Articles tagged as "United Kingdom"

What works to link people living with HIV to care - a review

Facilitators and barriers in HIV linkage to care interventions: a qualitative evidence review.

Tso LS, Best J, Beanland R, Doherty M, Lackey M, Ma Q, Hall BJ, Yang B, Tucker JD. AIDS. 2016 Apr 6. [Epub ahead of print]

Objective: To synthesize qualitative evidence on linkage to care interventions for people living with HIV.

Design: Systematic literature review.

Methods: We searched nineteen databases for studies reporting qualitative evidence on linkage interventions. Data extraction and thematic analysis were used to synthesize findings. Quality was assessed using the CASP tool and certainty of evidence was evaluated using the CERQual approach.

Results: Twenty-five studies from eleven countries focused on adults (24 studies), adolescents (8 studies), and pregnant women (4 Facilitators included community-level factors (i.e. task-shifting, mobile outreach, integrated HIV and primary services, supportive cessation programs for substance users, active referrals, and dedicated case management teams) and individual-level factors (encouragement of peers/family and positive interactions with healthcare providers in transitioning into care). One key barrier for people living with HIV was perceived inability of providers to ensure confidentiality as part of linkage to care interventions. Providers reported difficulties navigating procedures across disparate facilities and having limited resources for linkage to care interventions.

Conclusions: Our findings extend the literature by highlighting the importance of task-shifting, mobile outreach, and integrated HIV and primary services. Both community and individual level factors may increase the feasibility and acceptability of HIV linkage to care interventions. These findings may inform policies to increase the reach of HIV services available in communities.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: As the authors of this paper observe, most evaluations of linkage to care programmes have focused on quantitative assessment. This useful paper provides a thorough overview of the findings from 25 studies which used qualitative methods for assessment. Linkage-to- care programmes feasible in different country settings were identified in this review.  The authors also highlight gaps, most notably a lack of information on linkage-to-care programmes for men. They also note the need for longitudinal assessments that look at changes over time.

This paper is a useful synthesis of findings. But it is also an excellent example of how to carry out a systematic review of qualitative research. The description of the qualitative meta-synthesis the authors performed adds additional value to this paper. 

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High TB mortality among people living with HIV in eastern Europe: a growing concern

Tuberculosis-related mortality in people living with HIV in Europe and Latin America: an international cohort study. 

Podlekareva DN, Efsen AM, Schultze A, Post FA, Skrahina AM, Panteleev A, Furrer H, Miller RF, Losso MH, Toibaro J, Miro JM, Vassilenko A, Girardi E, Bruyand M, Obel N, Lundgren JD, Mocroft A, Kirk O, TB:HIV study group in EuroCoord. Lancet HIV. 2016 Mar;3(3):e120-31. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(15)00252-0. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

Background: Management of tuberculosis in patients with HIV in eastern Europe is complicated by the high prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, low rates of drug susceptibility testing, and poor access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We report 1 year mortality estimates from a multiregional (eastern Europe, western Europe, and Latin America) prospective cohort study: the TB:HIV study.

Methods: Consecutive HIV-positive patients aged 16 years or older with a diagnosis of tuberculosis between Jan 1, 2011, and Dec 31, 2013, were enrolled from 62 HIV and tuberculosis clinics in 19 countries in eastern Europe, western Europe, and Latin America. The primary endpoint was death within 12 months after starting tuberculosis treatment; all deaths were classified according to whether or not they were tuberculosis related. Follow-up was either until death, the final visit, or 12 months after baseline, whichever occurred first. Risk factors for all-cause and tuberculosis-related deaths were assessed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox models.

Findings: Of 1406 patients (834 in eastern Europe, 317 in western Europe, and 255 in Latin America), 264 (19%) died within 12 months. 188 (71%) of these deaths were tuberculosis related. The probability of all-cause death was 29% (95% CI 26-32) in eastern Europe, 4% (3-7) in western Europe, and 11% (8-16) in Latin America (p<0.0001) and the corresponding probabilities of tuberculosis-related death were 23% (20-26), 1% (0-3), and 4% (2-8), respectively (p<0.0001). Patients receiving care outside eastern Europe had a 77% decreased risk of death: adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.23 (95% CI 0.16-0.31). In eastern Europe, compared with patients who started a regimen with at least three active antituberculosis drugs, those who started fewer than three active antituberculosis drugs were at a higher risk of tuberculosis-related death (aHR 3.17; 95% CI 1.83-5.49) as were those who did not have baseline drug-susceptibility tests (2.24; 1.31-3.83). Other prognostic factors for increased tuberculosis-related mortality were disseminated tuberculosis and a low CD4 cell count. 18% of patients were receiving ART at tuberculosis diagnosis in eastern Europe compared with 44% in western Europe and 39% in Latin America (p<0.0001); 12 months later the proportions were 67% in eastern Europe, 92% in western Europe, and 85% in Latin America (p<0.0001).

Interpretation: Patients with HIV and tuberculosis in eastern Europe have a risk of death nearly four-times higher than that in patients from western Europe and Latin America. This increased mortality rate is associated with modifiable risk factors such as lack of drug susceptibility testing and suboptimal initial antituberculosis treatment in settings with a high prevalence of drug resistance. Urgent action is needed to improve tuberculosis care for patients living with HIV in eastern Europe.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Eastern Europe is experiencing one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics globally. Within this, the number of HIV-positive people with tuberculosis (TB) is also rising rapidly, posing a significant public health challenge. The authors have previously reported retrospective data illustrating 30% mortality at one year among HIV-positive people with TB in eastern Europe. This was noted to be at least three times higher than mortality among people from western Europe and Argentina. Within this study they go further to provide prospective data with comparison across multiple regions. They also highlight prognostic markers associated with death.

The study spans across eastern Europe, western Europe and Latin America with a cohort of 1406 people. It robustly demonstrates a significant excess of TB-associated mortality in HIV-positive people with TB receiving care in eastern Europe. The cumulative probability of TB-associated death at 12 months in eastern Europe was 23% (95% confidence interval [CI] 20 – 26), versus 1% (95% CI 0 - 3) in western Europe and 4% (95% CI 2-8) in Latin America. Prognostic markers associated with an increased risk of death included multidrug-resistant TB, disseminated TB and modifiable factors such as choice of initial anti-TB regimen and a lack of baseline drug susceptibility tests.

These findings highlight the hugely detrimental impact of the fragmented system of HIV and TB services within eastern Europe. Such inequality in outcomes emphasises the need for urgent strategic change. Co-ordinated care across HIV and TB services, alongside timely and appropriate diagnostics and treatment, is of paramount importance.

Europe, Latin America
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Tenofovir resistance – need for caution but not panic

Global epidemiology of drug resistance after failure of WHO recommended first-line regimens for adult HIV-1 infection: a multicentre retrospective cohort study.

TenoRes Study Group. Lancet Infect Dis. 2016 Jan 28. pii: S1473-3099(15)00536-8. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00536-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for controlling HIV-1 infection through wide-scale treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Potent tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-containing regimens are increasingly used to treat and prevent HIV, although few data exist for frequency and risk factors of acquired drug resistance in regions hardest hit by the HIV pandemic. We aimed to do a global assessment of drug resistance after virological failure with first-line tenofovir-containing ART.

Methods: The TenoRes collaboration comprises adult HIV treatment cohorts and clinical trials of HIV drug resistance testing in Europe, Latin and North America, sub-Saharan Africa, and Asia. We extracted and harmonised data for patients undergoing genotypic resistance testing after virological failure with a first-line regimen containing tenofovir plus a cytosine analogue (lamivudine or emtricitabine) plus a non-nucleotide reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI; efavirenz or nevirapine). We used an individual participant-level meta-analysis and multiple logistic regression to identify covariates associated with drug resistance. Our primary outcome was tenofovir resistance, defined as presence of K65R/N or K70E/G/Q mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene.

Findings: We included 1926 patients from 36 countries with treatment failure between 1998 and 2015. Prevalence of tenofovir resistance was highest in sub-Saharan Africa (370/654 [57%]). Pre-ART CD4 cell count was the covariate most strongly associated with the development of tenofovir resistance (odds ratio [OR] 1.50, 95% CI 1.27-1.77 for CD4 cell count <100 cells per µL). Use of lamivudine versus emtricitabine increased the risk of tenofovir resistance across regions (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.20-1.82). Of 700 individuals with tenofovir resistance, 578 (83%) had cytosine analogue resistance (M184V/I mutation), 543 (78%) had major NNRTI resistance, and 457 (65%) had both. The mean plasma viral load at virological failure was similar in individuals with and without tenofovir resistance (145 700 copies per mL [SE 12 480] versus 133 900 copies per mL [SE 16 650; p=0.626]).

Interpretation: We recorded drug resistance in a high proportion of patients after virological failure on a tenofovir-containing first-line regimen across low-income and middle-income regions. Effective surveillance for transmission of drug resistance is crucial.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: Global surveillance for tenofovir (TDF) resistance is important at a time of expanding use of TDF-containing regimens for treatment and prevention. This collaborative analysis used data collated from several small studies in different settings. Overall, around one in three people who had failed on TDF-containing treatment had evidence of TDF resistance, although this frequency varied between 20% in Europe to almost 60% in Africa. Mutations associated with NNRTIs and lamivudine/emtricitabine resistance were more common overall and were present in most people with TDF resistance.

The regional variation probably reflects differences in clinical practice and study inclusion criteria. All European studies involved cohorts with frequent viral load monitoring, whereas half of the African cohorts had no routine viral load monitoring. All European studies included people with virologic failure but with low-level viraemia (viral load <1000 copies/ml) whereas almost all African studies included only people with viral load >1000 copies/ml.

While these data provide useful estimates of the frequency of drug resistance mutations in people with virologic failure on first-line ART, there should be caution about extrapolating beyond this. Reports from cohort studies with an accurate denominator of all people starting TDF-containing first-line ART would be useful to give more reliable estimates of overall incidence of acquired TDF resistance. Moreover, there remains a need for representative population-based surveillance for acquired and transmitted drug resistance. So far, global surveillance has detected limited evidence of transmitted TDF-associated mutations, but this needs to be monitored closely, especially in high incidence settings.

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Abacavir: a safe first line drug for children

Adverse events associated with abacavir use in HIV-infected children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Jesson J, Dahourou DL, Renaud F, Penazzato M, Leroy V. Lancet HIV. 2016 Feb;3(2):e64-75. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(15)00225-8. Epub 2015 Dec 7.

Background: Concerns exist about the toxicity of drugs used in the implementation of large-scale antiretroviral programmes, and documentation of antiretroviral toxicity is essential. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse events among children and adolescents receiving regimens that contain abacavir, a widely used antiretroviral drug.

Methods: We searched bibliographic databases and abstracts from relevant conferences from Jan 1, 2000, to March 1, 2015. All experimental and observational studies of HIV-infected patients aged 0-18 years who used abacavir, were eligible. Incidence of adverse outcomes in patients taking abacavir (number of new events in a period divided by population at risk at the beginning of the study) and relative risks (RR) compared with non-abacavir regimens were pooled with random effects models.

Findings: Of 337 records and 21 conference abstracts identified, nine studies (eight full-text articles and one abstract) collected information about 2546 children, of whom 1769 (69%) were on abacavir regimens. Among children and adolescents taking abacavir, hypersensitivity reactions (eight studies) had a pooled incidence of 2.2% (95% CI 0.4-5.2); treatment switching or discontinuation (seven studies) pooled incidence was 10.9% (2.1-24.3); of grade 3-4 adverse events (six studies) pooled incidence was 9.9% (2.4-20.9); and adverse events other than hypersensitivity reaction (six studies) pooled incidence was 21.5% (2.8-48.4). Between-study inconsistency was significant for all outcomes (p<0.0001 for all inconsistencies). Incidence of death (four studies) was 3.3% (95% CI 1.5-5.6). In the three randomised clinical trials with comparative data, no increased risk of hypersensitivity reaction (pooled RR 1.08; 95% CI 0.19-6.15), grade 3 or 4 events (0.79 [0.44-1.42]), or death (1.72 [0.77-3.82]) was noted for abacavir relative to non-abacavir regimens. None of the reported deaths were related to abacavir.

Interpretation: Abacavir-related toxicity occurs early after ART initiation and is manageable. Abacavir can be safely used for first-line or second-line antiretroviral regimens in children and adolescents, especially in sub-Saharan Africa where HLA B5701 genotype is rare.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Abacavir is a nucleoside reverse transciptase inhibitor (NRTI), available as a paediatric formulation. Abacavir in combination with lamivudine is the preferred NRTI backbone for children aged three to ten years and for adolescents weighing under 35 kilograms. It is thus part of both first- and second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens recommended for children by World Health Organization (WHO), American and European guidelines.  

In the context of implementation of large-scale ART programmes where abacavir is recommended as the NRTI of choice, understanding its toxicity is crucial. In adults the main concern is the increased risk of hypersensitivity reactions, particularly among people with the HLA B5701 genotype, and of myocardial infarction. Children have specific characteristics that affect both the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs, and also drug tolerability in the short and the long term. Despite the widespread use of abacavir, there has been no systematic evaluation of the toxicity profile of abacavir in children. 

This systematic review of nine studies conducted between 2000 and 2015 demonstrates that there is a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions, especially for children living in sub-Saharan Africa, where 90% of children with HIV live. This is consistent with studies in adults which illustrates that the frequency of the HLAB5701 allele genotype in African populations is low, estimated to be less than two percent.

Other adverse events such as gastrointestinal symptoms and laboratory abnormalities were common. Rates of adverse events should be interpreted with caution as these could depend on factors such as other drugs in the regimen, adherence and so on. Furthermore, data on adverse events were obtained from cohort studies that were not blinded and selection or recall bias cannot be excluded.

Notwithstanding this, most adverse events occurred early after initiation of abacavir, were no more common than with other NRTI regimens, and were manageable. Importantly, there were no deaths associated with abacavir in any of the reported studies. This study supports the use of abacavir as a preferred drug in the NRTI backbone for treatment of children living with HIV. 

HIV Treatment
Africa, Europe, Latin America
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Untreated maternal HIV infection and poor perinatal outcomes

Perinatal outcomes associated with maternal HIV infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Wedi CO, Kirtley S, Hopewell S, Corrigan R, Kennedy SH, Hemelaar J. Lancet HIV. 2016 Jan;3(1):e33-48. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(15)00207-6. Epub 2015 Nov 27.

Background: The HIV pandemic affects 36.9 million people worldwide, of whom 1.5 million are pregnant women. 91% of HIV-positive pregnant women reside in sub-Saharan Africa, a region that also has very poor perinatal outcomes. We aimed to establish whether untreated maternal HIV infection is associated with specific perinatal outcomes.

Methods: We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of the scientific literature by searching PubMed, CINAHL (Ebscohost), Global Health (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and four clinical trial databases (WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, the ClinicalTrials.gov database, and the ISRCTN Registry) for studies published from Jan 1, 1980, to Dec 7, 2014. Two authors independently reviewed the studies retrieved by the scientific literature search, identified relevant studies, and extracted the data. We investigated the associations between maternal HIV infection in women naive to antiretroviral therapy and 11 perinatal outcomes: preterm birth, very preterm birth, low birthweight, very low birthweight, term low birthweight, preterm low birthweight, small for gestational age, very small for gestational age, miscarriage, stillbirth, and neonatal death. We included prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-control studies reporting perinatal outcomes in HIV-positive women naive to antiretroviral therapy and HIV-negative controls. We used a random-effects model for the meta-analyses of specific perinatal outcomes. We did subgroup and sensitivity analyses and assessed the effect of adjustment for confounders. This systematic review and meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42013005638.

Findings: Of 60 750 studies identified, we obtained data from 35 studies (20 prospective cohort studies, 12 retrospective cohort studies, and three case-control studies) including 53 623 women. Our meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies show that maternal HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (relative risk 1.50, 95% CI 1.24-1.82), low birthweight (1.62, 1.41-1.86), small for gestational age (1.31, 1.14-1.51), and stillbirth (1.67, 1.05-2.66). Retrospective cohort studies also suggest an increased risk of term low birthweight (2.62, 1.15-5.93) and preterm low birthweight (3.25, 2.12-4.99). The strongest and most consistent evidence for these associations is identified in sub-Saharan Africa. No association was identified between maternal HIV infection and very preterm birth, very small for gestational age, very low birthweight, miscarriage, or neonatal death, although few data were available for these outcomes. Correction for confounders did not affect the significance of these findings.

Interpretation: Maternal HIV infection in women who have not received antiretroviral therapy is associated with preterm birth, low birthweight, small for gestational age, and stillbirth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Research is needed to assess how antiretroviral therapy regimens affect these perinatal outcomes.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes:  Maternal HIV infection is associated with maternal morbidity and mortality and risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Whether maternal HIV infection affects perinatal outcomes, which are major contributors to poor health worldwide, is less well understood. This systematic review and meta-analysis of retrospective and prospective cohort studies and case-control studies demonstrates that untreated maternal HIV infection is associated with increased risk of pre-term birth, low birthweight, small for gestational age and stillbirth. The risk of adverse perinatal outcomes appeared to increase with more advanced HIV disease, although only three of the 35 studies reported perinatal outcomes according to HIV disease stage. These findings persisted even after controlling for potential confounding factors and irrespective of the method used for determining gestational age. None of the studies used a first trimester ultrasound scan, the gold standard for determining gestational age. The association of perinatal outcomes with the infant’s HIV status was not investigated. The strongest evidence for these associations was found in sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of the studies were conducted.

These findings suggest that HIV is an important contributor to the global burden of perinatal and child morbidity and mortality particularly in countries with the highest burden of maternal HIV infection.     Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest rates of stillbirths and neonatal deaths and is also the region where more than 90% of the world’s pregnant women living with HIV reside.

This study has important implications. Firstly, the coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among pregnant women worldwide still remains suboptimal (estimated to be 68% in 2013), exposing women living with untreated HIV to an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. The biological mechanisms underlying adverse perinatal outcomes in the context of HIV infection are not understood. ART in pregnancy may also adversely affect perinatal outcomes, and there is a pressing need to investigate this as ART is rapidly scaled up.     

Africa, Europe, Northern America
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TB still responsible for large proportion of admissions and in-patient deaths among people living with HIV

TB as a cause of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ford N, Matteelli A, Shubber Z, Hermans S, Meintjes G, Grinsztejn B, Waldrop G, Kranzer K, Doherty M, Getahun H. J Int AIDS Soc. 2016 Jan 12;19(1):20714. doi: 10.7448/IAS.19.1.20714. eCollection 2016.

Introduction: Despite significant progress in improving access to antiretroviral therapy over the past decade, substantial numbers of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in all regions continue to experience severe illness and require hospitalization. We undertook a global review assessing the proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths because of tuberculosis (TB) in PLHIV.

Methods: Seven databases were searched to identify studies reporting causes of hospitalizations among PLHIV from 1 January 2007 to 31 January 2015 irrespective of age, geographical region or language. The proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality attributable to TB was estimated using random effects meta-analysis.

Results: From an initial screen of 9049 records, 66 studies were identified, providing data on 35 845 adults and 2792 children across 42 countries. Overall, 17.7% (95% CI 16.0 to 20.2%) of all adult hospitalizations were because of TB, making it the leading cause of hospitalization overall; the proportion of adult hospitalizations because of TB exceeded 10% in all regions except the European region. Of all paediatric hospitalizations, 10.8% (95% CI 7.6 to 13.9%) were because of TB. There was insufficient data among children for analysis by region. In-hospital mortality attributable to TB was 24.9% (95% CI 19.0 to 30.8%) among adults and 30.1% (95% CI 11.2 to 48.9%) among children.

Discussion: TB remains a leading cause of hospitalization and in-hospital death among adults and children living with HIV worldwide.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The last 30 years have seen radical improvements in outcomes for many people living with HIV. This study reminds us that in some parts of the world HIV-associated infections, tuberculosis (TB) in particular, still have a devastating effect on thousands of lives.

The importance of TB is widely recognised. WHO aim to reduce deaths due to TB by 75% over the next 10 years.  The question remains: do we really know how many people die due to TB?  Death certification has repeatedly been shown to be unreliable, particularly in the parts of the world where TB is most prevalent. Verbal autopsy is used to estimate cause of death in areas with poor notification systems, but poorly differentiates deaths due to TB and other HIV-associated conditions. Similar challenges are faced when counting and classifying morbidity and hospitalisations. Data are sparse, and determining the cause of an admission is not straightforward, even with access to well-maintained hospital records.  

This review, a sub-analysis of data from a broader study of HIV-associated hospital admissions, is by far the largest of its kind. The authors have been rigorous, given the heterogeneity of the studies included, and their findings are sobering. Among adults living with HIV, in all areas except Europe and South America, TB was the cause of 20-33% of admissions, and some 30% of adults and 45% of children who were admitted with TB were thought to have died from it. These findings are limited by the fact that not all reviewed studies reported on mortality and very few stated how causes of death were assigned.

This paper raises more questions than it answers, but they are important questions.  We are left in no doubt that TB is a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive people, but we need to look closely at how we count and classify ‘TB deaths’ and ‘TB-associated admissions’. The recent systematic review of autopsy studies cited by the authors also found that almost half the TB seen at autopsy was not diagnosed before death. Global autopsy rates are in decline. Without access to more accurate data, how will we know if we’re winning or losing in our efforts to end TB deaths?

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Violence experience of women living with HIV: a global study

Violence. Enough already: findings from a global participatory survey among women living with HIV.

Orza L, Bewley S, Chung C, Crone ET, Nagadya H, Vazquez M, Welbourn A. J Int AIDS Soc. 2015 Dec 1;18(6 Suppl 5):20285. doi: 10.7448/IAS.18.6.20285. eCollection 2015.

Introduction: Women living with HIV are vulnerable to gender-based violence (GBV) before and after diagnosis, in multiple settings. This study's aim was to explore how GBV is experienced by women living with HIV, how this affects women's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and human rights (HR), and the implications for policymakers.

Methods: A community-based, participatory, user-led, mixed-methods study was conducted, with women living with HIV from key affected populations. Simple descriptive frequencies were used for quantitative data. Thematic coding of open qualitative responses was performed and validated with key respondents.

Results: In total, 945 women living with HIV from 94 countries participated in the study. Eighty-nine percent of 480 respondents to an optional section on GBV reported having experienced or feared violence, either before, since and/or because of their HIV diagnosis. GBV reporting was higher after HIV diagnosis (intimate partner, family/neighbours, community and health settings). Women described a complex and iterative relationship between GBV and HIV occurring throughout their lives, including breaches of confidentiality and lack of SRH choice in healthcare settings, forced/coerced treatments, HR abuses, moralistic and judgemental attitudes (including towards women from key populations), and fear of losing child custody. Respondents recommended healthcare practitioners and policymakers address stigma and discrimination, training, awareness-raising, and HR abuses in healthcare settings.

Conclusions: Respondents reported increased GBV with partners and in families, communities and healthcare settings after their HIV diagnosis and across the life-cycle. Measures of GBV must be sought and monitored, particularly within healthcare settings that should be safe. Respondents offered policymakers a comprehensive range of recommendations to achieve their SRH and HR goals. Global guidance documents and policies are more likely to succeed for the end-users if lived experiences are used.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: Violence against women who are living with HIV is common globally. This paper reports on a study of 832 women living with HIV from 94 countries who participated in an online survey, recruited through a non-random snowball sampling model. The survey comprised quantitative and qualitative (free text) components. Participants included women who had ever or were currently using injection drugs (14%), who had ever or were currently selling sex (14%), and who had ever or were currently homeless (14%). Lifetime experience of violence among respondents was high (86%). Perpetrators included: intimate partner (59%), family member / neighbour (45%), community member (53%), health care workers (53%) and police, military, prison or detention services (17%). Findings suggest that violence is not a one off occurrence and cannot easily be packaged as a cause or a consequence of HIV. Instead violence occurs throughout women’s lives, takes multiple forms, and has a complex and iterative relationship with HIV.

The study population did not represent all women living with HIV, and was biased towards women with internet access who have an activist interest. Nonetheless, the study provides further evidence of the breadth and frequency of gender based violence experienced by women living with HIV. Key recommendations for policy makers include training of health care workers working in sexual and reproductive services to offer non-discriminatory services to women living with HIV and to effectively respond to disclosures of gender based violence (such as intimate partner violence) as part of the package of care.

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Togo, Transdniestria, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
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AIDS and bacterial disease remain leading causes of hospital admission

Causes of hospital admission among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ford N, Shubber Z, Meintjes G, Grinsztejn B, Eholie S, Mills EJ, Davies MA, Vitoria M, Penazzato M, Nsanzimana S, Frigati L, O'Brien D, Ellman T, Ajose O, Calmy A, Doherty M. Lancet HIV. 2015 Oct;2(10):e438-44. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(15)00137-X. Epub 2015 Aug 11.

Background: Morbidity associated with HIV infection is poorly characterised, so we aimed to investigate the contribution of different comorbidities to hospital admission and in-hospital mortality in adults and children living with HIV worldwide.

Methods: Using a broad search strategy combining terms for hospital admission and HIV infection, we searched MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, LILACS, AIM, IMEMR and WPIMR from inception to Jan 31, 2015, to identify studies reporting cause of hospital admission in people living with HIV. We focused on data reported after 2007, the period in which access to antiretroviral therapy started to become widespread. We estimated pooled proportions of hospital admissions and deaths per disease category by use of random-effects models. We stratified data by geographical region and age.

Findings: We obtained data from 106 cohorts, with reported causes of hospital admission for  313 006 adults and 6182 children living with HIV. For adults, AIDS-related illnesses (25 119 patients, 46%, 95% CI 40-53) and bacterial infections (14 034 patients, 31%, 20-42) were the leading causes of hospital admission. These two categories were the most common causes of hospital admission for adults in all geographical regions and the most common causes of mortality. Common region-specific causes of hospital admission included malnutrition and wasting, parasitic infections, and haematological disorders in the Africa region; respiratory disease, psychiatric disorders, renal disorders, cardiovascular disorders, and liver disease in Europe; haematological disorders in North America; and respiratory, neurological, digestive and liver-related conditions, viral infections, and drug toxicity in South and Central America. For children, AIDS-related illnesses (783 patients, 27%, 95% CI 19-34) and bacterial infections (1190 patients, 41%, 26-56) were the leading causes of hospital admission, followed by malnutrition and wasting, haematological disorders, and, in the African region, malaria. Mortality in individuals admitted to hospital was 20% (95% CI 18-23, 12 902 deaths) for adults and 14% (10-19, 643 deaths) for children.

Interpretation: This review shows the importance of prompt HIV diagnosis and treatment, and the need to reinforce existing recommendations to provide chemoprophylaxis and vaccination against major preventable infectious diseases to people living with HIV to reduce serious AIDS and non-AIDS morbidity.

Abstract access 

Editor’s notes: Despite the widening availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-associated disease remains an important cause of illness and death. In this systematic review the authors summarise published data concerning causes of hospital admission among HIV-positive people since 2007. This date was selected on the basis that access to ART was limited prior to 2007.

Overall the most common causes of admission among adults, across all geographical regions, were AIDS-associated illness and bacterial infections. Tuberculosis was the most common cause among adults, accounting for 18% of all admissions, followed by bacterial pneumonia (15%). Among children, similarly AIDS-associated illnesses (particularly tuberculosis and Pneumocystis pneumonia) and bacterial infections were the most common causes of admission. Among the 20% of adults who died during their admission, the most common causes of death were tuberculosis, bacterial infections, cerebral toxoplasmosis and cryptococcal meningitis. Among children the most common causes of death were tuberculosis, bacterial infections and Pneumocystis pneumonia. Tuberculosis is likely to have been underestimated in these studies. Autopsy studies consistently illustrate that around half of HIV-positive people who have tuberculosis identified at autopsy had not been diagnosed prior to death.

The review highlights that the majority of severe HIV-associated disease remains attributable to advanced immunosuppression. This is reflected by a median CD4 count at admission among adults of 168 cells per µl. Some 30% of people first tested HIV positive at the time of the admission. The review underlines the need to promote HIV testing so that HIV-positive people can access ART, and prevent the complications of advanced HIV disease. It also underscores the need for better coverage of screening for tuberculosis and preventive therapy for people without active disease.  

Avoid TB deaths
Comorbidity, Epidemiology
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PrEP is effective in a real world setting

Pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent the acquisition of HIV-1 infection (PROUD): effectiveness results from the pilot phase of a pragmatic open-label randomised trial.

McCormack S, Dunn DT, Desai M, Dolling DI, Gafos M, Gilson R, Sullivan AK, Clarke A, Reeves I, Schembri G, Mackie N, Bowman C, Lacey CJ, Apea V, Brady M, Fox J, Taylor S, Antonucci S, Khoo SH, Rooney J, Nardone A, Fisher M, McOwan A, Phillips AN, Johnson AM, Gazzard B, Gill ON. Lancet. 2015 Sep 9. pii: S0140-6736(15)00056-2. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00056-2. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Randomised placebo-controlled trials have shown that daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with tenofovir-emtricitabine reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, this benefit could be counteracted by risk compensation in users of PrEP. We did the PROUD study to assess this effect.

Methods: PROUD is an open-label randomised trial done at 13 sexual health clinics in England. We enrolled HIV-negative gay and other men who have sex with men who had had anal intercourse without a condom in the previous 90 days. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive daily combined tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (245 mg) and emtricitabine (200 mg) either immediately or after a deferral period of 1 year. Randomisation was done via web-based access to a central computer-generated list with variable block sizes (stratified by clinical site). Follow-up was quarterly. The primary outcomes for the pilot phase were time to accrue 500 participants and retention; secondary outcomes included incident HIV infection during the deferral period, safety, adherence, and risk compensation. The trial is registered with ISRCTN (number ISRCTN94465371) and ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02065986).

Findings: We enrolled 544 participants (275 in the immediate group, 269 in the deferred group) between Nov 29, 2012, and April 30, 2014. Based on early evidence of effectiveness, the trial steering committee recommended on Oct 13, 2014, that all deferred participants be offered PrEP. Follow-up for HIV incidence was complete for 243 (94%) of 259 patient-years in the immediate group versus 222 (90%) of 245 patient-years in the deferred group. Three HIV infections occurred in the immediate group (1.2/100 person-years) versus 20 in the deferred group (9.0/100 person-years) despite 174 prescriptions of post-exposure prophylaxis in the deferred group (relative reduction 86%, 90% CI 64-96, p=0.0001; absolute difference 7.8/100 person-years, 90% CI 4.3-11.3). 13 men (90% CI 9-23) in a similar population would need access to 1 year of PrEP to avert one HIV infection. We recorded no serious adverse drug reactions; 28 adverse events, most commonly nausea, headache, and arthralgia, resulted in interruption of PrEP. We detected no difference in the occurrence of sexually transmitted infections, including rectal gonorrhoea and chlamydia, between groups, despite a suggestion of risk compensation among some PrEP recipients.

Interpretation: In this high incidence population, daily tenofovir-emtricitabine conferred even higher protection against HIV than in placebo-controlled trials, refuting concerns that effectiveness would be less in a real-world setting. There was no evidence of an increase in other sexually transmitted infections. Our findings strongly support the addition of PrEP to the standard of prevention for men who have sex with men at risk of HIV infection.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Editor’s notes: The PROUD study was an open label pragmatic randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effectiveness of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in gay men and other men who have sex with men and whether the benefits are counteracted by risk compensation in users of PrEP. During the pilot phase of the study to test the feasibility of a large-scale trial the investigators found an unexpectedly high incidence of HIV infections. It was seven times higher than the national estimate reported for gay men and other men who have sex with men in the UK. The incidence of HIV infection was significantly lower in the group assigned to receive PrEP immediately, compared with the group assigned to receive it after a deferral period of one year. Moreover the reduction in HIV incidence was greater than has been observed in placebo-controlled trials. As a result the trial was stopped early on the recommendation of the trial steering committee. The high incidence of HIV suggests that, despite the broad eligibility criteria, the study population was highly selective and that the offer of PrEP attracted men who were at high risk of HIV and most likely to benefit from it. Despite some limitations, for example, lack of data on adherence and sexual behaviour, the results of this study are encouraging and have important implication for HIV prevention. They indicate that PrEP is effective in a real world setting, particularly in a population that is aware of its risk of HIV infection. Furthermore, there was no evidence of risk compensation among PrEP recipients. 

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When to switch to second-line ART in children?

HIV-1 drug resistance and second-line treatment in children randomized to switch at low versus higher RNA thresholds.

Harrison L, Melvin A, Fiscus S, Saidi Y, Nastouli E, Harper L, Compagnucci A, Babiker A, McKinney R, Gibb D, Tudor-Williams G; PENPACT-1 (PENTA 9PACTG 390) Study Team. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Sep 1;70(1):42-53. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000671.

Background: The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold.

Methods: PENPACT-1 had a 2 x 2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based ART, and switch at a 1000 copies/mL versus 30 000 copies/mL threshold. Switch criteria were not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or Center for Disease Control and Prevention stage C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000 copies/mL before switch, resuppression, and at 4-years/trial end.

Results: Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000 copies/mL (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30 000 copies/mL (PI-30 000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000 copies/mL (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30 000 copies/mL (NNRTI-30 000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000 copies/mL switch criteria during 5-year follow-up. In 30 000 copies/mL threshold arms, median time from 1000 to 30 000 copies/mL switch criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P = 0.81). In NNRTI-30 000, more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000 copies/mL (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30 000). Sixty-two children started abacavir + lamivudine, 166 lamivudine + zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir + lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30 000, 64% NNRTI-1000, and 100% NNRTI-30 000 were <400 copies/mL 24 weeks later.

Conclusions: Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet resuppressed on second-line. An abacavir + lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance.

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Editor’s notes: Paediatric guidelines recommend that children living with HIV initiate ART early in life. Therefore duration of treatment is likely to be for several decades in children. Children have tended to be maintained on failing therapies longer than adults due to limited treatment options, particularly in resource-limited settings.

The PENPACT-1 trial compared two HIV viral load thresholds, <1000 and <30 000 copies/ml, for switching to second-line ART among children taking non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or protease inhibitor (PI)-based first-line regimens. As expected, children starting NNRTIs as their first-line regimen developed more NRTI mutations than children starting on boosted PIs. Importantly, children switching to second line ART at the higher viral load threshold were much more likely to develop resistance if they were taking NNRTI as their first line regimen than if they were taking boosted PIs. The study highlights the more “forgiving” nature of the PI drug class in terms of development of drug resistance. The main implication of this finding is that delayed switching on PI-based ART is a safe option in settings where future drug options are limited, as the risk of development of clinically significant PI or NRTI mutations is low. Interestingly, use of an abacavir + lamivudine nucleoside backbone resulted in fewer thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) than use of lamivudine + zidovudine or stavudine backbone. This finding was based on analysis of non-randomised data, but supports the current WHO recommendations to use abacavir as the first-line drug of choice in the NRTI backbone.

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