of advanced HIV infection

Editor’s notes: The emphasis for scaling up HIV treatment usually focuses on outpatient and primary care clinics with increasing decentralization to the community.  It is therefore sobering to see the results of a randomized trial conducted at a national referral hospital in Zambia.  Andrews and colleagues report on 209 adults admitted to hospital with sepsis and hypotension, a combination referred to as septic shock.  Several important points emerge.  Almost 90% of patients admitted with this serious condition were HIV-positive.  Most had only been diagnosed with HIV infection in the last three months, and approximately half were taking ART.  The median CD4 count was only 70 cells per microlitre. Almost half had a history of having tuberculosis and one quarter were currently on anti-tuberculosis treatment at the time of admission to hospital. Most were also anaemic, with an average haemoglobin of 7.8 g/dl. Mortality from septic shock has been falling in Europe and the United States of America largely due to more intensive management of intravenous fluids and blood pressure.  The focus has been on strict protocols to ensure that all patients get the best treatment. However, there has been debate about the best approach to take when less sophisticated monitoring and supportive technology such as artificial ventilation is not available. In this Zambian tertiary hospital setting, only one patient was able to be managed in the intensive care unit due to resource constraints.  Patients were randomized to receive a protocolized intensive fluid and blood pressure resuscitation or to receive the more standard care with the responsible physicians making the decisions.  The death rate from this severe condition was very high.  85 of the 209 patients randomized died.  However, despite receiving more intravenous fluids, more blood transfusions and more drugs to raise blood pressure, the outcomes were worse in the group treated according to the protocol with 48% mortality compared to 33% in the standard care arm.  As always, the lesson is that many of these deaths could have been avoided if we were able to diagnose, link and treat people living with HIV much earlier in the course of their infection.  However, there is also an important caution that treatments that make good sense and seem the best course of action may in fact make the situation worse, even if the same treatments have been shown in other contexts to be beneficial.  Such information will only come from randomized trials, and the authors should be congratulated for being bold enough to conduct a high-quality study that should make us reflect on our preconceptions about how best to treat seriously ill patients in resource poor settings.

Andrade and colleagues have reviewed the literature in order to determine the best approach to treating critically unwell people living with HIV who are admitted to intensive care units.  They examined whether starting ARVs while the person was already critically ill was associated with better outcomes.  Patients in intensive care may already have many different medicines, as well as altered metabolism.  In addition, ARVs can provoke immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes that have been shown to make outcomes worse in some serious conditions such as cryptococcal meningitis.  On the other hand, the evidence from patients with tuberculosis is clear – starting ARVs as soon as possible is associated with better outcomes.  In this review and meta-analysis, there was a clear short-term advantage to starting ARVs while the patient was still in intensive care.  The data were not sufficient to tell whether the longer-term outcome as also improved by the earlier start of ART.  One limitation is that all the studies reviewed were observational, and the decision to start ARVs was not randomized, so that it is plausible that clinicians may have started ARVs more willingly in those patients who were most likely to survive.  Nonetheless, in the absence of randomized trials, this study makes a strong case for starting ARVs promptly even in the sickest patients.

Effect of an early resuscitation protocol on in-hospital mortality among adults with sepsis and hypotension: a randomized clinical trial.

Andrews B, Semler MW, Muchemwa L, Kelly P, Lakhi S, Heimburger DC, Mabula C, Bwalya M, Bernard GR. JAMA. 2017 Oct 3;318(13):1233-1240. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.10913.

Importance: The effect of an early resuscitation protocol on sepsis outcomes in developing countries remains unknown.

Objective: To determine whether an early resuscitation protocol with administration of intravenous fluids, vasopressors, and blood transfusion decreases mortality among Zambian adults with sepsis and hypotension compared with usual care.

Design, setting, and participants: Randomized clinical trial of 212 adults with sepsis (suspected infection plus ≥2 systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria) and hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg or mean arterial pressure ≤65 mm Hg) presenting to the emergency department at a 1500-bed referral hospital in Zambia between October 22, 2012, and November 11, 2013. Data collection concluded December 9, 2013.

Interventions: Patients were randomized 1:1 to either (1) an early resuscitation protocol for sepsis (n = 107) that included intravenous fluid bolus administration with monitoring of jugular venous pressure, respiratory rate, and arterial oxygen saturation and treatment with vasopressors targeting mean arterial pressure (≥65 mm Hg) and blood transfusion (for patients with a hemoglobin level <7 g/dL) or (2) usual care (n = 105) in which treating clinicians determined hemodynamic management.

Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and the secondary outcomes included the volume of intravenous fluid received and receipt of vasopressors.

Results: Among 212 patients randomized to receive either the sepsis protocol or usual care, 3 were ineligible and the remaining 209 completed the study and were included in the analysis (mean [SD] age, 36.7 [12.4] years; 117 men [56.0%]; 187 [89.5%] positive for the human immunodeficiency virus). The primary outcome of in-hospital mortality occurred in 51 of 106 patients (48.1%) in the sepsis protocol group compared with 34 of 103 patients (33.0%) in the usual care group (between-group difference, 15.1% [95% CI, 2.0%-28.3%]; relative risk, 1.46 [95% CI, 1.04-2.05]; P = .03). In the 6 hours after presentation to the emergency department, patients in the sepsis protocol group received a median of 3.5 L (interquartile range, 2.7-4.0 L) of intravenous fluid compared with 2.0 L (interquartile range, 1.0-2.5 L) in the usual care group (mean difference, 1.2 L [95% CI, 1.0-1.5 L]; P < .001). Fifteen patients (14.2%) in the sepsis protocol group and 2 patients (1.9%) in the usual care group received vasopressors (between-group difference, 12.3% [95% CI, 5.1%-19.4%]; P < .001).

Conclusions and relevance: Among adults with sepsis and hypotension, most of whom were positive for HIV, in a resource-limited setting, a protocol for early resuscitation with administration of intravenous fluids and vasopressors increased in-hospital mortality compared with usual care. Further studies are needed to understand the effects of administration of intravenous fluid boluses and vasopressors in patients with sepsis across different low- and middle-income clinical settings and patient populations.

Abstract access

Highly active antiretroviral therapy for critically ill HIV patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Andrade HB, Shinotsuka CR, da Silva IRF, Donini CS, Yeh Li H, de Carvalho FB, Americano do Brasil PEA, Bozza FA, Miguel Japiassu A. PLoS One. 2017 Oct 24;12(10):e0186968. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0186968. eCollection 2017

Introduction: It is unclear whether the treatment of an HIV infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) affects intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis performed to summarize the effects of HAART on the prognosis of critically ill HIV positive patients.

Materials and methods: A bibliographic search was performed in 3 databases (PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus) to identify articles that investigated the use of HAART during ICU admissions for short- and long-term mortality or survival. Eligible articles were selected in a staged process and were independently assessed by two investigators. The methodological quality of the selected articles was evaluated using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) tool.

Results: Twelve articles met the systematic review inclusion criteria and examined short-term mortality. Six of them also examined long-term mortality (≥90 days) after ICU discharge. The short-term mortality meta-analysis showed a significant beneficial effect of initiating or maintaining HAART during the ICU stay (random effects odds ratio 0.53, p = 0.02). The data analysis of long-term outcomes also suggested a reduced mortality when HAART was used, but the effect of HAART on long-term mortality of HIV positive critically ill patients remains uncertain.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests improved survival rates for HIV positive patients who were treated with HAART during their ICU admission.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

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Health economics of PrEP in Europe

Editor’s notes: One of the most common questions for policy makers considering the introduction of PrEP is how much it will cost and whether the benefits will outweigh the costs.  The answers to these questions will be dependent on the specific context but will be strongly influenced by four factors: the cost of PrEP (including its delivery); the savings due to reduced costs of HIV care; the effectiveness of PrEP; and the incidence of HIV in the population who receive PrEP.  The effectiveness and the incidence can be combined to calculate the number needed to treat to prevent an HIV infection.  As mentioned above, both PROUD and Ipergay demonstrated excellent effectiveness in populations that were highly at risk, as shown by the very high incidence in the placebo or deferred arms of these studies.  Durand-Zaleski and colleagues present their analysis of the costs and benefits of PrEP as used in the Ipergay study.  Most participants were in France, where lifetime costs of HIV treatment are estimated to be more than 500 000 euros.  At the time of Ipergay, the medicines for PrEP cost more than 500 euros monthly, but subsequently generic medicines have become available in France for around 180 euros monthly, and the price in France is approximately US$60 per month from Indian suppliers over the internet. When other health related costs are included, the costs to prevent an HIV infection vary from 27 000 to 75 000 euros depending on the costs of the medicines.  The confidence intervals around these estimates are wide because the trial was stopped before there were too many infections given the clear evidence of efficacy.  This model does not discount future costs, as it uses a short time horizon.  The model also does not consider ongoing transmission, which the authors estimate to be around two to three additional people given data from Ipergay’s sexual mixing data.  So, the conclusions that the benefits of PrEP outweigh the costs are based on conservative assumptions for this population.  However, it is important to recognize that the study population had an HIV incidence of 6.6 per 100 person-years and the incidence was more than nine per 100 person-years in the participants recruited into the placebo arm in the two Paris sites.  This led to an estimated number needed to treat of around 18 overall and around 13 for the Parisian sites.  WHO recommends that PrEP is offered to all people at significant risk of HIV infection, in whom the incidence might be more than three per 100 person-years.  An incidence of 3% would more than double the costs per infection averted calculated in this study, and an incidence of 0.66% (which would still represent an important and ongoing HIV epidemic, such as that seen on average in recent PHIA studies in Zambia and twice that seen in Malawi) would increase the costs per infection averted by tenfold.  From a health economic perspective, PrEP should always be prioritized to people who are most at risk.  From a human rights perspective, PrEP should be offered to anyone who wants it and in whom the epidemiological and psychological benefits outweigh the very small clinical risks of taking tenofovir and emtricitabine.

Cambiano and colleagues have modelled the potential impact and costs of PrEP in the UK population of gay men and men who have sex with men.  They assumed that PrEP would be offered to HIV-negative men who reported condomless anal sex in the past three months. Over the next 80 years, HIV infections would be prevented both directly and because of ongoing transmission to other men, leading to considerable cost-savings in terms of health care costs.  Overall, the authors predict that such a PrEP programme might save one billion pounds and avert approximately 25% of the HIV infections that would have been seen in the absence of the programme.  The results included a wide range of probabilistic uncertainty sampling.  The largest changes to their estimates would come from reductions in the costs of ARVs (for both treatment and for PrEP).  If PrEP was considerably cheaper, the time to break even in costs terms would be shorter.  On the one hand, we need models with a long-time horizon to capture all the benefits of preventing HIV infection today.  On the other hand, changes in technologies that may arise in the future cannot be incorporated into such models despite our hope that HIV prevention and treatment is likely to be very different over the next decades.

Costs and benefits of on-demand HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis in MSM.

Durand-Zaleski I, Mutuon P, Charreau I, Tremblay C, Rojas D, Pialoux G, Chidiac C, Capitant C, Spire B, Cotte L, Chas J, Meyer L; Molina JM for the ANRS IPERGAY study group. AIDS. 32(1):95–102, 2018 Jan 2. doi:10.1097/QAD.0000000000001658. [Epub 2017 Oct 12]

Objectives: We undertook the economic evaluation of the double-blind randomized ANRS-IPERGAY trial, which showed the efficacy of on-demand preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-emtricitabine (FTC) in preventing HIV infection among high-risk MSM.

Design and methods: The economic evaluation was prospective. Counseling, drugs (TDF-FTC at €500.88 for 30 tablets), tests, visits, and hospital admissions were valued based on in-trial use. The cost of on-demand PrEP/HIV infection averted was compared with the yearly and lifetime costs of HIV infection in France in a cost and benefits analysis.

Results: The yearly number of participants needed to treat to prevent one HIV infection was 17.6 (95% confidence interval = 10.7–49.9). The annual cost of counseling was €690/participant. The total 1-year costs of PrEP were €4271/participant, of which €3129 (73%) were drug costs corresponding to 15 tablets of TDF-FTC/month. The yearly cost of on-demand PrEP to avoid one infection was €75  258. Using TDF-FTC generic (€179.9/30 tablets) reduced the 1-year costs of on-demand PrEP to €2271/participant and €39  970/infection averted, respectively. Using TDF-FTC at international market discounted prices (€60/30 tablets) reduced the costs to €1517/participant and the cost to €26  787/infection averted, comparable with the yearly treatment cost of HIV infection in France. On-demand PrEP was found to be cost saving in France if the duration of exposure was less than 7.5 years at current drug price and 13 years at generic price.

Conclusion: On-demand PrEP in high-risk MSM with TDF-FTC can be considered cost saving. Other benefits include the treatments of other diseases and reductions in secondary infections.

Abstract access 

Cost-effectiveness of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention in men who have sex with men in the UK: a modelling study and health economic evaluation.

Cambiano V, Miners A, Dunn D, McCormack S, Ong KJ, Gill ON, Nardone A, Desai M, Field N, Hart G, Delpech V, Cairns G, Rodger A, Phillips AN. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 Oct 17. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30540-6. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: In the UK, HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) has remained high for several years, despite widespread use of antiretroviral therapy and high rates of virological suppression. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been shown to be highly effective in preventing further infections in MSM, but its cost-effectiveness is uncertain.

Methods: In this modelling study and economic evaluation, we calibrated a dynamic, individual-based stochastic model, the HIV Synthesis Model, to multiple data sources (surveillance data provided by Public Health England and data from a large, nationally representative survey, Natsal-3) on HIV among MSM in the UK. We did a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (sampling 22 key parameters) along with a range of univariate sensitivity analyses to evaluate the introduction of a PrEP programme with sexual event-based use of emtricitabine and tenofovir for MSM who had condomless anal sexual intercourse in the previous 3 months, a negative HIV test at baseline, and a negative HIV test in the preceding year. The main model outcomes were the number of HIV infections, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and costs.

Findings: Introduction of such a PrEP programme, with around 4000 MSM initiated on PrEP by the end of the first year and almost 40 000 by the end of the 15th year, would result in a total cost saving (£1·0 billion discounted), avert 25% of HIV infections (42% of which would be directly because of PrEP), and lead to a gain of 40 000 discounted QALYs over an 80-year time horizon. This result was particularly sensitive to the time horizon chosen, the cost of antiretroviral drugs (for treatment and PrEP), and the underlying trend in condomless sex.

Interpretation: This analysis suggests that the introduction of a PrEP programme for MSM in the UK is cost-effective and possibly cost-saving in the long term. A reduction in the cost of antiretroviral drugs (including the drugs used for PrEP) would substantially shorten the time for cost savings to be realised.

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Europe
France, United Kingdom
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Peer led activities increase HIV testing uptake among MSM

Effectiveness of peer-led interventions to increase HIV testing among men who have sex with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Shangani S, Escudero D, Kirwa K, Harrison A, Marshall B, Operario D. AIDS Care. 2017 Feb 2:1-11. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2017.1282105. [Epub ahead of print]

HIV testing constitutes a key step along the continuum of HIV care. Men who have sex with men (MSM) have low HIV testing rates and delayed diagnosis, especially in low-resource settings. Peer-led interventions offer a strategy to increase testing rates in this population. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes evidence on the effectiveness of peer-led interventions to increase the uptake of HIV testing among MSM. Using a systematic review protocol that was developed a priori, we searched PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL for articles reporting original results of randomized or non-randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental interventions, and pre- and post-intervention studies. Studies were eligible if they targeted MSM and utilized peers to increase HIV testing. We included studies published in or after 1996 to focus on HIV testing during the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Seven studies encompassing a total of 6205 participants met eligibility criteria, including two quasi-experimental studies, four non-randomized pre- and-post intervention studies, and one cluster randomized trial. Four studies were from high-income countries, two were from Asia and only one from sub-Saharan Africa. We assigned four studies a "moderate" methodological rigor rating and three a "strong" rating. Meta-analysis of the seven studies found HIV testing rates were statistically significantly higher in the peer-led intervention groups versus control groups (pooled OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.74-2.31). Among randomized trials, HIV testing rates were significantly higher in the peer-led intervention versus control groups (pooled OR: 2.48, 95% CI 1.99-3.08). Among the non-randomized pre- and post-intervention studies, the overall pooled OR for intervention versus control groups was 1.71 (95% CI 1.42-2.06), with substantial heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 70%, p < 0.02). Overall, peer-led interventions increased HIV testing among MSM but more data from high-quality studies are needed to evaluate effects of peer-led interventions on HIV testing among MSM in low- and middle-income countries.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: A key driver of the HIV epidemic is low uptake of HIV testing in many settings. This leads to a high proportion of individuals living with HIV being unaware of their status, failing to engage with care and treatment and hence being at risk of transmitting HIV to others. Recent reviews have illustrated that programmes led by members of the same peer group can be effective in promoting HIV-associated behavioural change and improving clinical outcomes. Gay men and other men who have sex with men can experience specific challenges associated with engagement with HIV care. This problem is particularly acute in resource poor regions due to very high levels of stigma.

This systematic review is the first to look specifically at the effectiveness of peer-led activities among gay men and other men who have sex with men. Seven studies were found which fulfilled the inclusion criteria of assessing the impact of peer-led activities on HIV testing uptake among gay men and other men who have sex with men. Four of these were in high income settings, and the others in Peru, Taiwan and Kenya. Each study illustrated a positive effect of peer-led activities on increasing HIV testing rates, and meta-analyses illustrated consistent effects when data were stratified by sub-groups (study methodology, study quality or setting). However, the generalizability of these studies to the entire population of gay men and other men who have sex with men is a concern recognized by the authors as the majority used gay-centric community venues to recruit participants. This is likely to exclude individuals who do not self-identify as being part of this community. Two studies, one in Taiwan and the other in Peru, used social-media as a mechanism of recruitment. This approach may lead to a wider recruitment, although not accessible to people without access to the internet.

Overall, this review emphasizes the potential of peer-led activities to overcome barriers to engage with testing and treatment experienced by gay men and other men who have sex with men and other hard to reach and high-risk sub-populations. It also illustrated the very limited current evidence available to assess such programmes.

 

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School-based HIV prevention programmes appear ineffective

School-based interventions for preventing HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy in adolescents.

Mason-Jones AJ, Sinclair D, Mathews C, Kagee A, Hillman A, Lombard C. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Nov 8;11:CD006417.

Background: School-based sexual and reproductive health programmes are widely accepted as an approach to reducing high-risk sexual behaviour among adolescents. Many studies and systematic reviews have concentrated on measuring effects on knowledge or self-reported behaviour rather than biological outcomes, such as pregnancy or prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of school-based sexual and reproductive health programmes on sexually transmitted infections (such as HIV, herpes simplex virus, and syphilis), and pregnancy among adolescents.

Search methods: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for published peer-reviewed journal articles; and ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for prospective trials; AIDS Education and Global Information System (AEGIS) and National Library of Medicine (NLM) gateway for conference presentations; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNAIDS, the WHO and the National Health Service (NHS) centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) websites from 1990 to 7 April 2016. We hand searched the reference lists of all relevant papers.

Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), both individually randomized and cluster-randomized, that evaluated school-based programmes aimed at improving the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents.

Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, evaluated risk of bias, and extracted data. When appropriate, we obtained summary measures of treatment effect through a random-effects meta-analysis and we reported them using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results: We included eight cluster-RCTs that enrolled 55,157 participants. Five trials were conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and Kenya), one in Latin America (Chile), and two in Europe (England and Scotland). Sexual and reproductive health educational programmes. Six trials evaluated school-based educational interventions. In these trials, the educational programmes evaluated had no demonstrable effect on the prevalence of HIV (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.32, three trials; 14 163 participants; low certainty evidence), or other STIs (herpes simplex virus prevalence: RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.15; three trials, 17 445 participants; moderate certainty evidence; syphilis prevalence: RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.39; one trial, 6977 participants; low certainty evidence). There was also no apparent effect on the number of young women who were pregnant at the end of the trial (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.16; three trials, 8280 participants; moderate certainty evidence). Material or monetary incentive-based programmes to promote school attendance. Two trials evaluated incentive-based programmes to promote school attendance. In these two trials, the incentives used had no demonstrable effect on HIV prevalence (RR 1.23, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.96; two trials, 3805 participants; low certainty evidence). Compared to controls, the prevalence of herpes simplex virus infection was lower in young women receiving a monthly cash incentive to stay in school (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.85), but not in young people given free school uniforms (data not pooled, two trials, 7229 participants; very low certainty evidence). One trial evaluated the effects on syphilis and the prevalence was too low to detect or exclude effects confidently (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.05 to 3.27; one trial, 1291 participants; very low certainty evidence). However, the number of young women who were pregnant at the end of the trial was lower among those who received incentives (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.99; two trials, 4200 participants; low certainty evidence). Combined educational and incentive-based programmes. The single trial that evaluated free school uniforms also included a trial arm in which participants received both uniforms and a programme of sexual and reproductive education. In this trial arm herpes simplex virus infection was reduced (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.99; one trial, 5899 participants; low certainty evidence), predominantly in young women, but no effect was detected for HIV or pregnancy (low certainty evidence).

Authors' conclusions: There is a continued need to provide health services to adolescents that include contraceptive choices and condoms and that involve them in the design of services. Schools may be a good place in which to provide these services. There is little evidence that educational curriculum-based programmes alone are effective in improving sexual and reproductive health outcomes for adolescents. Incentive-based interventions that focus on keeping young people in secondary school may reduce adolescent pregnancy but further trials are needed to confirm this.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: School-based HIV prevention programmes are widespread worldwide. These programmes use educational institutions as a venue to reach a population that is entering sexual maturity. Several systematic reviews have found beneficial effects of these programmes on HIV-associated knowledge and behaviours, though a subsequent effect of reduced HIV incidence remains unconfirmed. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, the authors included eight randomized controlled trials from sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Whether using a curriculum- or incentive-based programme, the trials did not provide evidence of an effect of school-based programmes on reducing HIV infection. Nor was there compelling evidence of an effect of these programmes on reducing sexually transmitted infection or pregnancy. This paper highlights the difficulty of translating knowledge and reported behaviors into reductions in HIV infection and other biological outcomes. Further thought is necessary to deliver effective sexual and reproductive health programmes in schools – possibly including incentives, which show some promise but need further evidence on effectiveness. 

Africa, Europe, Latin America
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Weekends off ART: a strategy to maintain adherence in children and adolescents?

Weekends-off efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children, adolescents, and young adults (BREATHER): a randomised, open-label, non-inferiority, phase 2/3 trial.

The BREATHER (PENTA 16) Trial Group. Lancet HIV. 2016 Sep;3(9):e421-30. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30054-6. Epub 2016 Jun 20.

Background: For HIV-1-infected young people facing lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), short cycle therapy with long-acting drugs offers potential for drug-free weekends, less toxicity, and better quality-of-life. We aimed to compare short cycle therapy (5 days on, 2 days off ART) versus continuous therapy (continuous ART).

Methods: In this open-label, non-inferiority trial (BREATHER), eligible participants were aged 8-24 years, were stable on first-line efavirenz with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and had HIV-1 RNA viral load less than 50 copies per mL for 12 months or longer. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to remain on continuous therapy or change to short cycle therapy according to a computer-generated randomisation list, with permuted blocks of varying size, stratified by age and African versus non-African sites; the list was prepared by the trial statistician and randomisation was done via a web service accessed by site clinician or one of the three coordinating trials units. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants with confirmed viral load 50 copies per mL or higher at any time up to the 48 week assessment, estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. The trial was powered to exclude a non-inferiority margin of 12%. Analyses were intention to treat. The trial was registered with EudraCT, number 2009-012947-40, ISRCTN, number 97755073, and CTA, number 27505/0005/001-0001.

Findings: Between April 1, 2011, and June 28, 2013, 199 participants from 11 countries worldwide were randomly assigned, 99 to the short cycle therapy and 100 to continuous therapy, and were followed up until the last patient reached 48 weeks. 105 (53%) were men, median age was 14 years (IQR 12-18), and median CD4 cell count was 735 cells per µL (IQR 576-968). Six percent (6%) patients assigned to the short cycle therapy versus seven percent (7%) assigned to continuous therapy had confirmed viral load 50 copies per mL or higher (difference -1.2%, 90% CI -7.3 to 4.9, non-inferiority shown). 13 grade 3 or 4 events occurred in the short cycle therapy group and 14 in the continuous therapy group (p=0.89). Two ART-related adverse events (one gynaecomastia and one spontaneous abortion) occurred in the short cycle therapy group compared with 14 (p=0.02) in the continuous therapy group (five lipodystrophy, two gynaecomastia, one suicidal ideation, one dizziness, one headache and syncope, one spontaneous abortion, one neutropenia, and two raised transaminases).

Interpretation: Non-inferiority of maintaining virological suppression in children, adolescents, and young adults was shown for short cycle therapy versus continuous therapy at 48 weeks, with similar resistance and a better safety profile. This short cycle therapy strategy is a viable option for adherent HIV-infected young people who are stable on efavirenz-based ART.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Increasing number of children born with HIV infection, who would otherwise have died in infancy, are now reaching adolescence because of the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Adherence to treatment for chronic illnesses often drops as children approach adolescence, and unfortunately HIV is no exception.  

BREATHER is an open-label, non-inferiority trial comparing continuous daily ART (CT) with short cycle treatment (SCT) enabling two days off treatment every week. The participants were aged 8 to 24 years and had to have been virally suppressed for at least one year prior to enrolment on an ART regimen containing efavirenz. At 48 weeks, 6.1% of children in the SCT arm versus 7.3% in the CT arm had virologic rebound (defined as an HIV viral load > 50 copies/ml), demonstrating that SCT is non-inferior to CT. There was no statistical difference between arms in the proportion who developed major resistance mutations or in proportion of adverse events.

This is the first trial to demonstrate that controlled interruption appears to be safe in terms of maintaining viral suppression and lack of emergence of drug resistance mutations. Notably, the trial was conducted in geographically diverse settings (11 countries) and achieved an impressive retention rate with only one participant being lost to follow-up. In addition, the strategy was highly acceptable to participants, particularly as it provided a legitimate way of missing doses. Children are expected to take ART for 20 years longer on average than adults and strategies that enable time off ART may be an effective way to reduce treatment fatigue. In addition, reduced ART usage may provide potential cost savings. 

A concern, however, is that such a strategy may give out the detrimental message that missing doses is acceptable and may not affect the viral load. Therefore, appropriate counselling is important to ensure that people understand that there is a maximum break in treatment of two designated days per week. It is also important to note that the findings of this study are only generalisable to people who are stable on ART, who have not experienced treatment failure and who are taking efavirenz-based regimens. The trial was carried out with intensive viral load monitoring and further research is required to work out how such a strategy could be safely implemented in settings where routine viral load monitoring may not be available.

Viral suppression is the ultimate goal to improve health outcomes and reduce HIV transmission. Consistent adherence to ART is critical to ensure sustained virologic suppression. Children and adolescents face multiple challenges to adhere to treatment and a number of different approaches to address this are required- this trial now provides an innovative and promising option to offer to children.

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Changes in sexual risk behaviour and sustained HIV incidence among MSM in the UK

Sexual behaviours, HIV testing, and the proportion of men at risk of transmitting and acquiring HIV in London, UK, 2000-13: a serial cross-sectional study.

Aghaizu A, Wayal S, Nardone A, Parsons V, Copas A, Mercey D, Hart G, Gilson R, Johnson AM. Lancet HIV. 2016 Sep;3(9):e431-40. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30037-6. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Background: HIV incidence in men who have sex with men (MSM) in the UK has remained unchanged over the past decade despite increases in HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage. In this study, we examine trends in sexual behaviours and HIV testing in MSM and explore the risk of transmitting and acquiring HIV.

Methods: In this serial cross-sectional study, we obtained data from ten cross-sectional surveys done between 2000 and 2013, consisting of anonymous self-administered questionnaires and oral HIV antibody testing in MSM recruited in gay social venues in London, UK. Data were collected between October and January for all survey years up to 2008 and between February and August thereafter. All men older than 16 years were eligible to take part and fieldworkers attempted to approach all MSM in each venue and recorded refusal rates. Data were collected on demographic and sexual behavioural characteristics. We analysed trends over time using linear, logistic, and quantile regression.

Findings: Of 13 861 questionnaires collected between 2000 and 2013, we excluded 1985 (124 had completed the survey previously or were heterosexual reporting no anal intercourse in the past year, and 1861 did not provide samples for antibody testing). Of the 11 876 eligible MSM recruited, 1512 (13%) were HIV positive, with no significant trend in HIV positivity over time. 35% (531 of 1505) of HIV-positive MSM had undiagnosed infection, which decreased non-linearly over time from 34% (45 of 131) to 24% (25 of 106; p=0.01), while recent HIV testing (ie, in the past year) increased from 26% (263 of 997) to 60% (467 of 777; p<0.0001). The increase in recent testing in undiagnosed men (from 29% to 67%, p<0.0001) and HIV-negative men (from 26% to 62%, p<0.0001) suggests that undiagnosed infection might increasingly be recently acquired infection. The proportion of MSM reporting unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the past year increased from 43% (513 of 1187) to 53% (394 of 749; p<0.0001) and serosorting (exclusively) increased from 18% (207 of 1132) to 28% (177 of 6369; p<0.0001). 268 (2%) of 11 570 participants had undiagnosed HIV and reported UAI in the past year were at risk of transmitting HIV. Additionally 259 (2%) had diagnosed infection and reported UAI and non-exclusive serosorting in the past year. Although we did not collect data on antiretroviral therapy or viral load, surveillance data suggests that a small proportion of men with diagnosed infection will have detectable viral load and hence might also be at risk of transmitting HIV. 2633 (25%) of 10 364 participants were at high risk of acquiring HIV (defined as HIV-negative MSM either reporting one or more casual UAI partners in the past year or not exclusively serosorting). The proportions of MSM at risk of transmission or acquisition changed little over time (p=0.96 for MSM potentially at risk of transmission and p=0.275 for MSM at high risk of acquiring HIV). Undiagnosed men reporting UAI and diagnosed men not exclusively serosorting had consistently higher partner numbers than did other MSM over the period (median ranged from one to three across surveys in undiagnosed men reporting UAI, two to ten in diagnosed men not exclusively serosorting, and none to two in other men).

Interpretation: An increasing proportion of undiagnosed HIV infections in MSM in London might have been recently acquired, which is when people are likely to be most infectious. High UAI partner numbers of MSM at risk of transmitting HIV and the absence of a significant decrease in the proportion of men at high risk of acquiring the infection might explain the sustained HIV incidence. Implementation of combination prevention interventions comprising both behavioural and biological interventions to reduce community-wide risk is crucial to move towards eradication of HIV.

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Editor’s notes: Despite wide-scale ART coverage, HIV incidence among gay men and other men who have sex with men remains high in many high-income countries, and is increasing in some locations. Although expanded testing and treatment are expected to lower HIV incidence, there are concerns that changes in risk behaviour may offset the impact of ART on HIV transmission. In this paper, the authors illustrate that among gay men and other men who have sex with men in London, the proportion who had tested for HIV in the past year increased considerably over the period 2000 and 2013, with a corresponding decrease in the numbers with undiagnosed HIV.  However, there were increasing rates of condomless anal intercourse in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive men.  Furthermore, men living with HIV who were undiagnosed, and men who were not exclusively serosorting (having sex with partners of the presumed same HIV status), reported increased numbers of sexual partners over the period of the surveys. Despite the increases in recent HIV testing, three percent of men in 2013 incorrectly perceived themselves to be HIV negative. This suggests that many men who are undiagnosed may be recent infections, so could be at high risk of transmission. Previous modelling studies have illustrated that increased sexual risk behaviour, particular among people who are unaware that they are HIV positive, could account for the observed increase in incidence in gay men and other men who have sex with men. The findings of this study demonstrate the importance of core groups to the continued transmission of HIV. Test and treat programmes alone may not be sufficient to reduce HIV incidence in gay men and other men who have sex with men populations. There is the need for appropriately tailored combination prevention programmes in order to make real gains against HIV among gay men and other men who have sex with men.

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Weekend breaks on efavirenz-based ART non-inferior in adolescents

BREATHER (PENTA 16) short-cycle therapy (SCT) (5 days on/2 days off) in young people with chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection: an open, randomised, parallel-group Phase II/III trial.

Butler K, Inshaw J, Ford D, Bernays S, Scott K, Kenny J, Klein N, Turkova A, Harper L, Nastouli E, Paparini S, Choudhury R, Rhodes T, Babiker A, Gibb D. Health Technol Assess. 2016 Jun;20(49):1-108. doi: 10.3310/hta20490.

Background: For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents facing lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), short-cycle therapy (SCT) with long-acting agents offers the potential for drug-free weekends, less toxicity, better adherence and cost savings.

Objectives: To determine whether or not efavirenz (EFV)-based ART in short cycles of 5 days on and 2 days off is as efficacious (in maintaining virological suppression) as continuous EFV-based ART (continuous therapy; CT). Secondary objectives included the occurrence of new clinical HIV events or death, changes in immunological status, emergence of HIV drug resistance, drug toxicity and changes in therapy.

Design: Open, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

Setting: Europe, Thailand, Uganda, Argentina and the USA.

Participants: Young people (aged 8-24 years) on EFV plus two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and with a HIV-1 ribonucleic acid level [viral load (VL)] of < 50 copies/ml for > 12 months.

Interventions: Young people were randomised to continue daily ART (CT) or change to SCT (5 days on, 2 days off ART).

Main outcome measures: Follow-up was for a minimum of 48 weeks (0, 4 and 12 weeks and then 12-weekly visits). The primary outcome was the difference between arms in the proportion with VL > 50 copies/ml (confirmed) by 48 weeks, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method (12% non-inferiority margin) adjusted for region and age.

Results: In total, 199 young people (11 countries) were randomised (n = 99 SCT group, n = 100 CT group) and followed for a median of 86 weeks. Overall, 53% were male; the median age was 14 years (21% ≥ 18 years); 13% were from the UK, 56% were black, 19% were Asian and 21% were Caucasian; and the median CD4% and CD4 count were 34% and 735 cells/mm3, respectively. By week 48, only one participant (CT) was lost to follow-up. The SCT arm had a 27% decreased drug exposure as measured by the adherence questionnaire and a MEMSCap Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMSCap Inc., Durham, NC, USA) substudy (median cap openings per week: SCT group, n = 5; CT group, n = 7). By 48 weeks, six participants in the SCT group and seven in the CT group had a confirmed VL > 50 copies/ml [difference -1.2%, 90% confidence interval (CI) -7.3% to 4.9%] and two in the SCT group and four in the CT group had a confirmed VL > 400 copies/ml (difference -2.1%, 90% CI -6.2% to 1.9%). All six participants in the SCT group with a VL > 50 copies/ml resumed daily ART, of whom five were resuppressed, three were on the same regimen and two with a switch; two others on SCT resumed daily ART for other reasons. Overall, three participants in the SCT group and nine in the CT group (p = 0.1) changed ART regimen, five because of toxicity, four for simplification reasons, two because of compliance issues and one because of VL failure. Seven young people (SCT group, n = 2; CT group, n = 5) had major non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations at VL failure, of whom two (n = 1 SCT group, n = 1 CT group) had the M184V mutation. Two young people had new Centers for Disease Control B events (SCT group, n = 1; CT group, n = 1). There were no significant differences between SCT and CT in grade 3/4 adverse events (13 vs. 14) or in serious adverse events (7 vs. 6); there were fewer ART-related adverse events in the SCT arm (2 vs. 14; p = 0.02). At week 48 there was no evidence that SCT led to increased inflammation using an extensive panel of markers. Young people expressed a strong preference for SCT in a qualitative substudy and in pre- and post-trial questionnaires. In total, 98% of the young people are taking part in a 2-year follow-up extension of the trial.

Conclusions: Non-inferiority of VL suppression in young people on EFV-based first-line ART with a VL of < 50 copies/ml was demonstrated for SCT compared with CT, with similar resistance, safety and inflammatory marker profiles. The SCT group had fewer ART-related adverse events. Further evaluation of the immunological and virological impact of SCT is ongoing. A limitation of the trial is that the results cannot be generalised to settings where VL monitoring is either not available or infrequent, nor to use of low-dose EFV. Two-year extended follow-up of the trial is ongoing to confirm the durability of the SCT strategy. Further trials of SCT in settings with infrequent VL monitoring and with other antiretroviral drugs such as tenofovir alafenamide, which has a long intracellular half-life, and/or dolutegravir, which has a higher barrier to resistance, are planned.

Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN97755073; EUDRACT 2009-012947-40; and CTA 27505/0005/001-0001.

Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme (projects 08/53/25 and 11/136/108), the European Commission through EuroCoord (FP7/2007/2015), the Economic and Social Research Council, the PENTA Foundation, the Medical Research Council and INSERM SC10-US19, France, and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 49. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Adherence to ART has been shown to deteriorate in adolescence, with missed doses occurring particularly at weekends. Pharmacokinetic properties of some ART drugs, such as efavirenz, allow for a break in pill taking without a break in effective treatment. Non-inferiority trials evaluating five days on, two days off in adults have shown continuous ART to be non-inferior with low rates of virologic rebound.  This formed the rationale for this global, randomised Phase II/III trial in young people.

In the BREATHER trial, non-inferiority of viral suppression in adolescents on efavirenz-based first-line ART was shown for short-cycle treatment compared with continuous treatment. Overall 93% of adolescents remained virally suppressed. Findings from the two-year long-term follow-up phase will confirm if short-cycle treatment is effective and safe in this population.  Further studies are required to confirm the applicability of this strategy in real-life settings where viral load monitoring is likely to be less frequent than in a trial setting.

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Improved survival with lymphoma in the antiretroviral therapy era

Evolution of HIV-associated lymphoma over 3 decades.

Ramaswami R, Chia G, Dalla Pria A, Pinato DJ, Parker K, Nelson M, Bower M. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016 Jun 1;72(2):177-83. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000946.

Introduction: The emergence of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and improvements in the management of opportunistic infections have altered the HIV epidemic over the last 30 years. We aimed to assess changes to the biology and outcomes of HIV-associated lymphomas over this period at the national center for HIV oncology in the United Kingdom.

Methods: Clinical characteristics at lymphoma diagnosis have been prospectively collected since 1986, along with details of lymphoma treatment and outcomes. The clinical features and outcomes were compared between 3 decades: pre-cART decade (1986-1995), early-cART decade (1996-2005), and late-cART decade (2006-2015).

Results: A total of 615 patients with HIV-associated lymphoma were included in the study: 158 patients in the pre-cART era, 200 patients in the early-cART era, and 257 patients in the late-cART era. In more recent decades, patients were older (P < 0.0001) and had higher CD4 cell counts (P < 0.0001) at lymphoma diagnosis. Over time, there has also been a shift in lymphoma histological subtypes, with an increase in lymphoma subtypes associated with moderate immunosuppression. The overall survival for patients with HIV-associated lymphoma has dramatically improved over the 3 decades (P < 0.0001).

Conclusion: Over the last 30 years, the clinical demographic of HIV-associated lymphomas has evolved, and the outcomes have improved.

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Editor’s notes: Lymphomas are the second most common malignancy after Kaposi’s sarcoma among people living with HIV in Europe, Australia and northern America. This study examined how the biology and rates of survival have changed since combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) became available.

People living with HIV and diagnosed with lymphoma over the past thirty years in a specialist oncology centre in the United Kingdom were included in the study. The mean age at diagnosis of lymphoma increased over time, most likely reflecting improvement in life expectancy with cART. As would be expected, the mean CD4 count and the proportion of people with a suppressed viral load at lymphoma diagnosis increased, while proportion with an AIDS-defining illness before lymphoma diagnosis declined significantly.  

This study demonstrated a shift of the histological subtypes of lymphoma that are associated with less severe immunosuppression, for example the proportion of primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which are associated with severe immunosuppression, declined, while the proportion of Burkitt’s lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (associated with less profound immunosuppression) increased.

A key finding of this study was the significantly improved overall survival of people with lymphoma. The improved survival is not explained by changes in histological subtypes of lymphoma over time, as improvement in prognosis was observed for each histological subtype. The substantial improvement in overall survival is attributable to a number of factors. They include the availability of cART, attention to opportunistic infection prophylaxis, improved supportive care for people undergoing lymphoma treatment as well as improved modalities of lymphoma treatment. Such modalities include efficacious drugs that can be safely co-administered with cART, e.g., rituximab, novel agents and use of autologous stem cell transplants.  

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Oral PrEP reduces risk of HIV and does not result in riskier sex

Effectiveness and safety of oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for all populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Fonner VA, Dalglish SL, Kennedy CE, Baggaley R, O'Reilly K R, Koechlin FM, Rodolph M, Hodges-Mameletzis I, Grant RM. AIDS. 2016 May 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) offers a promising new approach to HIV prevention. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the evidence for use of oral PrEP containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) as an additional HIV prevention strategy in populations at substantial risk for HIV based on HIV acquisition, adverse events, drug resistance, sexual behavior, and reproductive health outcomes.

Design: Rigorous systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: A comprehensive search strategy reviewed three electronic databases and conference abstracts through April 2015. Pooled effect estimates were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis.

Results: Eighteen studies were included, comprising data from 39 articles and six conference abstracts. Across populations and PrEP regimens, PrEP significantly reduced the risk of HIV acquisition compared to placebo. Trials with PrEP use >70% demonstrated the highest PrEP effectiveness (RR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.21-0.45, p < 0.001) compared to placebo. Trials with low PrEP use did not show a significantly protective effect. Adverse events were similar between PrEP and placebo groups. More cases of drug-resistant HIV infection were found among PrEP users who initiated PrEP while acutely HIV-infected, but incidence of acquiring drug-resistant HIV during PrEP use was low. Studies consistently found no association between PrEP use and changes in sexual risk behavior. PrEP was not associated with increased pregnancy-related adverse events or hormonal contraception effectiveness.

Conclusion: PrEP is protective against HIV infection across populations, presents few significant safety risks, and no evidence of behavioral risk compensation. The effective and cost-effective use of PrEP will require development of best practices for fostering uptake and adherence among people at substantial HIV-risk.

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Editor’s notes: This systematic review is the first to aggregate data from across oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) studies, including randomized control trials and observational studies, to present clear evidence on the effectiveness of oral PrEP use. The findings confirm that oral PrEP significantly reduces the risk of acquiring HIV if taken consistently and correctly across populations, countries, and most age groups. Differences in efficacy directly correlate with adherence, which accounts for the lower efficacy seen in some subgroups. Perhaps two of the most compelling analyses presented in this paper relate to resistance and behavioural disinhibition. The risk of resistance was shown to be quite low, and study participants exhibiting resistant HIV either enrolled in the studies during an acute infection stage or acquired resistant strains during the course of the research. Regarding behavioural disinhibition, indicators measured such as rates of sexually transmitted infections revealed that PrEP use in the efficacy trials was not associated with behavioural disinhibition and in some studies, resulted in even safer sexual behaviour than what was reported at baseline. Recently completed demonstration projects have reported increased rates of STIs among gay men and other men who have sex with men. However, in the open-label extensions included in this review, where counselling was more intensive, safer sex practices were maintained, thus suggesting that counselling can be effective in preventing behavioural disinhibition. 

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What works to link people living with HIV to care - a review

Facilitators and barriers in HIV linkage to care interventions: a qualitative evidence review.

Tso LS, Best J, Beanland R, Doherty M, Lackey M, Ma Q, Hall BJ, Yang B, Tucker JD. AIDS. 2016 Apr 6. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: To synthesize qualitative evidence on linkage to care interventions for people living with HIV.

Design: Systematic literature review.

Methods: We searched nineteen databases for studies reporting qualitative evidence on linkage interventions. Data extraction and thematic analysis were used to synthesize findings. Quality was assessed using the CASP tool and certainty of evidence was evaluated using the CERQual approach.

Results: Twenty-five studies from eleven countries focused on adults (24 studies), adolescents (8 studies), and pregnant women (4 Facilitators included community-level factors (i.e. task-shifting, mobile outreach, integrated HIV and primary services, supportive cessation programs for substance users, active referrals, and dedicated case management teams) and individual-level factors (encouragement of peers/family and positive interactions with healthcare providers in transitioning into care). One key barrier for people living with HIV was perceived inability of providers to ensure confidentiality as part of linkage to care interventions. Providers reported difficulties navigating procedures across disparate facilities and having limited resources for linkage to care interventions.

Conclusions: Our findings extend the literature by highlighting the importance of task-shifting, mobile outreach, and integrated HIV and primary services. Both community and individual level factors may increase the feasibility and acceptability of HIV linkage to care interventions. These findings may inform policies to increase the reach of HIV services available in communities.

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Editor’s notes: As the authors of this paper observe, most evaluations of linkage to care programmes have focused on quantitative assessment. This useful paper provides a thorough overview of the findings from 25 studies which used qualitative methods for assessment. Linkage-to- care programmes feasible in different country settings were identified in this review.  The authors also highlight gaps, most notably a lack of information on linkage-to-care programmes for men. They also note the need for longitudinal assessments that look at changes over time.

This paper is a useful synthesis of findings. But it is also an excellent example of how to carry out a systematic review of qualitative research. The description of the qualitative meta-synthesis the authors performed adds additional value to this paper. 

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