Articles tagged as "HIV testing and treatment"

Improving access to HIV testing—still the most important step to improve the lives of people living with HIV?

Editor’s notes: The target for HIV testing is very clear and well understood as the first 90 in the UNAIDS treatment targets. However, estimating the proportion of people living with HIV who know their status is not completely straightforward.  UNAIDS uses various data sources and a well described algorithm to make its annual estimates.  For some countries, population based surveys allow a random sample of the population to be interviewed and tested for HIV.  Nonetheless, such surveys only occur periodically and so data may be out of date.  People who were HIV-negative a few years ago may now be HIV positive and people who know that they were tested a few years ago and think that they know their status may in fact have acquired HIV in the meantime.  Staveteig and colleagues have used the most recent demographic and health surveys from 16 countries in sub-Saharan Africa to estimate the first 90 and to analyse the demographic characteristics associated with knowing one’s HIV status.  The authors discuss some of the challenges in the assumptions needed for this estimation process.  However, the surveys had excellent participation and a high rate of acceptance of HIV testing, so that out of more than 14 000 people living with HIV across the countries, the authors are able to state that 54% know their status.  The proportion in different countries ranges from 26% in Sierra Leone to 84% in Rwanda.  Their analysis does not present very surprising associations.  We have come to expect that men, young people and those with less than primary education are found to be less likely to know their status.  However, the study provides a direct estimate from survey data and as such helps to triangulate with other estimates from the region.

In general, the West and Central African region lags behind the East and Southern African region when it comes to access to HIV testing, linkage to treatment and viral suppression.  A catch-up plan has been developed and endorsed at high level political meetings in most countries in the region. The study by Inghels and colleagues from Côte d’Ivoire is therefore important.  They demonstrate that among 273 people recently diagnosed with HIV at the blood donors’ centre, almost half could have been diagnosed up to five years earlier if health care staff had followed guidelines to propose testing for indicator clinical conditions such as extreme weight loss, repeated fevers or shingles.  Approximately a quarter of people recently diagnosed with HIV had recognized risk factors for HIV (apart from their clinical presentation), but only approximately one-sixth, a small minority, of people had mentioned it to their heathcare professional.  If we are to catch up and ensure that 90% of people living with HIV have known their status by 2020, we need to maximize efforts to use a full range of differentiated HIV testing approaches.  Health care staff must offer HIV tests routinely to people with clinical indicator conditions. Staff at all levels of the health system must also promote an environment in which people with risk behaviours for HIV infection feel comfortable to be able to raise it and discuss it.

Reaching the 'first 90': gaps in coverage of HIV testing among people living with HIV in 16 African countries.

Staveteig S, Croft TN, Kampa KT, Head SK. PLoS One. 2017 Oct 12;12(10):e0186316. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0186316. eCollection 2017.

Background: UNAIDS has recently proposed a set of three ambitious targets that, if achieved, are predicted to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. The targets, known as 90-90-90, call for 90% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) to know their status, 90% of PLHIV to receive antiretroviral therapy, and 90% of those on antiretroviral therapy to achieve viral suppression by the year 2020. We examine the first of these targets, focusing on sub-Saharan Africa, the region of the world most affected by HIV, to measure the proportion of PLHIV estimated to know their HIV status, and to identify background and behavioral characteristics significantly associated with gaps in ever testing among PLHIV.

Methods and findings: We analyze cross-sectional population-based data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and AIDS Indicator Surveys (AIS) fielded since 2010 in 16 sub-Saharan African countries where voluntary serological testing was recently conducted: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Cote d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gabon, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Survey response rates averaged 95.0% (range 89.3-99.5%), while consent to serotesting averaged 94.9% (range 88.7-99.6%). This study, which includes more than 14 000 respondents living with HIV, finds that 69% of PLHIV in the average study country have ever been tested for HIV (range 34-95%). Based on timing of the last test and on ART coverage, we estimate that 54% of PLHIV in the average country are aware of their status (range 26-84%). Adjusted logistic regression finds that men (median adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.38), adults with less than primary education (median AOR = 0.31), and adolescents (median AOR = 0.32) are consistently less likely to have ever been tested for HIV than women, adults with secondary and above education, and adults age 30-39, respectively. In most countries unadjusted logistic regression also finds significant gaps in testing among the poorest groups and those reporting never having had sex.

Conclusion: The fact that an average of 54% of PLHIV in these 16 countries are estimated to know their status reflects encouraging progress. However, not only is this average far short of the 90% target set by UNAIDS for 2020, but it also implies that in the average study country nearly one-half of PLHIV are unable to access lifesaving care and treatment because they are unaware that they are HIV-positive. Several gaps in HIV testing coverage exist, particularly among adolescents, the least educated, and men. While the need to target demographic groups at greatest risk of HIV continues, additional interventions focused on reaching men and on reaching socially vulnerable populations such as adolescents, the poorest, and the least educated are essential.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Missed opportunities for HIV testing among newly diagnosed HIV-infected adults in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.

Inghels M, Niangoran S, Minga A, Yoboue JM, Dohoun L, Yao A, Eholié S, Anglaret X, Danel C. PLoS One. 2017 Oct 4;12(10):e0185117. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0185117. eCollection 2017

Background: HIV testing is crucial for starting ART earlier in HIV-infected people. We describe Missed Opportunities (MO) for HIV testing among adults newly diagnosed with HIV in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.

Methods: Between April 2nd 2013 and April 1st 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among all adults newly diagnosed (< 1year) for HIV at the Blood Donors Medical Center of Abidjan with face to face questionnaire. An MO for HIV testing was defined as a medical consultation for a clinical indicator (e.g. symptoms, hospitalization, and pregnancy) or a non-clinical indicator (e.g. high-risk sexual behavior, HIV-infected partner) potentially related to an HIV infection but did not lead to HIV test proposal by a health care professional.

Results: Of the 341 patients who attended the center during this period, 273 (157 women and 116 men) were included in this analysis. 130 (47.6%) reported at least one medical consultation for an indicator relevant for a test proposal between 1 month and five years prior to their diagnosis. Among them, 92 (77.3%) experienced at least one MO for testing. The 273 included patients reported a total of 216 indicators; 146 (67.6%) were reported without test proposal and thus were MO. Hospitalization, extreme loss of weight, chronic or repeat fever and herpes zoster were the indicators with the largest number of MO. While 66 (24.2%) patients experienced non-clinical indicators relevant to risk of HIV infection, only 11 (4.0%) mentioned it to a health professional.

Conclusion: MO for HIV testing are frequent, even in situations for which testing is clearly recommended. Better train healthcare professionals and creating new opportunities of testing inside and, outside of medical settings are crucial to improve HIV control.

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Africa
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Despite better access to HIV treatment we need stronger evidence based guidance on treating people with serious complications of advanced HIV infection

Editor’s notes: The emphasis for scaling up HIV treatment usually focuses on outpatient and primary care clinics with increasing decentralization to the community.  It is therefore sobering to see the results of a randomized trial conducted at a national referral hospital in Zambia.  Andrews and colleagues report on 209 adults admitted to hospital with sepsis and hypotension, a combination referred to as septic shock.  Several important points emerge.  Almost 90% of patients admitted with this serious condition were HIV-positive.  Most had only been diagnosed with HIV infection in the last three months, and approximately half were taking ART.  The median CD4 count was only 70 cells per microlitre. Almost half had a history of having tuberculosis and one quarter were currently on anti-tuberculosis treatment at the time of admission to hospital. Most were also anaemic, with an average haemoglobin of 7.8 g/dl. Mortality from septic shock has been falling in Europe and the United States of America largely due to more intensive management of intravenous fluids and blood pressure.  The focus has been on strict protocols to ensure that all patients get the best treatment. However, there has been debate about the best approach to take when less sophisticated monitoring and supportive technology such as artificial ventilation is not available. In this Zambian tertiary hospital setting, only one patient was able to be managed in the intensive care unit due to resource constraints.  Patients were randomized to receive a protocolized intensive fluid and blood pressure resuscitation or to receive the more standard care with the responsible physicians making the decisions.  The death rate from this severe condition was very high.  85 of the 209 patients randomized died.  However, despite receiving more intravenous fluids, more blood transfusions and more drugs to raise blood pressure, the outcomes were worse in the group treated according to the protocol with 48% mortality compared to 33% in the standard care arm.  As always, the lesson is that many of these deaths could have been avoided if we were able to diagnose, link and treat people living with HIV much earlier in the course of their infection.  However, there is also an important caution that treatments that make good sense and seem the best course of action may in fact make the situation worse, even if the same treatments have been shown in other contexts to be beneficial.  Such information will only come from randomized trials, and the authors should be congratulated for being bold enough to conduct a high-quality study that should make us reflect on our preconceptions about how best to treat seriously ill patients in resource poor settings.

Andrade and colleagues have reviewed the literature in order to determine the best approach to treating critically unwell people living with HIV who are admitted to intensive care units.  They examined whether starting ARVs while the person was already critically ill was associated with better outcomes.  Patients in intensive care may already have many different medicines, as well as altered metabolism.  In addition, ARVs can provoke immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes that have been shown to make outcomes worse in some serious conditions such as cryptococcal meningitis.  On the other hand, the evidence from patients with tuberculosis is clear – starting ARVs as soon as possible is associated with better outcomes.  In this review and meta-analysis, there was a clear short-term advantage to starting ARVs while the patient was still in intensive care.  The data were not sufficient to tell whether the longer-term outcome as also improved by the earlier start of ART.  One limitation is that all the studies reviewed were observational, and the decision to start ARVs was not randomized, so that it is plausible that clinicians may have started ARVs more willingly in those patients who were most likely to survive.  Nonetheless, in the absence of randomized trials, this study makes a strong case for starting ARVs promptly even in the sickest patients.

Effect of an early resuscitation protocol on in-hospital mortality among adults with sepsis and hypotension: a randomized clinical trial.

Andrews B, Semler MW, Muchemwa L, Kelly P, Lakhi S, Heimburger DC, Mabula C, Bwalya M, Bernard GR. JAMA. 2017 Oct 3;318(13):1233-1240. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.10913.

Importance: The effect of an early resuscitation protocol on sepsis outcomes in developing countries remains unknown.

Objective: To determine whether an early resuscitation protocol with administration of intravenous fluids, vasopressors, and blood transfusion decreases mortality among Zambian adults with sepsis and hypotension compared with usual care.

Design, setting, and participants: Randomized clinical trial of 212 adults with sepsis (suspected infection plus ≥2 systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria) and hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg or mean arterial pressure ≤65 mm Hg) presenting to the emergency department at a 1500-bed referral hospital in Zambia between October 22, 2012, and November 11, 2013. Data collection concluded December 9, 2013.

Interventions: Patients were randomized 1:1 to either (1) an early resuscitation protocol for sepsis (n = 107) that included intravenous fluid bolus administration with monitoring of jugular venous pressure, respiratory rate, and arterial oxygen saturation and treatment with vasopressors targeting mean arterial pressure (≥65 mm Hg) and blood transfusion (for patients with a hemoglobin level <7 g/dL) or (2) usual care (n = 105) in which treating clinicians determined hemodynamic management.

Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and the secondary outcomes included the volume of intravenous fluid received and receipt of vasopressors.

Results: Among 212 patients randomized to receive either the sepsis protocol or usual care, 3 were ineligible and the remaining 209 completed the study and were included in the analysis (mean [SD] age, 36.7 [12.4] years; 117 men [56.0%]; 187 [89.5%] positive for the human immunodeficiency virus). The primary outcome of in-hospital mortality occurred in 51 of 106 patients (48.1%) in the sepsis protocol group compared with 34 of 103 patients (33.0%) in the usual care group (between-group difference, 15.1% [95% CI, 2.0%-28.3%]; relative risk, 1.46 [95% CI, 1.04-2.05]; P = .03). In the 6 hours after presentation to the emergency department, patients in the sepsis protocol group received a median of 3.5 L (interquartile range, 2.7-4.0 L) of intravenous fluid compared with 2.0 L (interquartile range, 1.0-2.5 L) in the usual care group (mean difference, 1.2 L [95% CI, 1.0-1.5 L]; P < .001). Fifteen patients (14.2%) in the sepsis protocol group and 2 patients (1.9%) in the usual care group received vasopressors (between-group difference, 12.3% [95% CI, 5.1%-19.4%]; P < .001).

Conclusions and relevance: Among adults with sepsis and hypotension, most of whom were positive for HIV, in a resource-limited setting, a protocol for early resuscitation with administration of intravenous fluids and vasopressors increased in-hospital mortality compared with usual care. Further studies are needed to understand the effects of administration of intravenous fluid boluses and vasopressors in patients with sepsis across different low- and middle-income clinical settings and patient populations.

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Highly active antiretroviral therapy for critically ill HIV patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Andrade HB, Shinotsuka CR, da Silva IRF, Donini CS, Yeh Li H, de Carvalho FB, Americano do Brasil PEA, Bozza FA, Miguel Japiassu A. PLoS One. 2017 Oct 24;12(10):e0186968. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0186968. eCollection 2017

Introduction: It is unclear whether the treatment of an HIV infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) affects intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis performed to summarize the effects of HAART on the prognosis of critically ill HIV positive patients.

Materials and methods: A bibliographic search was performed in 3 databases (PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus) to identify articles that investigated the use of HAART during ICU admissions for short- and long-term mortality or survival. Eligible articles were selected in a staged process and were independently assessed by two investigators. The methodological quality of the selected articles was evaluated using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) tool.

Results: Twelve articles met the systematic review inclusion criteria and examined short-term mortality. Six of them also examined long-term mortality (≥90 days) after ICU discharge. The short-term mortality meta-analysis showed a significant beneficial effect of initiating or maintaining HAART during the ICU stay (random effects odds ratio 0.53, p = 0.02). The data analysis of long-term outcomes also suggested a reduced mortality when HAART was used, but the effect of HAART on long-term mortality of HIV positive critically ill patients remains uncertain.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests improved survival rates for HIV positive patients who were treated with HAART during their ICU admission.

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The third 90—ensuring adherence to ART needs approaches tailored to the clinical and social context of individuals

Editor’s notes: The third 90, ensuring that people who are on antiretroviral therapy are supported to adhere well enough to suppress their viral load, is key to preventing drug resistance and to ensuring efficiency of resources as treatment is scaled up to all people living with HIV.  Previous studies have demonstrated how useful SMS reminders can be for many people taking ARV medicines, and this evidence is now incorporated into WHO guidance on ART.  However, a randomized trial by Linnemayr and colleagues among adolescents and young adults in Kampala, Uganda found no benefit after one year of either a weekly reminder or a weekly reminder with the option to respond.  There are no magic bullets to ensure adherence.  SMS reminders may well suit some individuals, whereas others will need different approaches.  The differentiated care approach to ART emphasizes the need to develop the best treatment and support service for each individual, according to their specific social context and clinical situation.

Text messaging for improving antiretroviral therapy adherence: no effects after 1 year in a randomized controlled trial among adolescents and young adults.

Linnemayr S, Huang H, Luoto J, Kambugu A, Thirumurthy H, Haberer JE, Wagner G, Mukasa B. Am J Public Health. 2017 Dec;107(12):1944-1950. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304089. Epub 2017 Oct 19.

Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of Short Message Service (SMS) reminder messages on antiretroviral and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis adherence among HIV-positive youths as well as the relative effectiveness of SMS with and without a response option.

Methods: Eligible HIV-positive patients aged 15 to 22 years at 2 HIV clinics in Kampala, Uganda, participated in a year-long parallel individual-randomized controlled trial and were assigned in a 1-to-1-to-1 ratio to a weekly SMS message group, weekly SMS message with response option group, or a usual-care control group.

Results: We enrolled 332 participants. Electronically measured mean adherence was 67% in the control group, 64% in the 1-way SMS group (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77, 1.14), and 61% in the 2-way SMS group (95% CI = 0.75, 1.12) in an intent-to-treat analysis. Results for secondary outcomes and complete-case analysis were similarly statistically insignificant across groups.

Conclusions: Despite previous evidence that interventions using SMS reminders can promote antiretroviral therapy adherence, this study shows that they are not always effective in achieving behavior change. More research is needed to find out for whom, and under what conditions, they can be beneficial.

Abstract access 

HIV Treatment
Africa
Uganda
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Although people living with HIV should have near normal life expectancy, far too many still die prematurely

Editor’s notes: The scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the most important development in the past decade of the HIV response.  Not only do antiretroviral medicines prevent death and prevent the immune destruction that HIV causes, but they also prevent transmission to sexual partners.  Nonetheless, the challenges of reaching everyone living with HIV are enormous and Young and colleagues’ study from the city of Nairobi highlights that we still have some distance to go.  The authors estimated that 74% of adults living with HIV were receiving ART and among women, the figure was even higher and was estimated to have reached more than the UNAIDs target of 81%.  The authors collected data from the two largest mortuaries in Nairobi, where most deaths that occur in the city are registered.  With approximately 80% of all deaths in the city being registered, the authors believe that their study is reasonably representative of the adult population of the city. They found that among 807 people who died in Nairobi during the recruitment period, HIV was greatly over-represented.  They calculated that around 16% of adult deaths in the city were attributable to HIV, and that, when adjusted for age and sex, death rates among people living with HIV were more than four times higher than the rate among HIV-negative people.  The authors point out that these proportions and rates are much lower than they were at the peak of the epidemic, but they do show that in Nairobi we still have some distance to go to ensure that people living with HIV have the same life expectancy as those who are HIV-negative.

 

HIV-associated mortality in the era of antiretroviral therapy scale-up – Nairobi, Kenya, 2015

Young PW, Kim AA, Wamicwe J, Nyagah L, Kiama C, Stover J, Oduor J, Rogena EA, Walong E, Zielinski-Gutierrez E, Imbwaga A, Sirengo M, Kellogg TA, De Cock KM. PLoS One. 2017 Aug 2;12(8):e0181837. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0181837. eCollection 2017.

Background: Declines in HIV prevalence and increases in antiretroviral treatment coverage have been documented in Kenya, but population-level mortality associated with HIV has not been directly measured. In urban areas where a majority of deaths pass through mortuaries, mortuary-based studies have the potential to contribute to our understanding of excess mortality among HIV-infected persons. We used results from a cross-sectional mortuary-based HIV surveillance study to estimate the association between HIV and mortality for Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya.

Methods and Findings: HIV seropositivity in cadavers measured at the two largest mortuaries in Nairobi was used to estimate HIV prevalence in adult deaths. Model-based estimates of the HIV-infected and uninfected population for Nairobi were used to calculate a standardized mortality ratio and population-attributable fraction for mortality among the infected versus uninfected population. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess sensitivity to epidemiological assumptions. When standardized to the age and sex distribution of expected deaths, the estimated HIV positivity among adult deaths aged 15 years and above in Nairobi was 20.9% (95% CI 17.7-24.6%). The standardized mortality ratio of deaths among HIV-infected versus uninfected adults was 4.35 (95% CI 3.67-5.15), while the risk difference was 0.016 (95% CI 0.013-0.019). The HIV population attributable mortality fraction was 0.161 (95% CI 0.131-0.190). Sensitivity analyses demonstrated robustness of results.

Conclusions: Although 73.6% of adult PLHIV receive antiretrovirals in Nairobi, their risk of death is four-fold greater than in the uninfected, while 16.1% of all adult deaths in the city can be attributed to HIV infection. In order to further reduce HIV-associated mortality, high-burden countries may need to reach very high levels of diagnosis, treatment coverage, retention in care, and viral suppression.

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Africa
Kenya
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Excessive cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV – preventable with better services?

Editor’s notes: Opportunities to prevent mortality among people living with HIV also include careful attention to risk factors for modifiable cardiovascular health risk factors such as smoking, cholesterol levels, weight and exercise.  In an interesting study from Canada, Jeon and colleagues used the Ontario administrative databases to look at differences between 259 475 people being admitted with acute myocardial infarction according to their HIV status.  Overall, people living with HIV who had heart attacks were around 15 years younger and more than twice as likely to die within 30 days following discharge from the hospital compared to HIV-negative people.  This was not because people living with HIV had received care that was obviously different, with similar rates of revascularisation procedures and follow up visits to the cardiology services.  The study highlights the ongoing uncertainty about the reasons for increased morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV.  However, it is clear that we do have several well proven tools with which to reduce cardiovascular morbidity, so we should ensure that they are incorporated into HIV treatment services.

The relationship between known indicators of cardiovascular risk and HIV were also studied in 67 black South Africans living with HIV.  Borkum and colleagues demonstrate that HIV infection in black South Africans living with HIV was generally well controlled with 84% being virally suppressed and that they had a median CD4 count of over 500 cells per microlitre.  Nonetheless, most had a variety of characteristics that suggest that they were at high risk of cardiovascular events.  Markers of inflammation were raised in 68% and “non-dipping” blood pressure, which is a measure of excessive stiffness of the arteries, was present in 65%.  Straightforward measures that could be made even at the most peripheral ART clinic also demonstrated risk, with 67% being classified as overweight and 76% having an increased waist circumference, both well recognized independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.  Worryingly this sample, which was largely female (91%), had an average age of only 42 years.  It is clear that intervention on cardiovascular risks is something for all ART providers to consider in every setting.

The Australian Positive and Peers Longevity Evaluation study (beautifully given the acronym of APPLES) also points out the importance of making valid comparisons between people living with HIV and their HIV negative peers.  In Australia, almost half of all people living with HIV are now over the age of 50 years.  Petoumenos and colleagues show that among gay and bisexual men older than 55 years, recruited in Sydney, those living with HIV were more likely to report noncommunicable comorbidities including heart disease and diabetes. However, some of the more obvious risk factors, such as smoking status, were not different between the groups and people living with HIV drank less alcohol than their HIV negative peers.  The relationships between HIV, lifestyle and noncommunicable disease risk are complex but probably important as the population of people living with HIV continues to age.

In a study from the Cohorte de la Red de Investigación en Sida (CoRIS) in Spain, Masiá and colleagues have also explored long term outcomes of almost 9000 people living with HIV and their experience of non-AIDS defining events.  They show that mortality rates are considerably higher in people living with HIV who have any non-AIDS event, even if these are traditionally considered less severe, such as bacterial pneumonia, psychiatric diseases, bone fractures, or diabetes. In addition to standard indicators (such as low CD4 count at ART initiation), we should take the development of non-AIDS events as a warning to intensify management efforts and more targeted prevention of complications.

In the UK, Molloy and colleagues conducted an audit of clinical services provided at different sites.  They show that systems need to catch up with the changes in life experience of people living with HIV.  While sexual health screening was almost universally available, only 71.4% of sites were able to offer cervical cytology despite the increased risk of cervical cancer in women living with HIV.  Less than half of people taking ART had their risk for cardiovascular disease documented.  Regular audit of appropriate services, even with simple checklists for service providers is a strong tool to improve care for people living with HIV and should have a direct impact on mortality.

 

Mortality and health service use following acute myocardial infarction among persons with HIV: a population-based study

 

Jeon C, Lau C, Kendall CE, Burchell AN, Bayoumi AM, Loutfy M, Rourke SB, Antoniou T. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2017 Sep 14. doi: 10.1089/AID.2017.0128. [Epub ahead of print]

People with HIV have higher rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than HIV-negative individuals. We compared mortality risk and health service use following AMI among people with and without HIV between January 1, 2002, and March 31, 2015. We conducted a population-based study using Ontario's administrative databases. Our primary outcomes were risk of inpatient death and death at 30 days following hospital discharge. In secondary analyses, we compared use of revascularization procedures within 90 days of AMI, as well as readmission or emergency department visits for heart disease and cardiology follow-up within 90 days of discharge. We studied 259 475 AMI patients, of whom 345 (0.13%) were people with HIV. AMI patients with HIV were younger than HIV-negative patients (mean age ± standard deviation: 54.4 ± 10.5 years vs. 69.3 ± 14.3 years). Following multivariable adjustment, the odds ratios for inpatient death and death at 30 days following discharge were 1.04 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.64-1.56] and 2.42 (95% CI 1.00-4.92), respectively. In secondary analyses, no differences were observed in receipt of revascularization procedures (hazard ratio (HR) 0.98; 95% CI 0.85-1.12), readmission or emergency department visit for heart disease (HR 1.18; 95% CI 0.85-1.62), or cardiology follow-up (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.76-1.01). People with HIV experience AMI at younger ages and may be at higher risk of death in the 30 days following hospital discharge, underscoring the importance of targeting modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors in these patients.

Abstract access

High prevalence of "non-dipping" blood pressure and vascular stiffness in HIV-infected South Africans on antiretrovirals

Borkum MS, Heckmann JM, Manning K, Dave JA, Levitt NS, Rayner BL, Wearne N. PLoS One. 2017 Sep 20;12(9):e0185003. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0185003. eCollection 2017.

Background: HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of tissue inflammation and accelerated vascular aging ('inflamm-aging'). Abnormal diurnal blood pressure (BP) rhythms such as non-dipping may contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in HIV infected individuals. However, little data exists on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and measures of vascular stiffness in the black African HIV infected population.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of otherwise well, HIV infected outpatients on ART for >5 years. Study assessments included: 24hr ABP monitoring, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and central aortic systolic pressure (CASP) using a AtCor Medical Sphygmocor device, fasting lipogram, oral glucose tolerance test, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and anthropometric data. Patients completed a questionnaire of autonomic symptoms. CD4+ counts and viral loads were obtained from the National Laboratory results system.

Results: Sixty-seven black participants were included in the analysis of whom 91% (n = 61) were female with a mean age of 42.2 ± 8.6 years. The median duration on ART was 7.5 years (IQR = 6-10), 84% were virally supressed and the median CD4 count was 529.5cells/mm3 (IQR = 372.0-686.5). The majority (67%) were classified as overweight and 76% had an increased waist circumference, yet only 88% of participants were normotensive. A hsCRP level in the high cardiovascular risk category was found in 68% of participants. The prevalence of non-dipping BP was 65%. Interestingly, there was no association on multivariable analysis between dipping status and traditional risk factors for non-dipping BP, such as: obesity, autonomic dysfunction and older age.

Conclusion: This relatively young cross-sectional sample of predominantly normotensive, but overweight black women on effective ART >5 years showed: a high prevalence of non-dipping BP, inflammation and vascular stiffness. Causality cannot be inferred but cardiovascular risk reduction should be emphasized in these patients.  

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Prevalence of self-reported comorbidities in HIV positive and HIV negative men who have sex with men over 55 years—The Australian Positive & Peers Longevity Evaluation Study (APPLES)

Petoumenos K, Huang R, Hoy J, Bloch M, Templeton DJ, Baker D, Giles M, Law MG, Cooper DA. PLoS One. 2017 Sep 8;12(9):e0184583. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184583. eCollection 2017.

In Australia, almost half of HIV-positive people are now aged over 50 and are predominately gay and bisexual men (GBM). Compared to the general HIV-negative population, GBM engage more in behaviours that may increase the risk of age-related comorbidities, including smoking, high alcohol consumption and recreational drug use. The objective of APPLES was to compare comorbidities and risk factors in HIV-positive older GBM with an appropriate control group of HIV-negative GBM. We undertook a prospectively recruited cross-sectional sample of HIV-positive and HIV-negative GBM ≥ 55 years. Detailed data collection included clinic data, a health and lifestyle survey, and blood sample collection. We report key demographic, laboratory markers and self-reported comorbidities by HIV status. For selected comorbidities we also adjust HIV status a priori for age, smoking and body mass index. Over 16 months 228 HIV-positive and 218 HIV-negative men were recruited. Median age was 63 years (IQR: 59-67). Although more HIV-positive men reported having ever smoked, smoking status was not statistically different between HIV positive and HIV negative men (p = 0.081). Greater alcohol use was reported by HIV-negative men (p = 0.002), and recreational drug use reported more often by HIV-positive men (p<0.001). After adjustment, HIV-positive men had significantly increased odds of diabetes (adjusted Odds ratio (aOR): 1.97, p = 0.038), thrombosis (aOR: 3.08, p = 0.007), neuropathy (aOR: 34.6, P<0.001), and non-significantly increased odds for heart-disease (aOR: 1.71, p = 0.077). In conclusion, HIV-positive GBM have significantly increased odds for key self-reported comorbidities. This study underscores the importance of an appropriate HIV-negative control group for more accurate evaluation of the risk and attribution of age-related comorbidities in HIV-positive people.

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Prediction of long-term outcomes of HIV-infected patients developing non-AIDS events using a multistate approach

Masiá M, Padilla S, Moreno S, Barber X, Iribarren JA, Del Romero J, Gómez-Sirvent JL, Rivero M, Vidal F, Campins AA, Gutiérrez F; Cohorte de la Red de Investigación en Sida (CoRIS). PLoS One. 2017 Sep 8;12(9):e0184329. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184329. eCollection 2017.

Objectives: Outcomes of people living with HIV (PLWH) developing non-AIDS events (NAEs) remain poorly defined. We aimed to classify NAEs according to severity, and to describe clinical outcomes and prognostic factors after NAE occurrence using data from CoRIS, a large Spanish HIV cohort from 2004 to 2013.

Design: Prospective multicenter cohort study.

Methods: Using a multistate approach we estimated 3 transition probabilities: from alive and NAE-free to alive and NAE-experienced ("NAE development"); from alive and NAE-experienced to death ("Death after NAE"); and from alive and NAE-free to death ("Death without NAE"). We analyzed the effect of different covariates, including demographic, immunologic and virologic data, on death or NAE development, based on estimates of hazard ratios (HR). We focused on the transition "Death after NAE".

Results: 8789 PLWH were followed-up until death, cohort censoring or loss to follow-up. 792 first incident NAEs occurred in 9.01% PLWH (incidence rate 28.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 26.80-30.84, per 1000 patient-years). 112 (14.14%) NAE-experienced PLWH and 240 (2.73%) NAE-free PLWH died. Adjusted HR for the transition "Death after NAE" was 12.1 (95%CI, 4.90-29.89). There was a graded increase in the adjusted HRs for mortality according to NAE severity category: HR (95%CI), 4.02 (2.45-6.57) for intermediate-severity; and 9.85 (5.45-17.81) for serious NAEs compared to low-severity NAEs. Male sex (HR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.11-3.84), age >50 years (1.78, 1.08-2.94), hepatitis C-coinfection (2.52, 1.38-4.61), lower CD4 cell count at cohort entry (HR 2.49; 95%CI 1.20-5.14 for CD4 cell count below 200 and HR 2.16; 95%CI 1.01-4.66 for CD4 cell count between 200-350, both compared to CD4 cell count higher than 500) and concomitant CD4 <200 cells/mL (2.22, 1.42-3.44) were associated with death after NAE. CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA at engagement, previous AIDS and hepatitis C-coinfection predicted mortality in NAE-free persons.

Conclusion: NAEs, including low-severity events, increase prominently the risk for mortality in PLWH. Prognostic factors differ between NAE-experienced and NAE-free persons. These findings should be taken into account in the clinical management of PLWH developing NAEs and may permit more targeted prevention efforts.

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Routine monitoring and assessment of adults living with HIV: results of the British HIV Association (BHIVA) national audit 2015

Molloy A, Curtis H, Burns F, Freedman A; BHIVA Audit and Standards Sub-Committee. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Sep 13;17(1):619. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2708-y.

Background: The clinical care of people living with HIV changed fundamentally as a result of the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV infection is now a long-term treatable condition. We report a national audit to assess adherence to British HIV Association guidelines for the routine investigation and monitoring of adult HIV-1-infected individuals.

Methods: All UK sites known as providers of adult HIV outpatient services were invited to complete a case-note review and a brief survey of local clinic practices. Participating sites were asked to randomly select 50-100 adults, who attended for specialist HIV care during 2014 and/or 2015. Each site collected data electronically using a self-audit spreadsheet tool. This included demographic details (gender, ethnicity, HIV exposure, and age) and whether 22 standardised and pre-defined clinical audited outcomes had been recorded.

Results: Data were collected on 8258 adults from 123 sites, representing approximately 10% of people living with HIV reported in public health surveillance as attending UK HIV services. Sexual health screening was provided within 96.4% of HIV services, cervical cytology and influenza vaccination within 71.4% of HIV services. There was wide variation in resistance testing across sites. Only 44.9% of patients on ART had a documented 10-year CVD risk within the past three years and fracture risk had been assessed within the past three years for only 16.7% patients aged over 50 years.

Conclusions: There was high participation in the national audit and good practice was identified in some areas. However, improvements can be made in monitoring of cardiovascular risk, bone and sexual health.

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Africa, Europe, Northern America, Oceania
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HIV testing and the HIV epidemic –vitally important to prevent HIV becoming endemic

Editor’s notes: Epidemics refer to situations where the number of infections rises (and subsequently falls) more quickly than might be expected compared to a disease that is endemic.  Endemic implies a stable situation, with natural fluctuations in the number of cases.  Medley and Vassal have written a provocative article in Science that considers how differently individuals, communities and society react to epidemic rather than endemic diseases.  They choose to call HIV in 2017 endemic, which carries a serious risk. As the authors state, “The contained public response, and the concurrent shift of responsibility to individuals to protect themselves from risk, means that endemic disease embeds itself further, as those at risk are often the very same people who do not have the private resources to avoid risk or access treatment.”  There are in fact multiple separate epidemics of HIV in different regions and in different populations.  Some are rising and some are falling. The latest UNAIDS’ report emphasizes the heterogeneity of HIV infections in the world.  New HIV infections have fallen by 29% since 2010 in East and Southern Africa, the region with the highest rates.  On the other hand, new HIV infections have risen by an alarming 60% in Eastern Europe and Central Asia over the same period, albeit from a much lower baseline.  There is widespread political consensus to pursue the UN agenda endorsed at the High Level Meeting on Ending AIDS in New York last year.  Let’s not throw in the towel too soon!

HIV testing services remain central to the HIV strategy and, as usual, this month there are several important papers on aspects of HIV testing, many of which illustrate challenges that need to be overcome.

There are several reasons to encourage people living with HIV to know their status.  First and foremost, we know that the earlier treatment is started in the course of HIV, the better the outlook for the individual.  People who start treatment become much less likely to transmit HIV infection to sexual partners. People who know their HIV status are also able to make informed decisions about their lives and their partnerships.  A study this month by Escudero et al. from New York City used agent-based modelling to understand the testing and care continuum for people who inject drugs. Their results remind us of the key role of HIV testing.  They estimated that 53% of the HIV transmission events from people who inject drugs arose from people who did not know their status, and a further 37% from people who had not been started ART.  In other words, they estimate that only 10-11% of infections from people who inject drugs could be prevented by improving quality of care for people on treatment.  The need to find effective ways to encourage people at risk to know their status and start treatment is stark.

Guanzhou is one of the largest cities in China, with a high population of migrants both national and international.  It is among the most prosperous regions of Guangdong province and has the highest rates of HIV.   Chen et al. added some HIV testing related questions to a wider population based health survey in two districts and showed that approximately a quarter of adults had previously been tested for HIV.  HIV testing was almost all provided through free government facilities or blood transfusion centres.  Despite early steps to make HIV self-testing more available, none of the 666 participants who answered the relevant questions in the survey had used a self-test.  Distance from an HIV testing site was a key determinant of the likelihood of getting tested.  It was not clear that people who might be at higher risk were more likely to be tested, although the numbers and sampling focused on the general population rather than people at special risk.

Wang et al. explored the different HIV test kits used in the first line screening in Xi’an.  In line with Chinese guidelines, but not in line with WHO guidance on HIV testing algorithms for low prevalence settings, they used third- or fourth-generation rapid tests and repeated the positive tests.  WHO’s algorithm for low prevalence settings includes three different rapid tests based on different antigens.   Among 665 people found to be positive on rapid tests, only 559 were confirmed to be HIV-positive by Western blotting.  Subsequent follow up with additional Western blots showed that two of the individuals in whom the first Western blot was indeterminate were seroconverting but the other 104 were HIV-negative and had had false-positive results on the original rapid tests.  False positives were more likely with the fourth-generation test (22% of positive tests) compared to the various third-generation tests used (9-11% of positive tests).  Fourth-generation assays are known to be more sensitive, detecting people with HIV around a week or two earlier in the window period than third-generation assays.  However, the authors point out that in low prevalence settings like Xi’an, the known lack of specificity of fourth-generation assays means that they may not provide sufficient advantages to be used as the first line test.  Overall, the paper emphasizes the importance of using clearly defined algorithms.  The WHO algorithms no longer use Western blots, but do recommend using multiple tests based on different antigens for testing people at low risk of infection, and at least two different tests with different antigens for testing people at high risk of infection.  Everyone should have additional confirmatory tests done prior to starting ART.

Harbertson et al. also focused on the accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests.  They screened samples from 459 military personnel in seven African countries who had reported that they were HIV-positive.  Using the WHO algorithm, they compared the results of quality assured HIV testing to the self-reported HIV status of the participants.  They found that, in different country surveys, between three and 91% of people who said that they were living with HIV were in fact HIV-negative.  The authors point out that several studies have demonstrated the importance of following the WHO guidance, and that the positive predictive value of a test (or algorithm) will always fall as the overall prevalence falls.  They discuss possible limitations such as misunderstanding the question or the terminology used, but discount these possibilities as causing many of the false-positive reports, particularly given the highly variable results across different countries.  There was a strong association between the likelihood of a false positive report and lower education level. People whose understanding of HIV was less good were also more likely to report themselves to be positive falsely.  Overall, the authors assume that quality of testing services needs to be an important priority, while not discounting the challenges of using self-reports to collect information about HIV status.

As more and more people chose to know their HIV status, it may be possible to use routine data from the health service to track the epidemiology of HIV, rather than to use special surveys. Traditionally surveys of antenatal mothers have been used to monitor trends in the HIV epidemic over time.  With the widespread adoption of routine testing for mothers, a large proportion of women have an HIV test.  However, the assays used vary.  For surveillance purposes, samples are often stored and transported as dried blood spots and assays are run in batches using automated ELISA technology.  Routine testing (as discussed above) is often done using an algorithm based on a number of different rapid tests.   Pereira et al. have explored the differences between these approaches among almost 40 000 Brazilian mothers who participated in the antenatal surveillance exercise.  They interviewed mothers and linked their routine ANC results to the surveillance database.  Overall the prevalence of HIV among expectant mothers in Brazil was similar whichever approach was used (0.36% or 0.38%).  However, there were interesting differences.  The performance accuracy in those found positive in the surveillance exercise (which was taken as the gold standard) was only 84% overall and varied between regions from 43% to 100%.  So these 14 false negative results among the 88 individuals who were truly positive were compensated for in the overall prevalence estimates by a similar number (18) of false positive results among around 30 000 individuals who were truly negative. This highlights the challenges of providing accurate results to people in low prevalence settings. The 13% of mothers who slipped through the routine services and were not tested or refused to be tested were significantly more likely to be HIV-positive (0.56%), reinforcing the potential biases involved.  Finding 90% of people living with HIV will require considerable attention to the detail and the quality of HIV testing services.

Adolescents are often a population left behind, and regular reports show that adolescents living with HIV are less likely to know their status or to be on treatment or virally supressed.  Simms et al. used provider initiated testing and counselling (PITC) in primary care clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe.  For two years, the research team supported the routine offer of HIV testing to all six to 15 year olds presenting to seven clinics in a well-defined area of Harare.  The authors then conducted a population-based survey to find out how many eight to 17 year olds (who had had two years of exposure to the intervention) were aware of their status. 141 (2.6%) were living with HIV and more than one-third of these were undiagnosed.  Some had rarely been to the clinic, and others had been taken to the clinic by a guardian who was unable to consent to HIV testing on behalf of the child or the child’s parents.  Others had slipped through the PITC net, possibly because, as Lightfoot et al. in an accompanying comment suggest, providers still find it hard to offer HIV tests to everyone, as they assume that people living with HIV will not appear healthy.  This fits with the researchers’ findings that adolescents living with HIV who were currently healthy, had no skin or other problems and had parents who were alive were less likely to be diagnosed.  Both papers suggest that community based testing is needed to find adolescents. However, this also raises challenges in settings with lower prevalence than the high-density suburbs of Harare chosen for this project.  As prevalence falls lower than the 2.6% observed, a huge testing effort is needed, with attendant costs, but also (as explored above) with the risks of inaccurate results and of the very people that we want to find most, not being around for testing at the right moment. 

 

When an emerging disease becomes endemic.

Medley GF, Vassall A. Science. 2017 Jul 14;357(6347):156-158. doi: 10.1126/science.aam8333.

Epidemics, such as HIV in the early 1980s and Ebola in 2014, inspire decisive government investment and action, and individual and societal concern, sometimes bordering on panic. By contrast, endemic diseases, such as HIV in 2017 and tuberculosis, struggle to maintain the same attention. For many, the paradox is that endemic disease, in its totality, continues to impose a far higher public health burden than epidemic disease. Overall, the swift political response to epidemics has resulted in success. It has proven possible to eradicate epidemic diseases, often without the availability of vaccines and other biomedical technologies. In recent times, only HIV has made the transition from epidemic to endemic, but diseases that have existed for centuries continue to cause most of the infectious disease burden.

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The risk of HIV transmission at each step of the HIV care continuum among people who inject drugs: a modeling study.

Escudero DJ, Lurie MN, Mayer KH, King M, Galea S, Friedman SR, Marshall BL. BMC Public Health. 2017 Jul 25;17(1):614. doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4528-9.

Background: People who inject drugs (PWID) are at continued risk for HIV in the U.S., and experience disparities across the HIV care continuum compared to other high-risk groups. Estimates of the risk of HIV transmission at each stage of the care continuum may assist in identifying public health priorities for averting incident infections among PWID, in addition to transmissions to sexual partners of PWID.

Methods: We created an agent-based model simulating HIV transmission and the HIV care continuum for PWID in New York City (NYC) in 2012. To account for sexual transmission arising from PWID to non-PWID, the simulation included the entire adult NYC population. Using surveillance data and estimates from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system, we simulated a dynamic sexual and injecting network. We estimated the proportion of HIV transmission events attributable to PWID in the following categories, those: without an HIV diagnosis ('Undiagnosed'); diagnosed but not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) ('Diagnosed - not on ART'); those who initiated ART but were not virally suppressed ('Unsuppressed'); and, those who achieved viral suppression ('Suppressed').

Results: We estimated HIV incidence among PWID to be 113 per 100 000 person-years in 2012, with an overall incidence rate for the entire adult NYC population of 33 per 100 000 person-years. Despite accounting for only 33% of the HIV-infected PWID population, the Undiagnosed were associated with 52.6% (95% simulation interval [95% SI]: 47.1-57.0%) of total transmission events. The Diagnosed - not on ART population contributed the second-largest proportion of HIV transmissions, with 36.6% (95% SI: 32.2-41.5%). The Unsuppressed population contributed 8.7% (95% SI: 5.6-11.8%), and Suppressed 2.1% (95% SI: 1.1-3.9%), relatively little of overall transmission.

Conclusion: Among PWID in NYC, more than half (53%) of transmissions were from those who were unaware of their infection status and more than 36% were due to PWID who knew their status, but were not on treatment. Our results indicate the importance of early diagnosis and interventions to engage diagnosed PWID on treatment to further suppress population-level HIV transmission. Future HIV prevention research should focus on the elimination of identified and potential barriers to the testing, diagnosis, and retention of PWID on HIV treatment.

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Is there a relationship between geographic distance and uptake of HIV testing services? A representative population-based study of Chinese adults in Guangzhou, China.

Chen W, Zhou F, Hall BJ, Tucker JD, Latkin C, Renzaho AMN, Ling L. PLoS One. 2017 Jul 20;12(7):e0180801. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180801. eCollection 2017.

Achieving high coverage of HIV testing services is critical in many health systems, especially where HIV testing services remain centralized and inconvenient for many. As a result, planning the optimal spatial distribution of HIV testing sites is increasingly important. We aimed to assess the relationship between geographic distance and uptake of HIV testing services among the general population in Guangzhou, China. Utilizing spatial epidemiological methods and stratified household random sampling, we studied 666 adults aged 18-59. Computer-assisted interviews assessed self-reported HIV testing history. Spatial scan statistic assessed the clustering of participants who have ever been tested for HIV, and two-level logistic regression models assessed the association between uptake of HIV testing and the mean driving distance from the participant's residence to all HIV testing sites in the research sites. The percentage of participants who have ever been tested for HIV was 25.2% (168/666, 95%CI: 21.9%, 28.5%), and the majority (82.7%) of participants tested for HIV in Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, public hospitals or STIs clinics. None reported using self-testing. Spatial clustering analyses found a hotspot included 48 participants who have ever been tested for HIV and 25.8 expected cases (Rate Ratio = 1.86, P = 0.002). Adjusted two-level logistic regression found an inverse relationship between geographic distance (kilometers) and ever being tested for HIV (aOR = 0.90, 95%CI: 0.84, 0.96). Married or cohabiting participants (aOR = 2.14, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.20) and those with greater social support (aOR = 1.04, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.07) were more likely to be tested for HIV. Our findings underscore the importance of considering the geographical distribution of HIV testing sites to increase testing. In addition, expanding HIV testing coverage by introducing non-facility based HIV testing services and self-testing might be useful to achieve the goal that 90% of people living with HIV knowing their HIV status by the year 2020.

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The characteristics of screening and confirmatory test results for HIV in Xi'an, China.

Wang L, Zhou KH, Zhao HP, Wang JH, Zheng HC, Yu Y, Chen W. PLoS One. 2017 Jul 7;12(7):e0180071. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180071. eCollection 2017.

Objectives: Individuals with recent or acute HIV infection are more infectious than those with established infection. Our objective was to analyze the characteristics of detection among HIV infections in Xi'an.

Methods: A 4th-generation kit (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo) and three 3rd-generationEIA kits (WanTai, XinChuang and Livzon) were used for HIV screening. Overall, 665 individuals were identified as positive and were tested by western blotting (WB). The characteristics of the screening and confirmatory tests were analyzed, including the band patterns, the early detection performance and the false-positive rates.

Results: In total, 561 of the 665 patients were confirmed as having HIV-1 infection, and no HIV-2 specific band was observed. Among these 561 WB-positive cases, reactivity to greater than or equal to 9 antigens was the most commonly observed pattern (83.18%), and the absence of reactivity to p17, p31 and gp41 was detected in 6.44%, 5.9% and 2.86% of the cases, respectively. Two cases were positive by the 4th-generation assay but negative by the 3rd-generation assay for HIV screening and had seroconversion. The false-positive rate of the Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo (22.01%) was significantly higher than those of WanTai (9.88%), XinChuang (10.87%) and Livzon (8.93%), p<0.05

Conclusion: HIV infection in Xi'an is mainly caused by HIV-1, and individuals are rarely identified at the early phase. Although the false-positive rate of the 4th-generation assay was higher than that of the 3rd-generation assay, it is still recommended for use as the initial HIV screening test for high-risk individuals. In Xi'an, a 3rd-generation assay for screening could be considered.

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Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

Harbertson J, Hale BR, Tran BR, Thomas AG, Grillo M, Jacobs MB, McAnany J, Shaffer RA. PLoS One. 2017 Jul 7;12(7):e0180796. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180796. eCollection 2017.

HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

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Transitioning from antenatal surveillance surveys to routine HIV testing: a turning point in the mother-to-child transmission prevention programme for HIV surveillance in Brazil.

Pereira GFM, Sabidó M, Caruso A, Benzaken AS. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 5;17(1):469. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2540-4.

Background: In Brazil, due to the rapid increase in programmes for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT), routine programme data are widely available. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of programmatic data to replace HIV surveillance based on the antenatal care (ANC) surveillance survey (SS).

Methods: We analysed ANC SS data from 219 maternity service clinics. PMTCT variables were extracted from the ANC SS data collection form, which allowed us to capture and compare the ANC SS data and PMTCT HIV test results for each pregnant woman who completed the ANC SS. Both the PMTCT programme and the ANC SS tested for HIV using sequential ELISA and western blot for confirmation. We assessed the completeness (% missing) of the PMTC data included in the ANC SS.

Results: Of the 36 713 pregnant women who had ANC SS HIV tests performed, 30 588 also underwent PMTCT HIV testing. The HIV prevalence rate from routine PMTCT testing was 0.36%, compared to 0.38% from the ANC SS testing (relative difference -0.05%; absolute difference -0.02%). The relative difference in prevalence rates between pregnant women in northern Brazil and pregnant women central-west Brazil was -0.98 and 0.66, respectively. Of the 29 856 women who had HIV test results from both the PMTCT and ANC SS, the positive percent agreement of the PMTCT versus the surveillance test was 84.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74.8-91.0), and the negative percent agreement was 99.9% (95% CI: 99.9-100.0). The PMTCT HIV testing uptake was 86.4%. The ANC SS HIV prevalence was 0.33% among PMTCT non-refusers and 0.59% among refusers, with a percent bias of -10.80% and a differential prevalence ratio of 0.56. Syphilis and HIV testing results were complete in 98% and 97.6% of PMTCT reports, respectively. The reported HIV status for the women at clinic entry was missing.

Conclusion: Although there were consistent HIV prevalence estimates from the PMTCT data and the ANC SS, the overall positive percent agreement of 84.1% falls below the World Health Organization benchmark of 94.7%. Therefore, Brazil must continue to reinforce data collection practices and ensure the quality of recently introduced rapid HIV testing before replacing the PMTCT data with surveillance techniques. However, some regions with better results could be prioritized to pilot the use of PMTCT data for surveillance.

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Community burden of undiagnosed HIV infection among adolescents in Zimbabwe following primary healthcare-based provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling: A cross-sectional survey.

Simms V, Dauya E, Dakshina S, Bandason T, McHugh G, Munyati S, Chonzi P, Kranzer K, Ncube G, Masimirembwa C, Thelingwani R, Apollo T, Hayes R, Weiss HA, Ferrand RA. PLoS Med. 2017 Jul 25;14(7):e1002360. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002360. eCollection 2017 Jul.

Background: Children living with HIV who are not diagnosed in infancy often remain undiagnosed until they present with advanced disease. Provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) in health facilities is recommended for high-HIV-prevalence settings, but it is unclear whether this approach is sufficient to achieve universal coverage of HIV testing. We aimed to investigate the change in community burden of undiagnosed HIV infection among older children and adolescents following implementation of PITC in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Methods and Findings: Over the course of 2 years (January 2013-January 2015), 7 primary health clinics (PHCs) in southwestern Harare implemented optimised, opt-out PITC for all attendees aged 6-15 years. In February 2015-December 2015, we conducted a representative cross-sectional survey of 8-17-year-olds living in the 7 communities served by the study PHCs, who would have had 2 years of exposure to PITC. Knowledge of HIV status was ascertained through a caregiver questionnaire, and anonymised HIV testing was carried out using oral mucosal transudate (OMT) tests. After 1 participant taking antiretroviral therapy was observed to have a false negative OMT result, from July 2015 urine samples were obtained from all participants providing OMTs and tested for antiretroviral drugs to confirm HIV status. Children who tested positive through PITC were identified from among survey participants using gender, birthdate, and location. Of 7146 children in 4251 eligible households, 5486 (76.8%) children in 3397 households agreed to participate in the survey, and 141 were HIV positive. HIV prevalence was 2.6% (95% CI 2.2%-3.1%), and over a third of participants with HIV were undiagnosed (37.7%; 95% CI 29.8%-46.2%). Similarly, among the subsample of 2643 (48.2%) participants with a urine test result, 34.7% of those living with HIV were undiagnosed (95% CI 23.5%-47.9%). Based on extrapolation from the survey sample to the community, we estimated that PITC over 2 years identified between 18% and 42% of previously undiagnosed children in the community. The main limitation is that prevalence of undiagnosed HIV was defined using a combination of 3 measures (OMT, self-report, and urine test), none of which were perfect.

Conclusions: Facility-based approaches are inadequate in achieving universal coverage of HIV testing among older children and adolescents. Alternative, community-based approaches are required to meet the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) target of diagnosing 90% of those living with HIV by 2020 in this age group.

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Old fashioned AIDS is still with us – shocking in 2017

Editor’s notes: The term AIDS refers to advanced HIV disease with a CD4 count below 200 cells per microl. or with one of several typical opportunistic infections. It is more than twenty years since the revolutionary discovery of highly active combination antiretroviral therapy.  While deaths due to HIV have fallen steadily over the past two decades, it is shocking that so many people are still dying from AIDS.  In part this is due to the same issues of HIV testing discussed above.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published their most recent report on surveillance in the United States of America (USA).  The authors show very gradual progress in the right direction. But, still more than 20% of people are diagnosed with HIV infection in the USA when they already have AIDS.  In fact, in a further 20% of people, the stage of infection was not reported to CDC, so as a proportion of those with a known stage at diagnosis, as many as one quarter were diagnosed with AIDS. As might be expected, there are disparities between states with District of Columbia and California doing a little better.  There are big disparities by age (with over one third of people diagnosed at age greater than 45 years having AIDS) but surprisingly little difference by ethnicity.

Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) recently released a report highlighting the challenge of advanced disease, which was picked up in a commentary in the British Medical Journal by Cousins.  The report points out that in hospital settings in Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea, Kenya, and Malawi, MSF are still seeing an alarmingly high mortality rate, with one third of deaths occurring within the first 48 hours of admission.  As many as three quarters of the patients had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART), suggesting that their advanced disease was not a consequence of late presentation, but rather of failure of the health system to deliver quality care.  The importance of detecting treatment failure early and changing to effective second (or third) line ART was emphasized.  Once patients do present to hospital with advanced HIV disease, it is a clinical emergency and urgent effective care may make a big difference.  WHO has recently issued guidance on managing advanced HIV disease, and the Journal of the International AIDS Society has recently released a useful supplement on Differentiated Care and HIV.

Back in the USA, Braunstein et al. used existing laboratory and other data to construct a retrospective analysis of what happened in the intervenable period during which different treatment approaches might have prevented more than 11 000 people from dying with HIV between 2007 and 2013.  The intervenable period was defined as the 12 months before the last three months of life.  The authors pointed out that in the last three months of life, people might be in care that was not typical of their engagement during the preceding year.  So the intervenable period is therefore more important to see where change could happen.  Like the MSF team, they found that a substantial proportion of people were not properly treated, as shown by the finding that 60% of people did not have a suppressed viral load in the period analysed.  This was despite 98% having some engagement with the health system as shown by laboratory records, 80% being defined as linked to care, and 76% being prescribed ART. The challenge seemed to be to provide high quality care with continuity of care and decisions made promptly according to the findings in the laboratory.

The package of interventions recommended by WHO in their guidance for people presenting with advanced HIV disease includes screening, treatment and/or prophylaxis for major opportunistic infections, rapid ART initiation and intensified adherence support interventions.  Additional support for this approach comes from the REALITY randomized trial conducted by Hakim and colleagues in Uganda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Kenya.  In this trial, people with advanced HIV infection, judged by their CD4 count, were randomized in a factorial design.  1805 participants were randomized to different ART regimens; to nutritional support or not; and to a package of prophylaxis.  This paper reports on the differences seen according to whether or not participants were randomized to receive the enhanced prophylaxis.  The package consisted of at least 12 weeks of co-trimoxazole (against pneumocystis, malaria, and various bacterial and protozoal infections), co-formulated with isoniazid and pyridoxine (against tuberculosis), along with fluconazole (against cryptococcus, candida and other fungi) also for 12 weeks and azithromycin (against a broader range of invasive bacteria including salmonella) for five days.  The enhanced prophylaxis led to a 27% reduction in mortality six months after entering the study, and there was still a clear difference after one year, by when 127 people had died in the standard of care group compared to 98 in the enhanced prophylaxis group.  Nonetheless, the death rate was still considerable.  It is also worth noting that many of the people in whom the CD4 count was extremely low did not complain of any symptoms.  So CD4 testing is still needed at the point of clinical care to determine who needs urgent differentiated care for advanced HIV infection.

The final paper in this section is a randomised trial from GHESKIO in Haiti (Koenig et al.).  The investigators randomized 701 people diagnosed with HIV, to start ART on the same day as their diagnosis, or to wait for three weeks, as is standard of care at the centre.  12 months later, viral suppression was somewhat better in people who started ART on the same day (61% vs. 52% at a cut-off of 1000 copies per ml.).  The authors point out that this was a single centre study, and results from GHESKIO might not be generalizable to other treatment sites in Haiti.  Although there were still substantial losses to follow up, there was clearly no evidence that the policy to start people on HIV treatment immediately was too hasty.

 

Missed opportunities: adapting the HIV care continuum to reduce HIV-related deaths

Braunstein SL, Robbins RS, Daskalakis DC. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2017 Jul 26. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001509. [Epub ahead of print]

Introduction: With advances in HIV care, persons with HIV/AIDS (PWHA) can lead healthy lives, but avoidable, HIV-related deaths continue to occur in New York City (NYC).

Methods: We selected PWHA from our surveillance registry who died between 2007-2013, resided in NYC, and survived ≥15 months post-diagnosis to generate an HIV Mortality Reduction Continuum of Care (HMRCC) describing pre-death care patterns among PWHA. We used HIV laboratory test reports to measure care outcomes during an "intervenable period" (IP) during which deaths may have been avoided. The continuum was stratified by underlying cause of death (COD) (HIV-related vs. other), and the HIV-related HMRCC was stratified by demographic characteristics.

Results: 11 187 analysis-eligible PWHA died during 2007-2013. 98% linked to care; 80% were retained in care during the IP; 66% were prescribed ART; 47% had VL≤1500 copies/mL; 40% achieved viral suppression (VS). Half (47%) of deaths were HIV-related. Retention was higher among HIV-related COD (83% vs. 78%), but VS was lower (34% vs. 46%). The HIV-related HMRCC revealed disparities in VS. Despite comparable retention rates, Whites had the highest VS (42%, vs. 32% Blacks and 33% Latinos/Hispanics). Additionally, retention and VS increased with increasing age. People with a history of injection drug use had relatively high rates of retention (88%) and VS (37%).

Discussion: The HMRCC is a novel framework for evaluating pre-death care patterns among PWHA and identifying opportunities to reduce preventable deaths. In NYC, reducing mortality will require increasing VS among those already in care, particularly for Blacks and Latinos/Hispanics.

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Enhanced prophylaxis plus antiretroviral therapy for advanced HIV infection in Africa

Hakim J, Musiime V, Szubert AJ, Mallewa J, Siika A, Agutu C, Walker S, Pett SL, Bwakura-Dangarembizi M, Lugemwa A, Kaunda S, Karoney M, Musoro G, Kabahenda S, Nathoo K, Maitland K, Griffiths A, Thomason MJ, Kityo C, Mugyenyi P, Prendergast AJ, Walker AS, Gibb DM; REALITY Trial Team. N Engl J Med. 2017 Jul 20;377(3):233-245. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1615822.

Background: In sub-Saharan Africa, among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the rate of death from infection (including tuberculosis and cryptococcus) shortly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is approximately 10%.

Methods: In this factorial open-label trial conducted in Uganda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Kenya, we enrolled HIV-infected adults and children 5 years of age or older who had not received previous ART and were starting ART with a CD4+ count of fewer than 100 cells per cubic millimeter. They underwent simultaneous randomization to receive enhanced antimicrobial prophylaxis or standard prophylaxis, adjunctive raltegravir or no raltegravir, and supplementary food or no supplementary food. Here, we report on the effects of enhanced antimicrobial prophylaxis, which consisted of continuous trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus at least 12 weeks of isoniazid-pyridoxine (co-formulated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in a single fixed-dose combination tablet), 12 weeks of fluconazole, 5 days of azithromycin, and a single dose of albendazole, as compared with standard prophylaxis (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole alone). The primary end point was 24-week mortality.

Results: A total of 1805 patients (1733 adults and 72 children or adolescents) underwent randomization to receive either enhanced prophylaxis (906 patients) or standard prophylaxis (899 patients) and were followed for 48 weeks (loss to follow-up, 3.1%). The median baseline CD4+ count was 37 cells per cubic millimeter, but 854 patients (47.3%) were asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. In the Kaplan-Meier analysis at 24 weeks, the rate of death with enhanced prophylaxis was lower than that with standard prophylaxis (80 patients [8.9% vs. 108 [12.2%]; hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 0.98; P=0.03); 98 patients (11.0%) and 127 (14.4%), respectively, had died by 48 weeks (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.99; P=0.04). Patients in the enhanced-prophylaxis group had significantly lower rates of tuberculosis (P=0.02), cryptococcal infection (P=0.01), oral or esophageal candidiasis (P=0.02), death of unknown cause (P=0.03), and new hospitalization (P=0.03). However, there was no significant between-group difference in the rate of severe bacterial infection (P=0.32). There were nonsignificantly lower rates of serious adverse events and grade 4 adverse events in the enhanced-prophylaxis group (P=0.08 and P=0.09, respectively). Rates of HIV viral suppression and adherence to ART were similar in the two groups.

Conclusion: Among HIV-infected patients with advanced immunosuppression, enhanced antimicrobial prophylaxis combined with ART resulted in reduced rates of death at both 24 weeks and 48 weeks without compromising viral suppression or increasing toxic effects.

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Same-day HIV testing with initiation of antiretroviral therapy versus standard care for persons living with HIV: A randomized unblinded trial

Koenig SP, Dorvil N, Dévieux JG, Hedt-Gauthier BL, Riviere C, Faustin M, Lavoile K, Perodin C, Apollon A, Duverger L, McNairy ML, Hennessey KA, Souroutzidis A, Cremieux PY, Severe P, Pape JW. PLoS Med. 2017 Jul 25;14(7):e1002357. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002357. eCollection 2017 Jul.

Background: Attrition during the period from HIV testing to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is high worldwide. We assessed whether same-day HIV testing and ART initiation improves retention and virologic suppression.

Methods and Findings: We conducted an unblinded, randomized trial of standard ART initiation versus same-day HIV testing and ART initiation among eligible adults ≥18 years old with World Health Organization Stage 1 or 2 disease and CD4 count ≤500 cells/mm3. The study was conducted among outpatients at the Haitian Group for the Study of Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic infections (GHESKIO) Clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to standard ART initiation or same-day HIV testing and ART initiation. The standard group initiated ART 3 weeks after HIV testing, and the same-day group initiated ART on the day of testing. The primary study endpoint was retention in care 12 months after HIV testing with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml. We assessed the impact of treatment arm with a modified intention-to-treat analysis, using multivariable logistic regression controlling for potential confounders. Between August 2013 and October 2015, 762 participants were enrolled; 59 participants transferred to other clinics during the study period, and were excluded as per protocol, leaving 356 in the standard and 347 in the same-day ART groups. In the standard ART group, 156 (44%) participants were retained in care with 12-month HIV-1 RNA <50 copies, and 184 (52%) had <1000 copies/ml; 20 participants (6%) died. In the same-day ART group, 184 (53%) participants were retained with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml, and 212 (61%) had <1000 copies/ml; 10 (3%) participants died. The unadjusted risk ratio (RR) of being retained at 12 months with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml was 1.21 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.38; p = 0.015) for the same-day ART group compared to the standard ART group, and the unadjusted RR for being retained with HIV-1 RNA <1000 copies was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.31; p = 0.012). The main limitation of this study is that it was conducted at a single urban clinic, and the generalizability to other settings is uncertain.

Conclusions: Same-day HIV testing and ART initiation is feasible and beneficial in this setting, as it improves retention in care with virologic suppression among patients with early clinical HIV disease.

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Technology is advancing rapidly, but are we making the most of it?

Editor’s notes: HIV self-testing was a key area of discussion in the Paris IAS meeting.  UNITAID signed the next phase of the STAR Initiative that is working with six countries in Southern Africa to transform the market for self-testing and understand the impact of different delivery systems.  The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation are using their resources to lower prices of self-test kits.  Following WHO’s decision to prequalify an oral fluid test, many countries are including self-test commodities within their PEPFAR Country Operation Plans and Global Fund concept notes. WHO have issued guidance on self-testing and assisted partner notification. So we can expect to see more and more self-tests out there in the field!

In Malawi, Choko et al. reported on qualitative research done prior to a cluster randomized trial that involves providing self-tests to women attending antenatal care (ANC) for them to take home to their partners.  Although couples are welcomed at ANC clinics and couple testing is certainly beneficial, many men still feel that the clinic is not a place for them.  As one participant said: “Considering what happens here at the ANC clinic, I don’t see my husband escorting me anymore because you find he is alone among many women and he has to listen to some things concerning birth. . . .”

In contrast, many women and men engaged in conversations about how providing self-test kits could help communication, stigma, privacy, control and time pressure among other aspects of involving men in HIV testing.  Some concerns were raised around violence and it is clear that this approach will suit some but not all couples, so it needs to be delivered in a way that respects autonomy with no coercion.

In a very different context, Jamil et al. have conducted a randomized trial among Australian gay men and men who have sex with men.  The trial enrolled “high risk” men who reported multiple partners and condomless sex over the past months.  A central premise of public health strategies to control the HIV epidemic is to find people who have acquired HIV as early as possible.  So the trial aimed to determine whether the offer of free oral fluid self-tests led to earlier testing and more frequent testing.  They found that compared with standard care, availability of free oral-fluid self-testing increased testing frequency both in men who had not tested recently and in men who had not tested at all in the past years. Importantly there was no decline in facility-based testing for HIV or sexually transmitted infections, which might have implied replacement.  The men commented that self-testing was highly acceptable and easy to do.

Self-tests are not a panacea.  Oral fluid tests do have a slightly lower sensitivity than blood based tests.  This may be important when HIV-antibody levels are not high, particularly in people taking ART (either as treatment or as PrEP), or early in the course of infection.  Furthermore, both oral fluid and blood based test rely on visual identification of bands on the test strip that may be faint, leading to some people assuming that they are negative or failing to see the positive band.  Curlin et al. examined the performance of oral fluid tests in people seroconverting to HIV during three specific trials.  They found a considerable number of false negative results and a long delay before some individuals became positive on oral fluid tests.  There was also a clear suggestion that some test operators were less good than others at performing the test and the possibility that one batch of the test kits were less sensitive.  Overall they concluded that “caution must be exercised when interpreting a negative oral fluid test in settings where acute infection is likely, and where PrEP use, ART induced viral suppression, or profound immunosuppression may result in low HIV-specific antibody titers.”  However, as an additional screening tool to be used in populations where many of whom are “missing” from the first 90 are to be found, self-tests have much to offer.  Many of these people will have acquired HIV some time ago and by definition will not be taking ART.  So the cautions raised by Curlin et al. may be less relevant for the primary intended purpose of self-tests.  Nonetheless, they make it very clear that oral fluid self-tests are not an appropriate technology to follow people on treatment or on PrEP.  Nor are they recommended for the diagnosis of acute infection.

While self-tests may increase the proportion of adults knowing their HIV status, different technology is needed for infants.  Nucleic acid amplification is used to detect pro-viral DNA or viral RNA in samples from infants.  The technology is more complex and often centralized, leading to delays and loss to follow up in mother-infant pairs.  Several systems now aim to provide testing close to the point of care and the evaluation of the SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test from Ondiek et al. is an encouraging report.  Sensitivity and specificity were high (98.5% and 99.8% on 745 infant samples) and comparable to the standard approach used in centralized labs.  Samples from those with discrepant results were rechecked by assays based on multiple targets and suggested that the SAMBA test and the standard approach were each responsible for some of the few false positive and negatives seen.  The advantages of the SAMBA system is that it has been designed to be used in peripheral health systems.  All the reagents are freeze dried and stable without refrigeration. Turnaround time is approximately 2 hours with minimal sample handling once the sample is put into the machine.  Costs will still need to come down, but competition with other manufacturers may help.

The SAMBA technology that was evaluated is a qualitative assay aimed at diagnosis of infants.  A larger market is for viral load assays that are central to the monitoring of the effectiveness of HIV treatment and form the indicator for UNAIDS’s third 90.  However, at the moment viral load assays are still too expensive. As a result the optimal strategy for their use remains uncertain within programmes that have to make difficult decisions about where their limited resources should be spent.

Negoescu et al. have built an interesting model to explore the economic trade-offs between different frequencies of performing viral load assays.  More importantly they explore models of adapting the frequency of assays according to characteristics of the person taking ART.  People who have been on treatment for longer periods, or are older, or report fewer problems with adherence could be selected for less frequent assays.  This could save resources, without compromising health outcomes.  However, for countries like Uganda, which was used as the example to calibrate the model, the best approach seems to still be a viral load assay once per year, regardless of other factors.  And indeed, many resource limited countries are having to make difficult choices about how to allocate stretched budgets between expansion of access to viral load assays to the possible detriment of basic prevention programmes such as male circumcision and condoms.  As more resources become available (or as the cost of viral load assays fall) countries may well choose to do more frequent viral load assays.  The authors showed that monthly assays were more expensive but did (unsurprisingly) lead to benefits in terms of earlier detection of virological failure.  Given the renewed attention to drug resistance and the role of late detection of HIV treatment failure in propagating it, such models may become increasingly important.  Adapting the viral load assay frequency to the characteristics of the person taking HIV treatment could be a sensible approach in middle and higher income settings.

For some years, WHO has recommended that nucleic acid amplification should also be used as the first line test for tuberculosis among people living with HIV.  The GeneXpert® system has been taken up quite widely in many countries where HIV is common among people with tuberculosis, most notably in South Africa.  However, Hermans et al. remind us that technology is only one part of the solution.  Although there is no doubt that Xpert is considerably more sensitive than sputum microscopy and considerably quicker than mycobacterial culture, incorporating the technology into routine practice is not always straightforward.  At the Infectious Disease Institute in Kampala, Uganda, where there are well trained clinicians and better resources than in much of the rest of Uganda, Xpert was made available at no cost for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in a one stop combined HIV-TB clinic.  In a cohort of people living with HIV with symptoms suggestive of possible tuberculosis and whose sputum smear microscopy result was negative, many clinicians still preferred to treat on the basis of their clinical judgement and chest radiography.  Xpert™ was requested in less than half the patients.  Similar numbers of people were started on treatment for tuberculosis regardless of whether Xpert was requested (22% vs 21%).  And among those in whom an Xpert™ was performed, more were started on anti-tuberculosis treatment who had had a negative test than a positive one.  So it was not really clear that Xpert was useful in the diagnosis and management of HIV-related tuberculosis in this setting.  Xpert is not 100% sensitive, so many clinicians will choose to treat patients who might have tuberculosis regardless of the results of new technology.  Xpert also give a result that includes resistance to rifampicin, but this was not such a major issue in Kampala and was not an objective of this study.  Those treated without a confirmed test result were more likely to die during the next 12 months, but the authors point out that there are many possible reasons for this.  Many clinicians are aware of the high rates of undiagnosed tuberculosis found at autopsy in people with HIV. Thus, empirical treatment is often given to those who are critically unwell, even when there is no clear evidence of tuberculosis.

GeneXpert® was also the technology used in another study of tuberculosis contact tracing among school children in Swaziland (Ustero et al.).  Despite a rapid and extensive response to look for additional cases in schools where a confirmed case of tuberculosis had been found, no secondary cases were identified.  In household contacts of the same children, they found an additional two cases.  WHO recommends contacts tracing in households of infectious tuberculosis patients.  Although there is still a large and important gap in the estimated number of tuberculosis cases and the number who are notified and treated by national programmes, the best ways to find the missing cases are not well established.  Even in settings where both infections are among the most important causes of mortality, tuberculosis is much less prevalent than HIV.  So the challenge for case-finding and screening approaches for tuberculosis is to select the populations most at risk. An alternative would be to develop tools that are so sensitive, specific and cheap that they can be used for widespread screening. GeneXpert® is not that tool.

While tuberculosis remains the single most important cause of mortality among people living with HIV in low resource settings, there is welcome and increasing attention being paid to human papillomaviruses (HPV).  Certain types of HPV are the cause of cervical cancer.  This is an AIDS-defining illness both because it is more common among women living with HIV and because it has such a high mortality when only detected at the late stages.  At the Paris conference there was a morning session on how to do more about cervical cancer and in particular how to build on the synergies of both HPV and HIV programmes to provide more integrated services for women who are at risk of both infections.  The most important types of HPV that cause cervical cancer can be prevented by vaccination.  However, to be most effective the vaccine has to be given prior to becoming infected with the relevant HPV strain.  So the study by Sudenga et al. in South Africa is useful as it demonstrates how many younger women aged 16-24 years in the Western Cape Province had antibodies against four of the important types included in the quadrivalent vaccine that they were testing.  The majority of participants (64%) had antibodies to two or more types present at enrolment and 12% had antibodies to all four.  Furthermore, among those participants who received placebo injections, the seroconversion rates were alarming high at 23% for HPV16 and 5% for HPV6 over the 7 months of the study among baseline seronegative participants.  South Africa has been a leader in the region in HPV vaccination for schoolgirls.  It is clear that vaccination needs to happen at a young enough age to catch most girls before they become sexually active.  This is in contrast to the offer of pre-exposure prophylaxis, which should be focused on young women who are already sexually active and at higher risk of acquiring HIV.  The specificities of synergies and integration need to be clearly delineated if we are to maximize efficiency.

HPV is also the principal cause of anal carcinoma, which is a significant problem among gay men and men who have sex with men.  Jin et al. have been building on the progress in cervical cancer screening, where new technologies such as nucleic acid detection or oncoprotein detection are leading to big improvements in some settings and replacing cytology as the first line screen for women.  The authors determined whether similar biomarkers including both nucleic acids and cellular markers could be used instead of anal cytology.  As with most advances in diagnostic technology, there is a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity.  Tests that do not miss any cases of neoplastic change are also likely to lead to many people being unnecessarily referred for further assessment and treatment.  However, both new approaches seem to be able to be calibrated in this Australian population to allow fewer referrals while still maintaining a similar sensitivity to the current cytological approach.

Acceptability of woman-delivered HIV self-testing to the male partner, and additional interventions: a qualitative study of antenatal care participants in Malawi.

Choko AT, Kumwenda MK, Johnson CC, Sakala DW, Chikalipo MC, Fielding K, Chikovore J, Desmond N, Corbett EL. J Int AIDS Soc. 2017 Jun 26;20(1):1-10. doi: 10.7448/IAS.20.1.21610.

Introduction: In the era of ambitious HIV targets, novel HIV testing models are required for hard-to-reach groups such as men, who remain underserved by existing services. Pregnancy presents a unique opportunity for partners to test for HIV, as many pregnant women will attend antenatal care (ANC). We describe the views of pregnant women and their male partners on HIV self-test kits that are woman-delivered, alone or with an additional intervention.

Methods: A formative qualitative study to inform the design of a multi-arm multi-stage cluster-randomized trial, comprised of six focus group discussions and 20 in-depth interviews, was conducted. ANC attendees were purposively sampled on the day of initial clinic visit, while men were recruited after obtaining their contact information from their female partners. Data were analysed using content analysis, and our interpretation is hypothetical as participants were not offered self-test kits.

Results: Providing HIV self-test kits to pregnant women to deliver to their male partners was highly acceptable to both women and men. Men preferred this approach compared with standard facility-based testing, as self-testing fits into their lifestyles which were characterized by extreme day-to-day economic pressures, including the need to raise money for food for their household daily. Men and women emphasized the need for careful communication before and after collection of the self-test kits in order to minimize the potential for intimate partner violence although physical violence was perceived as less likely to occur. Most men stated a preference to first self-test alone, followed by testing as a couple. Regarding interventions for optimizing linkage following self-testing, both men and women felt that a fixed financial incentive of approximately USD$2 would increase linkage. However, there were concerns that financial incentives of greater value may lead to multiple pregnancies and lack of child spacing. In this low-income setting, a lottery incentive was considered overly disappointing for those who receive nothing. Phone call reminders were preferred to short messaging service.

Conclusions: Woman-delivered HIV self-testing through ANC was acceptable to pregnant women and their male partners. Feedback on additional linkage enablers will be used to alter pre-planned trial arms.

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Effect of availability of HIV self-testing on HIV testing frequency in gay and bisexual men at high risk of infection (FORTH): a waiting-list randomised controlled trial.

Jamil MS, Prestage G, Fairley CK, Grulich AE, Smith KS, Chen M, Holt M, McNulty AM, Bavinton BR, Conway DP, Wand H, Keen P,Bradley J, Kolstee J, Batrouney C, Russell D, Law M, Kaldor JM, Guy RJ. Lancet HIV. 2017 Jun;4(6):e241-e250. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(17)30023-1. Epub 2017 Feb 17.

Background: Frequent testing of individuals at high risk of HIV is central to current prevention strategies. We aimed to determine if HIV self-testing would increase frequency of testing in high-risk gay and bisexual men, with a particular focus on men who delayed testing or had never been tested before.

Methods: In this randomised trial, HIV-negative high-risk gay and bisexual men who reported condomless anal intercourse or more than five male sexual partners in the past 3 months were recruited at three clinical and two community-based sites in Australia. Enrolled participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to the intervention (free HIV self-testing plus facility-based testing) or standard care (facility-based testing only). Participants completed a brief online questionnaire every 3 months, which collected the number of self-tests used and the number and location of facility-based tests, and HIV testing was subsequently sourced from clinical records. The primary outcome of number of HIV tests over 12 months was assessed overall and in two strata: recent (last test ≤2 years ago) and non-recent (>2 years ago or never tested) testers. A statistician who was masked to group allocation analysed the data; analyses included all participants who completed at least one follow-up questionnaire. After the 12 month follow-up, men in the standard care group were offered free self-testing kits for a year. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand clinical trials registry, number actrn12613001236785.

Findings: Between Dec 1, 2013, and Feb 5, 2015, 182 men were randomly assigned to self-testing, and 180 to standard care. The analysis population included 178 (98%) men in the self-testing group (174 person-years) and 165 (92%) in the standard care group (162 person-years). Overall, men in the self-testing group had 701 HIV tests (410 self-tests; mean 4·0 tests per year), and men in the standard care group had 313 HIV tests (mean 1·9 tests per year); rate ratio (rr) 2·08 (95% ci 1·82-2·38; p<0·0001). Among recent testers, men in the self-testing group had 627 tests (356 self-tests; mean 4·2 per year), and men in the standard care group had 297 tests (mean 2·1 per year); rr 1·99 (1·73-2·29; p<0·0001). Among non-recent testers, men in the self-testing group had 74 tests (54 self-tests; mean 2·8 per year), and men in the standard care group had 16 tests (mean 0·7 per year); rr 3·95 (2·30-6·78; p<0·0001). The mean number of facility-based HIV tests per year was similar in the self-testing and standard care groups (mean 1·7 vs 1·9 per year, respectively; rr 0·86, 0·74-1·01; P=0·074). No serious adverse events were reported during follow-up.

Interpretation: HIV self-testing resulted in a two times increase in frequency of testing in gay and bisexual men at high risk of infection, and a nearly four times increase in non-recent testers, compared with standard care, without reducing the frequency of facility-based HIV testing. HIV self-testing should be made more widely available to help increase testing and earlier diagnosis.

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Analysis of false-negative human immunodeficiency virus rapid tests performed on oral fluid in 3 international clinical research studies.

Curlin ME, Gvetadze R, Leelawiwat W, Martin M, Rose C, Niska RW, Segolodi TM, Choopanya K, Tongtoyai J, Holtz TH, Samandari T, McNicholl JM; OraQuick Study Group. Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15;64(12):1663-1669. doi: 10.1093/cid/cix228.

Background: The OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2 Test is a point-of-care test capable of detecting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antibodies in blood and oral fluid. To understand test performance and factors contributing to false-negative results in longitudinal studies, we examined results of participants enrolled in the Botswana TDF/FTC Oral HIV Prophylaxis Trial, the Bangkok Tenofovir Study, and the Bangkok MSM Cohort Study, 3 separate clinical studies of high-risk, HIV-negative persons conducted in Botswana and Thailand.

Methods: In a retrospective observational analysis, we compared oral fluid OraQuick (OFOQ) results among participants becoming HIV infected to results obtained retrospectively using enzyme immunoassay and nucleic acid amplification tests on stored specimens. We categorized negative OFOQ results as true-negative or false-negative relative to nucleic acid amplification test and/or enzyme immunoassay, and determined the delay in OFOQ conversion relative to the estimated time of infection. We used log-binomial regression and generalized estimating equations to examine the association between false-negative results and participant, clinical, and testing-site factors.

Results: Two-hundred thirty-three false-negative OFOQ results occurred in 80 of 287 seroconverting individuals.  Estimated OFOQ conversion delay ranged from 14.5 to 547.5 (median, 98.5) days. Delayed OFOQ conversion was associated with clinical site and test operator (P < .05), preexposure prophylaxis (P = .01), low plasma viral load (P < .02), and time to kit expiration (P < .01). Participant age, sex, and HIV subtype were not associated with false-negative results. Long OFOQ conversion delay time was associated with antiretroviral exposure and low plasma viral load.

Conclusions: Failure of OFOQ to detect HIV-1 infection was frequent and multifactorial in origin. In longitudinal trials, negative oral fluid results should be confirmed via testing of blood samples.

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Multi-country validation of SAMBA - A novel molecular point-of- care test for HIV-1 detection in resource-limited setting.

Ondiek J, Namukaya Z, Mtapuri-Zinyowera S, Balkan S, Elbireer A, Ushiro Lumb I, Kiyaga C, Goel N, Ritchie A, Ncube P, Omuomu K, Ndiege K, Kekitiinwa A,Mangwanya D, Fowler MG, Nadala L, Lee H. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2017 Jun 9. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001476. [Epub ahead of print]

Introduction: Early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and the prompt initiation of antiretroviral therapy are critical to achieving a reduction in the morbidity and mortality of infected infants. The SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test was developed specifically for early infant diagnosis and prevention of mother-to-child transmission programs implemented at the point-of-care in resource-limited settings.

Methods: We have evaluated the performance of this test run on the SAMBA I semi-automated platform with fresh whole blood specimens collected from 202 adults and 745 infants in Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. Results were compared with those obtained with the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HIV-1 assay as performed with fresh whole blood or dried blood spots of the same subjects, and discrepancies were resolved with alternative assays.

Results: The performance of the SAMBA and CAP/CTM assays evaluated at five laboratories in the three countries was similar for both adult and infant samples. The clinical sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the SAMBA test were 100%, 99.2%, 98.7%, and 100%, respectively, with adult samples, and 98.5%, 99.8%, 99.7%, and 98.8%, respectively, with infant samples.

Discussion: Our data suggest that the SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test would be effective for early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants at point-of care settings in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Differentiated human immunodeficiency virus RNA monitoring in resource-limited settings: an economic analysis.

Negoescu DM, Zhang Z, Bucher HC, Bendavid E; Swiss HIV Cohort Study. Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15;64(12):1724-1730. doi: 10.1093/cid/cix177.

Background: Viral load (VL) monitoring for patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended worldwide. However, the costs of frequent monitoring are a barrier to implementation in resource-limited settings. The extent to which personalized monitoring frequencies may be cost-effective is unknown.

Methods: We created a simulation model parameterized using person-level longitudinal data to assess the benefits of flexible monitoring frequencies. Our data-driven model tracked human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals for 10 years following ART initiation. We optimized the interval between viral load tests as a function of patients' age, gender, education, duration since ART initiation, adherence behavior, and the cost-effectiveness threshold. We compared the cost-effectiveness of the personalized monitoring strategies to fixed monitoring intervals every 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months.

Results: Shorter fixed VL monitoring intervals yielded increasing benefits (6.034 to 6.221 discounted quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs] per patient with monitoring every 24 to 1 month over 10 years, respectively, standard error = 0.005 QALY), at increasing average costs: US$3445 (annual monitoring) to US$5393 (monthly monitoring) per patient, respectively (standard error = US$3.7). The adaptive policy optimized for low-income contexts achieved 6.142 average QALYs at a cost of US$3524, similar to the fixed 12-month policy (6.135 QALYs, US$3518). The adaptive policy optimized for middle-income resource settings yields 0.008 fewer QALYs per person, but saves US$204 compared to monitoring every 3 months.

Conclusions: The benefits from implementing adaptive vs fixed VL monitoring policies increase with the availability of resources. In low- and middle-income countries, adaptive policies achieve similar outcomes to simpler, fixed-interval policies.

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Treatment decisions and mortality in HIV-positive presumptive smear-negative TB in the Xpert™ MTB/RIF era: a cohort study.

Hermans SM, Babirye JA, Mbabazi O, Kakooza F, Colebunders R, Castelnuovo B, Sekaggya-Wiltshire C, Parkes-Ratanshi R, Manabe YC. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 16;17(1):433. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2534-2.

Background: The Xpert™ MTB/RIF (XP) has a higher sensitivity than sputum smear microscopy (70% versus 35%) for TB diagnosis and has been endorsed by the WHO for TB high burden countries to increase case finding among HIV co-infected presumptive TB patients. Its impact on the diagnosis of smear-negative TB in a routine care setting is unclear. We determined the change in diagnosis, treatment and mortality of smear-negative presumptive TB with routine use of Xpert MTB/RIF (XP).

Methods: Prospective cohort study of HIV-positive smear-negative presumptive TB patients during a 12-month period after XP implementation in a well-staffed and trained integrated TB/HIV clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Prior to testing clinicians were asked to decide whether they would treat empirically prior to Xpert result; actual treatment was decided upon receipt of the XP result. We compared empirical and XP-informed treatment decisions and all-cause mortality in the first year.

Results: Of 411 smear-negative presumptive TB patients, 175 (43%) received an XP; their baseline characteristics did not differ. XP positivity was similar in patients with a pre-XP empirical diagnosis and those without (9/29 [17%] versus 14/142 [10%], P = 0.23). Despite XP testing high levels of empirical treatment prevailed (18%), although XP results did change who ultimately was treated for TB. When adjusted for CD4 count, empirical treatment was not associated with higher mortality compared to no or microbiologically confirmed treatment.

Conclusions: XP usage was lower than expected. The lower sensitivity of XP in smear-negative HIV-positive patients led experienced clinicians to use XP as a "rule-in" rather than "rule-out" test, with the majority of patients still treated empirically.

Keywords: Empirical treatment; HIV Infections/complications; Molecular diagnostic techniques/methods; Tuberculosis, pulmonary/diagnosis; Tuberculosis, pulmonary/epidemiology

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School and household tuberculosis contact investigations in Swaziland: Active TB case finding in a high HIV/TB burden setting.

Ustero PA, Kay AW, Ngo K, Golin R, Tsabedze B, Mzileni B,Glickman J, Wisile Xaba M, Mavimbela G, Mandalakas AM. PLoS One. 2017 Jun 5;12(6):e0178873. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178873.eCollection 2017.

Background: Investigation of household contacts exposed to infectious tuberculosis (TB) is widely recommended by international guidelines to identify secondary cases of TB and limit spread. There is little data to guide the use of contact investigations outside of the household, despite strong evidence that most TB infections occur outside of the home in TB high burden settings. In older adolescents, the majority of infections are estimated to occur in school. Therefore, as part of a project to increase active case finding in Swaziland, we performed school contact investigations following the identification of a student with infectious TB.

Methods: The Butimba Project identified 7 adolescent TB index cases (age 10-20) with microbiologically confirmed disease attending 6 different schools between June 2014 and March 2015. In addition to household contact investigations, Butimba Project staff worked with the Swaziland School Health Programme (SHP) to perform school contact investigations. At 6 school TB screening events, between May and October 2015, selected students underwent voluntary TB screening and those with positive symptom screens provided sputum for TB testing.

Results: Among 2015 student contacts tested, 177 (9%) screened positive for TB symptoms, 132 (75%) produced a sputum sample, of which zero tested positive for TB. Household contact investigations of the same index cases yielded 40 contacts; 24 (60%) screened positive for symptoms; 19 produced a sputum sample, of which one case was confirmed positive for TB. The odds ratio of developing TB following household vs. school contact exposure was significantly lower (OR 0.0, 95% CI 0.0 to 0.18, P = 0.02) after exposure in school.

Conclusion: School-based contact investigations require further research to establish best practices in TB high burden settings. In this case, a symptom-based screening approach did not identify additional cases of tuberculosis. In comparison, household contact investigations yielded a higher percentage of contacts with positive TB screens and an additional tuberculosis case.

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HPV serostatus pre- and post-vaccination in a randomized phase II preparedness trial among young Western Cape, South African women: the EVRI trial.

Sudenga SL, Torres BN, Botha MH, Zeier M, Abrahamsen ME, Glashoff RH, Engelbrecht S, Schim Van der Loeff MF, Van der Laan LE, Kipping S, Taylor D, Giuliano AR. Papillomavirus Res. 2017 Jun;3:50-56. doi: 10.1016/j.pvr.2017.02.001. Epub 2017 Feb 16.

Background: HPV antibodies are a marker of past exposure to the virus. Our objective was to assess HPV serostatus pre- and post-vaccination among HIV-negative women.

Methods: Women aged 16-24 years old were randomized in a placebo controlled trial utilizing the 4-valent HPV (4vHPV) vaccine (NCT01489527, clinicaltrials.gov). Participants (n=389) received the 4vHPV vaccine or placebo following a three dose schedule. Sera were collected at Day 1 and Month 7 for assessment of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 neutralizing antibody levels using a multiplex competitive Luminex immunoassay (Merck) based on detecting the L1 capsid antigen for each HPV type.

Results: Seroprevalence was 73% for HPV6, 47% for HPV11, 33% for HPV16, and 44% for HPV18. Seroprevalence for any HPV type did not significantly differ by age or lifetime number of partners. The majority of participants (64%) had two or more 4vHPV antibodies present at enrollment and 12% had antibodies to all four. Among women in the vaccine arm, those that were seropositive for HPV16 at enrollment had higher titers at month 7 compared to women that were seronegative for HPV16 at enrollment; this trend holds for the other HPV types as well. Seroconversion among baseline seronegative participants in the placebo group ranged from 5% for HPV16 to 23% for HPV6.

Conclusion: HPV seroprevalence was high in this population, emphasizing the need to vaccinate prior to sexual debut.

Abstract access

 

The performance of human papillomavirus biomarkers in predicting anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in gay and bisexual men.

Jin F, Roberts JM, Grulich AE, Poynten IM, Machalek DA, Cornall A, Phillips S, Ekman D, McDonald RL, Hillman RJ, Templeton DJ, Farnsworth A, Garland SM, Fairley CK, Tabrizi SN; SPANC Research Team. AIDS. 2017 Jun 1;31(9):1303-1311. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001462.

Background: We evaluate the performance of human papillomavirus (HPV) biomarkers in prediction of anal histological high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in gay and bisexual men (GBM) in Sydney, Australia.

Design: Baseline analysis of a 3-year cohort study.

Methods: The study of the prevention of anal cancer is natural history study of anal HPV infection in GBM aged at least 35 years. All participants completed cytological and histological assessments. Stored ThinPrep PreservCyt residua were tested for HPV genotyping (Linear Array and Cobas 4800) and viral load, E6/E7 mRNA expression (NucliSENS easyQ HPV v1) and dual cytology staining of p16/Ki 67 antibodies (CINtecPLUS). Performance of each biomarker was compared with liquid-based anal cytology. The hypothetical referral rates were defined as the proportion of men who had abnormal cytology or tested positive to each of the biomarkers.

Results: The median age of the 617 participants was 49 years (range: 35-79), and 35.7% were HIV-positive. All biomarkers were strongly associated with the grade of HPV-associated anal lesions (P < 0.001 for all). High-risk HPV (HR-HPV) viral load with a 33% cut-off and HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA had similar sensitivity to anal cytology (78.4 and 75.4 vs. 83.2%, respectively), improved specificity (68.0 and 69.4 vs. 52.4%, respectively) and lower referral rates (47.0 and 45.0 vs. 59.2%, respectively). Specificity was significantly higher in the HIV-negative for HR-HPV viral load (72.3 vs. 58.2%, P = 0.005).

Conclusion: HR-HPV viral load and E6/E7 mRNA had similar sensitivity and higher specificity in predicting histological anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion with lower referrals in GBM than anal cytology.

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Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania
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Is a “cure” unrealistic? Long-term remission or maintenance might be the real target for basic scientists

Editor’s notes: News from the Paris IAS conference about the prospects for a cure for HIV was rather sombre this year.  Anthony Fauci, Director of NIAID presented a special session in which he suggested that a true “cure” that could be widely used was likely to prove impossible, and that we should think more in terms of long-term remission in the absence of ART.  He outlined a vision in which the increasing number of broadly neutralizing antibodies and the discovery of more and more potent antibodies might eventually allow for “maintenance treatment” with subcutaneous antibody injections every few months.

Harper’s commentary lays out some of the amazing steps forward over the past decade in understanding how the reservoir of HIV is formed.  We have all heard of CD4 cells, but a much rarer type of lymphocyte, labelled as CD32, seems to be a key target into which HIV integrates.  This allows scientists to develop new ways to measure the reservoir and also to begin to determine which cells are involved in establishing and maintaining the reservoir that makes HIV so hard to cure.

Montserrat et al. also provide a sobering result.  They showed that as expected the size of the HIV reservoir (as measured by the amount of integrated HIV DNA) falls during long term antiretroviral therapy (ART).  When ART is interrupted, HIV begins to replicate and both viral load and the HIV reservoir rebound.  Now they have shown that when ART is restarted after the planned interruption, HIV replication falls promptly, but the HIV reservoir seems to remain high.  This may mean that interruption of ART (including in trials of possible long-term remission) may lead to resetting the clock and losing some of the benefits of the long period of HIV treatment prior to the interruption.

HIV reservoirs in children have been less studied than those in adults.  So the study by Foster et al. is a useful contribution showing that early ART does lead to a smaller reservoir in children too.  This has implications not only for future attempts to “cure” or induce long term remission. It also reduces the pool of variability of the virus in the child, which may make future HIV treatment more straightforward and perhaps reduce the likelihood of developing resistance.  It ties in somewhat with another excitement from Paris, which was the report of a child who after early ART had now been in remission with undetectable viral load for more than a decade without taking further ART.  There was still evidence of viral DNA, so we cannot talk of cure, but understanding how some children (and adults) are able to control HIV replication after treatment provides an important avenue to explore.  Nonetheless, it is crucial to remember that these cases remain very rare, and we should be careful not to encourage false hopes that might lead to people stopping their ART.  This should only be done in the context of a very carefully controlled clinical trial situation where close monitoring is available to restart treatment as soon as the virus rebounds. 

Impact of long-term antiretroviral therapy interruption and resumption on viral reservoir in HIV-1 infected patients.

Montserrat M, Plana M, Guardo AC, Andrés C, Climent N, Gallart T, Leal L,Gatell JM, Sánchez-Palomino S, García F. AIDS. 2017 Aug 24;31(13):1895-1897. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001560. Epub 2017 Jun 5.

We assessed if the increase on viral reservoir after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption (ATI) is reversible upon ART resumption in chronic HIV-1 infected patients. Total HIV-1 DNA increased to pre-ART levels after 48 weeks of ATI to return to pre-ATI levels after 104 weeks of ART resumption. Conversely, integrated HIV-1 DNA remained elevated after ART reinitiation. These data suggest that the increase in reservoir after long-term ART discontinuation might not be reversible at mid-term.

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Early antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV DNA following perinatal HIV infection.

Foster C, Pace M, Kaye S, Hopkins E, Jones M, Robinson N, Fidler S, Frater J; CHERUB Investigators. AIDS. 2017 Aug 24;31(13):1847-1851. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001565. Epub 2017 Jun

The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the size of the HIV reservoir has implications for virological remission in adults, but is not well characterised in perinatally acquired infection (PaHIV). In a prospective observational study of 20 children with PaHIV and sustained viral suppression on ART for >5 years, proviral DNA was significantly higher in deferred (>4 years) versus early (first year of life) ART recipients (p = 0.0062), and correlated with age of initiation (p = 0.13; r = 0.57). No difference was seen in cell-associated viral RNA (p = 0.36). Identifying paediatric populations with smaller reservoirs may inform strategies with potential to induce ART-free remission.

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HIV drug resistance – a manageable risk or the harbinger of a “massive second global wave”?

Editor’s notes: The Paris conference also saw the launch of the WHO report and action plan on HIV drug resistance. Laurie Garret writing in Business Insider invoked drug resistance as one of the elements that could lead to a devastating reversal in progress against HIV. Inevitably with increasing scale up of ART, drug resistance levels will begin to rise.  In the absence of robust laboratory systems to detect virological failure, the risk is that drug resistance will continue to rise and could threaten progress in some countries.  Detection and accurate diagnosis of drug resistance is routine in well-resourced health systems, but still needs to be developed in many of the countries most affected.  While switching to a standard second line regimen provides a public health approach, there will be increasing need for tailored treatment and this requires both strong laboratory systems for sequencing relevant genes, but also good bioinformatic approaches to predict the optimum treatment regimen.

Svard et al. used a split genotyping procedure to explore resistance in people failing HIV treatment in Tanzania.  This term is used to describe a procedure where the nucleic acid amplification, which requires less sophisticated laboratory systems, is performed locally.  The amplified product was then sent to Sweden, where the sequencing and bioinformatics was performed.  Tanzania does not yet have widespread access to viral load testing, so treatment failure is defined using the WHO clinical and immunological criteria.  In this study, it became clear that as many as two thirds of people thought to be failing treatment were probably not failing virologically, and so were at risk of being changed onto second (or third) line treatments unnecessarily.  So the priority should clearly be to establish viral load assays to use to detect treatment failure and to make appropriate switches in treatment.  For the minority where failure was truly associated with a raised viral load, resistance mutations showed that people with failure on first line treatment often had viruses that were also resistant to second generation NNRTIs.  Current standard second line treatment in Tanzania is with a PI based regimen.  Among the first line failure cases, the probability predicted by the bioinformatics for successful second line treatment was around 85% using the medicines registered in Tanzania, which would improve to 95% if all current medicines were available. For people with second-line failure, the corresponding proportions were 79% and 94% respectively. 

Inzaule et al. also reported on drug resistance in East Africa.  They too showed that one in four patients failing second line treatment across Kenya could not be treated effectively with the medicines currently registered in Kenya.

While drug resistance is certainly a threat to the success of ART programmes, it is important to remember that resistance can be minimised by paying close attention to supporting those on treatment to maximize adherence.  Viral load assays need to be cheaper, simpler and more widely available to prevent unnecessary switching.  The results of the recent population-based HIV impact assessments (PHIA) are somewhat reassuring.  In random population-based surveys in Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi, 87%-91% of people taking ART had a suppressed viral load.  And in these three countries, the large majority of people are still taking first line treatment and viral load assays are not routinely available.  “Alert but not alarmed” was the message from the WHO press release accompanying their report. 

Drug resistance testing through remote genotyping and predicted treatment options in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected Tanzanian subjects failing first or second line antiretroviral therapy.

Svärd J, Mugusi S, Mloka D, Neogi U, Meini G, Mugusi F,Incardona F, Zazzi M, Sönnerborg A. PLoS One. 2017 Jun 5;12(6):e0178942. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178942. eCollection 2017.

Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been successfully introduced in low-middle income countries. However an increasing rate of ART failure with resistant virus is reported. We therefore described the pattern of drug resistance mutations at antiretroviral treatment (ART) failure in a real-life Tanzanian setting using the remote genotyping procedure and thereafter predicted future treatment options using rule-based algorithm and the EuResist bioinformatics predictive engine. According to national guidelines, the default first-line regimen is tenofovir + lamivudine + efavirenz, but variations including nevirapine, stavudine or emtricitabine can be considered. If failure on first-line ART occurs, a combination of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and boosted lopinavir or atazanavir is recommended.

Materials and methods: Plasma was obtained from subjects with first (n = 174) or second-line (n = 99) treatment failure, as defined by clinical or immunological criteria, as well as from a control group of ART naïve subjects (n = 17) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Amplification of the pol region was performed locally and the amplified DNA fragment was sent to Sweden for sequencing (split genotyping procedure). The therapeutic options after failure were assessed by the genotypic sensitivity score and the EuResist predictive engine. Viral load was quantified in a subset of subjects with second-line failure (n = 52).

Results: The HIV-1 pol region was successfully amplified from 55/174 (32%) and 28/99 (28%) subjects with first- or second-line failure, respectively, and 14/17 (82%) ART-naïve individuals. HIV-1 pol sequence was obtained in 82 of these 97 cases (84.5%). Undetectable or very low (<2.6 log10 copies/10-3 L) viral load explained 19 out of 25 (76%) amplification failures in subjects at second-line ART failure. At first and second line failure, extensive accumulation of NRTI (88% and 73%, respectively) and NNRTI (93% and 73%, respectively) DRMs but a limited number of PI DRMs (11% at second line failure) was observed. First line failure subjects displayed a high degree of cross-resistance to second-generation NNRTIs etravirine (ETR; 51% intermediate and 9% resistant) and rilpivirine (RPV; 12% intermediate and 58% resistant), and to abacavir (ABC; 49% resistant) which is reserved for second line therapy in Tanzania. The predicted probability of success with the best salvage regimen at second-line failure decreased from 93.9% to 78.7% when restricting access to the NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs currently available in Tanzania compared to when including all approved drugs.

Discussion: The split genotyping procedure is a potential tool to analyse drug resistance in Tanzania but the sensitivity should be evaluated further. The lack of viral load monitoring likely results in a high false positive rate of treatment failures, unnecessary therapy switches and massive accumulation of NRTI and NNRTI mutations. The introduction of regular virological monitoring should be prioritized and integrated with drug resistance studies in resource limited settings.

Abstract Full-text [free] access 

 

Emergence of untreatable, multidrug-resistant HIV-1 in patients failing second-line therapy in Kenya.

Inzaule SC, Hamers RL, Mukui I, Were K, Owiti P, Kwaro D, Rinke de Wit TF, Zeh C. AIDS. 2017 Jun 19;31(10):1495-1498. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001500.

We performed a countrywide assessment of HIV drug resistance among 123 patients with virological failure on second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Kenya. The percentage of patients harbouring intermediate-to-high-level resistance was 27% for lopinavir-ritonavir, 24% for atazanavir-ritonavir and 7% for darunavir-ritonavir, and 25% had complete loss of activity to all available first and second-line drugs. Overall, one in four patients failing second-line ART have completely exhausted available antiretrovirals in Kenya, highlighting the need for increased access to third-line drugs.

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Africa
Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania
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