Articles tagged as "Health systems and services"

Technology for tuberculosis, but why can’t we simply prevent it with proven tools that save lives?

Editor’s notes: Advances in diagnostic test technology have transformed the management of HIV and related infections.  For HIV, we have seen the introduction of self-administered test kits as well as new approaches to HIV viral load testing and nucleic acid based infant diagnosis.  Cryptococcal antigen screening can make prophylaxis and treatment more focused and potentially cost-effective.  For tuberculosis the biggest revolution has been the widespread introduction of the geneXpert® system.  The newest version, the Xpert® Ultra, is more sensitive than the original cartridge and is now being scaled up in countries including South Africa.  Agizew and colleagues conducted a study in Botswana to compare how the Xpert® MTB/RIF cartridge performed when used in centralized or peripheral health facilities.  Encouragingly there were few differences between the two levels, suggesting that the systems can be used close to the point of care.  However, the authors did note a surprisingly high level of unsuccessful tests (15%) both at the central lab and at the peripheral clinic.  Many of these test failures seem to have been because the sample was not processed correctly, and so should be amenable to better training for the health care workers performing the test.  The yield of testing varied greatly between the 13 sites. Between 1% and 23% of samples were positive for tuberculosis, with an average of 14%.  This may be because some sites were receiving specialized referrals.  Of the 447 positive samples, 8% were shown to be rifampicin resistant.  This figure is hard to interpret without more detail of the sample of patients in whom the test was performed.  Resistance is always higher among those who have been treated previously and may be higher in those referred to specialized centres.  Nonetheless, it demonstrates that there are a significant number of people with tuberculosis in Botswana who are very likely to have multi-drug resistant disease and need effective second line treatment.  Technology comes with a price tag.  In this study, the team bought test kits for $18 each, which makes it an expensive choice.  However, if it leads to prompt treatment of multi-drug resistant disease and more accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis, including among those living with HIV, this might still be cost-effective.

A small implementation research study from a single provincial referral centre in Zambia also examined the use and results of geneXpert® screening.  Masenga and colleagues found that 6.6% of 2374 samples tested by geneXpert® over the course of a year were positive for tuberculosis.  An additional 1301 samples were tested by sputum microscopy.  Their results suggest that geneXpert® was used mainly on people who were living with HIV, given that more than 90% of the positive samples came from people living with HIV.  5.9% of the 152 positive samples that were tested in the system were resistant to rifampicin, with no difference by gender.  This study leaves many questions unanswered, such as the sampling strategy, the history of previous treatment and the outcomes of the diagnosis in terms of treatment regimen and success.  However, it shines a light on the ways that new technology is now routine in some settings.  We need more research from diverse settings to paint the full picture of implementation outside traditional research centres.

Zenner and colleagues revisit the question of the risks and benefits of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection.  In a systematic review and network meta-analysis, they demonstrate once more that we have several effective ways to prevent tuberculosis among people living with HIV and that the harms are much smaller than the risks.  The question remains why we have failed so badly to scale up preventive therapy for tuberculosis alongside the success in scale up of antiretrovirals.

 

Peripheral clinic versus centralized laboratory-based XPERT® MTB/RIF performance: experience gained from a pragmatic, stepped-wedge trial in Botswana

Agizew T, Boyd R, Ndwapi N, Auld A, Basotli J, Nyirenda S, Tedla Z, Mathoma A, Mathebula U, Lesedi C, Pals S, Date A, Alexander H, Kuebrich T, Finlay A. PLoS One. 2017 Aug 17;12(8):e0183237. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0183237. eCollection 2017.

Background: In 2011, the Botswana National Tuberculosis Program adopted World Health Organization guidelines and introduced Xpert® MTB/RIF (Xpert®) assay to support intensified case finding among people living with HIV enrolling in care. An evaluation was designed to assess performance under operational conditions to inform the national Xpert® scale-up.

Methods: Xpert® was implemented from August 2012 through November 2014 with 13 GeneXpert® instruments (GeneXpert®) deployed in a phased approach over nine months: nine centralized laboratory and four point-of-care (POC) peripheral clinics. Clinicians and laboratorians were trained on the four-symptom tuberculosis screening algorithm and Xpert® testing. We documented our experience with staff training and GeneXpert® performance. Test results were extracted from GeneXpert® software; unsuccessful tests were analysed in relation to testing sites and trends over time.

Results: During 276 instrument-months of operation a total of 3630 tests were performed, of which 3102 (85%) were successful with interpretable results. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was detected for 447 (14%); of these, 36 (8%) were rifampicin resistant. Of all 3630 Xpert® tests, 528 (15%) were unsuccessful; of these 361 (68%) were classified as "error", 119 (23%) as "invalid" and 48 (9%) as "no result". The total number of recorded error codes was 385 and the most common reasons were related to sample processing (211; 55%) followed by power supply (77; 20%) and cartridge/module related (54; 14%). Cumulative incidence of unsuccessful test was similar between POC (17%, 95% CI: 11-25%) and centralized laboratory-based GeneXpert® instruments (14%, 95% CI: 11-17%; p = 0.140).

Conclusions: Xpert® introduction was successful in the Botswana setting. The incidence of unsuccessful test was similar by GeneXpert® location (POC vs. centralized laboratory). However, unsuccessful test incidence (15%) in our settings was higher than previously reported and was mostly related to improper sample processing. Ensuring adequate training among Xpert® testing staff is essential to minimize errors.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Rifampicin resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis patients using GeneXpert® at Livingstone Central Hospital for the year 2015: a cross sectional explorative study

Masenga SK, Mubila H, Hamooya BM. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Sep 22;17(1):640. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2750-9

Background: Since the recent introduction of GeneXpert® for the detection of Tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance mutations in both primary resistance and acquired resistance in Zambia, little has been documented in literature on the issue of rifampicin resistance especially in the face of a high National TB burden. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of rifampicin resistance in tuberculosis patients at Livingstone Central Hospital for the year 2015.

Methods: This was a cross sectional study conducted at Livingstone Central Hospital where we reviewed 152 records (from January 1, 2015 to 31st December 2015) involving patients who presented with clinically suspected TB or documented TB, whose samples were sent to the laboratory for GeneXpert® Mycobacterium tuberculosis/rifampicin testing. Statistical evaluations used a one-sample test of proportion and Fisher's exact test.

Results: The age of participants ranged from 8 months to 73 years old (median = 34). Of the participants with complete data on gender, 99 (66%) and 52 (34%) were males and females respectively. The TB co-infection with HIV prevalence was 98.3% (p < 0.001). Prevalence of rifampicin resistance was 5.9% and there was no statistical significant difference between being male or female (p = 0.721).

Conclusion: We were able to show from our study, evidence of rifampicin resistance at Livingstone Central Hospital. Hence, there was need for further in-depth research and appropriate interventions (i.e. close follow-up and patient care for drug resistance positive patients).

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection: an updated network meta-analysis

Zenner D, Beer N, Harris RJ, Lipman MC, Stagg HR, van der Werf MJ.  Ann Intern Med. 2017 Aug 15;167(4):248-255. doi: 10.7326/M17-0609. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

Background: Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an important component of tuberculosis (TB) control, and this study updates a previous network meta-analysis of the best LTBI treatment options to inform public health action and programmatic management of LTBI.

Purpose: To evaluate the comparative efficacy and harms of LTBI treatment regimens aimed at preventing active TB among adults and children.

Data sources: PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science from indexing to 8 May 2017; clinical trial registries; and conference abstracts. No language restrictions were applied.

Study selection: Randomized controlled trials that evaluated human LTBI treatments and recorded at least 1 of 2 prespecified end points (hepatotoxicity and prevention of active TB).

Data extraction: 2 investigators independently extracted data from eligible studies and assessed study quality according to a standard protocol.

Data synthesis: The network meta-analysis of 8 new and 53 previously included studies showed that isoniazid regimens of 6 months (odds ratio [OR], 0.65 [95% credible interval {CrI}, 0.50 to 0.83]) or 12 to 72 months (OR, 0.50 [CrI, 0.41 to 0.62]), rifampicin-only regimens (OR, 0.41 [CrI, 0.19 to 0.85]), rifampicin-isoniazid regimens of 3 to 4 months (OR, 0.53 [CrI, 0.36 to 0.78]), rifampicin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide regimens (OR, 0.35 [CrI, 0.19 to 0.61]), and rifampicin-pyrazinamide regimens (OR, 0.53 [CrI, 0.33 to 0.84]) were efficacious compared with placebo. Evidence existed for efficacy of weekly rifapentine-isoniazid regimens compared with no treatment (OR, 0.36 [CrI, 0.18 to 0.73]). No conclusive evidence showed that HIV status altered treatment efficacy.

Limitation: Evidence was sparse for many comparisons and hepatotoxicity outcomes, and risk of bias was high or unknown for many studies.

Conclusion: Evidence exists for the efficacy and safety of 6-month isoniazid monotherapy, rifampicin monotherapy, and combination therapies with 3 to 4 months of isoniazid and rifampicin.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

  • share
0 comments.

Cryptoccal meningitis – the unacceptable consequence of leaving people behind during ART scale up

Editor’s notes: Cryptococcal meningitis is a severe disease that occurs in people with advanced immune suppression.  Its occurrence is an indicator that an HIV treatment programme is not working well, as it is rare in people whose CD4 count is above 100 cells per microlitre.  Rajasingham and colleagues have tried to estimate the current burden of disease.  This is not straightforward, as the number and proportion of people with advanced HIV disease is changing with the increasing scale up of antiretroviral therapy and earlier HIV diagnosis.  Nonetheless, severe immune suppression still occurs in those whose HIV infection remains undiagnosed or is diagnosed too late; among those who are not started on effective ARVs promptly and among those in whom ART fails and who are not managed effectively by the ART treatment programme.  The authors estimate that there could be more than 180 000 deaths from cryptococcal meningitis with the large majority (136 000) in Africa.  This makes Cryptococcus responsible for more than 15% of HIV-related deaths, second only to tuberculosis as a documented cause.  The authors emphasize the need for earlier diagnosis of HIV and better linkage to quality care programmes.  In the meantime, there are also advances in the screening, prophylaxis and treatment of Cryptococcus itself, which require investment in laboratory services and affordable medicines that can save lives until the effects of good ART improves the immune status.

Cassim and colleagues have developed a novel approach to costing different approaches to the roll out of technology for screening for cryptococcal antigen in the blood of people with advanced HIV infection.  Depending on the numbers of samples to be tested in the laboratory, a mix of single use lateral flow assays and automated enzyme immunoassays makes most sense.  The aim is to allow the more cost-effective high-volume sites to subsidize the low volume sites in order to ensure that as many people living with advanced HIV infection as possible can be screened.

Global burden of disease of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: an updated analysis

Rajasingham R, Smith RM, Park BJ, Jarvis JN, Govender NP, Chiller TM, Denning DW, Loyse A, Boulware DR. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 Aug;17(8):873-881. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30243-8. Epub 2017 May 5.

Background: Cryptococcus is the most common cause of meningitis in adults living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Global burden estimates are crucial to guide prevention strategies and to determine treatment needs, and we aimed to provide an updated estimate of global incidence of HIV-associated cryptococcal disease.

Methods: We used 2014 Joint UN Programme on HIV and AIDS estimates of adults (aged >15 years) with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage. Estimates of CD4 less than 100 cells per μL, virological failure incidence, and loss to follow-up were from published multinational cohorts in low-income and middle-income countries. We calculated those at risk for cryptococcal infection, specifically those with CD4 less than 100 cells/μL not on ART, and those with CD4 less than 100 cells per μL on ART but lost to follow-up or with virological failure. Cryptococcal antigenaemia prevalence by country was derived from 46 studies globally. Based on cryptococcal antigenaemia prevalence in each country and region, we estimated the annual numbers of people who are developing and dying from cryptococcal meningitis.

Findings: We estimated an average global cryptococcal antigenaemia prevalence of 6·0% (95% CI 5·8-6·2) among people with a CD4 cell count of less than 100 cells per μL, with 278 000 (95% CI 195 500-340 600) people positive for cryptococcal antigen globally and 223 100 (95% CI 150 600-282 400) incident cases of cryptococcal meningitis globally in 2014. Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 73% of the estimated cryptococcal meningitis cases in 2014 (162 500 cases [95% CI 113 600-193 900]). Annual global deaths from cryptococcal meningitis were estimated at 181 100 (95% CI 119 400-234 300), with 135 900 (75%; [95% CI 93 900-163 900]) deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, cryptococcal meningitis was responsible for 15% of AIDS-related deaths (95% CI 10-19).

Interpretation: Our analysis highlights the substantial ongoing burden of HIV-associated cryptococcal disease, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. Cryptococcal meningitis is a metric of HIV treatment programme failure; timely HIV testing and rapid linkage to care remain an urgent priority.

Abstract access

Estimating the cost-per-result of a national reflexed cryptococcal antigenaemia screening program: Forecasting the impact of potential HIV guideline changes and treatment goals

Cassim N, Coetzee LM, Schnippel K, Glencross DK. PLoS One. 2017 Aug 22;12(8):e0182154. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182154. eCollection 2017.

Introduction: During 2016, the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) introduced laboratory-based reflexed Cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) screening to detect early Cryptococcal disease in immunosuppressed HIV+ patients with a confirmed CD4 count of 100 cells/μl or less.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess cost-per-result of a national screening program across different tiers of laboratory service, with variable daily CrAg test volumes. The impact of potential ART treatment guideline and treatment target changes on CrAg volumes, platform choice and laboratory workflow are considered.

Methods: CD4 data (with counts ≤ 100 cells/μl) from the fiscal year 2015/16 were extracted from the NHLS Corporate Date Warehouse and used to project anticipated daily CrAg testing volumes with appropriately-matched CrAg testing platforms allocated at each of 52 NHLS CD4 laboratories. A cost-per-result was calculated for four scenarios, including the existing service status quo (Scenario-I), and three other settings (as Scenarios II-IV) which were based on information from recent antiretroviral (ART) guidelines, District Health Information System (DHIS) data and UNAIDS 90/90/90 HIV/AIDS treatment targets. Scenario-II forecast CD4 testing offered only to new ART initiates recorded at DHIS. Scenario-III projected all patients notified as HIV+, but not yet on ART (recorded at DHIS) and Scenario-IV forecast CrAg screening in 90% of estimated HIV+ patients across South Africa (also DHIS). Stata was used to assess daily CrAg volumes at the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles across 52 CD4-laboratories. Daily volumes were used to determine technical effort/ operator staff costs (% full time equivalent) and cost-per-result for all scenarios.

Results: Daily volumes ranged between 3 and 64 samples for Scenario-I at the 5th and 95th percentile. Similarly, daily volumes ranges of 1-12, 2-45 and 5-100 CrAg-directed samples were noted for Scenario's II, III and IV respectively. A cut-off of 30 CrAg tests per day defined use of either LFA or EIA platform. LFA cost-per-result ranged from $8.24 to $5.44 and EIA cost-per-result between $5.58 and $4.88 across the range of test volumes. The technical effort across scenarios ranged from 3.2-27.6% depending on test volumes and platform used.

Conclusion: The study reported the impact of programmatic testing requirements on varying CrAg test volumes that subsequently influenced choice of testing platform, laboratory workflow and cost-per-result. A novel percentiles approach is described that enables an overview of the cost-per-result across a national program. This approach facilitates cross-subsidisation of more expensive lower volume sites with cost-efficient, more centralized higher volume laboratories, mitigating against the risk of costing tests at a single site.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

  • share
0 comments.

Understanding different levels and different models of integration

Editor’s notes: Integration between HIV services and programmes and other services and programmes sounds like common sense.  As people with HIV live longer they are more likely to develop other chronic conditions.  Some of these conditions may also be exacerbated by some anti-retroviral medicines, although modern treatment regimens have much less effect on lipid and insulin metabolism.  Low grade chronic inflammation may continue even in people whose HIV is suppressed and people whose CD4 count sunk to a low level before starting seem to be at greater risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease.  Then there are diseases that are more common among people living with HIV, such as tuberculosis and invasive cervical cancer.  And HIV programmes around the world have established some of the best clinical services for chronic care, with regular appointments, decentralized follow-up, algorithmic approaches to clinical changes and so on.  So it seems sensible to look for the synergies and build on them.

However, research on integration makes it clear that there are many different interpretations of what integration should or could mean.  In different epidemiological settings, the priorities will inevitably be very different.  Two useful systematic reviews this month by the same team, review this territory for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and cervical cancer. 

Haldane et al. distinguish between the levels of integration.  Micro level integration involves direct patient care and adjusting diagnosis, treatment and support appropriately.  Meso level integration refers to changes made at the clinic or delivery system level, while macro level integration is about programme management, supply chains and systems organisation.  Despite a large literature (over 7600 papers) on the overlaps between HIV and cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, the authors found only 14 studies that allowed aspects of the integration to be assessed, and only one of these evaluated outcomes.  The others were descriptive studies which highlighted many innovative models, almost all at the meso-level.

Similarly for invasive cervical cancer, which is at least four times as common among women living with HIV as seronegative women, Sigfrid et al. found many papers but only 21 that met their inclusion criteria.  Their models of integration could all be said to be at the meso-level, with one stop shops; co-located services or more complex integrated pathways described.  Again, there were no good evaluations of the outcomes of these systematic changes to the way that services are delivered.  In most countries, all women with cervical cancer should at least be offered an HIV test and appropriate linkage to care expedited for those found to be seropositive.  Women living with HIV need regular screening for early cervical cancer and (as discussed last month) screening for human papillomavirus, the underlying cause of cervical cancer.  However, many ART clinics are now busy and crowded so that even if staff are trained, they do not have time or space or privacy to do cervical examinations.  HPV vaccination campaigns need to be carried out in schools before girls become sexually active.  This could be a good time to engage with sexuality education. However, many campaigns have tended to avoid the challenges of discussing sex with girls who are not yet sexually active, preferring to focus on the vaccine as a cancer prevention tool.  So, the lesson from both these papers is that we need to define more rigorously what we want to achieve with integration and then ensure that we evaluate whether or not our interventions achieve it.

Tuberculosis and HIV have been dancing together since the first descriptions of HIV in the 1980s.  The large majority of tuberculosis patients in many countries are now screened for HIV, with appropriate referral and increasing numbers of people living with HIV are screened regularly for the four classic symptoms of tuberculosis (weight loss, cough, night sweats and fever) and referred onwards for diagnosis.  Yet we still find that collaboration between programmes is not always easy. The number of people living with HIV who are also on tuberculosis treatment reported by the HIV programme may not be the same as the number of people on tuberculosis treatment who are also living with HIV reported by the tuberculosis programme.  Osei et al. report from the Volta Region of Ghana that more than 90% of tuberculosis patients had an HIV test recorded in the tuberculosis register, with an HIV prevalence of 18%.  As has been reported frequently elsewhere, the authors found that HIV was commoner in those with smear negative tuberculosis, and the outcome of treatment was less good.  Their recommendation for strengthening the collaboration between tuberculosis and HIV makes sense, although it has been WHO policy for many years.

The WHO guidance on collaborative TB/HIV activities has always included isoniazid preventive therapy.  However, this remains poorly implemented for reasons that are never very clear.  Despite no good evidence, many tuberculosis programme staff and clinicians worry about the risk of generating isoniazid resistant tuberculosis.  Many HIV programme staff feel that isoniazid remains in the realm of the tuberculosis programme, so that although they are happy to promote cotrimoxazole, they are much slower to prescribe isoniazid.  Many also feel that ART alone should be sufficient to prevent tuberculosis, despite randomized trials in high prevalence settings that demonstrate the additional benefits of isoniazid.  Shayo et al. make a strong economic argument for promoting isoniazid in their study in Tanzania.  They base their model on the rates of tuberculosis and mortality seen during the expansion of pilot programmes for isoniazid in Dar es Salaam.  Both tuberculosis and mortality were significantly lower in the clinics which were part of the pilot programme.  In fact, mortality was approximately tenfold lower, which seems unlikely to be simply due to isoniazid.  Some studies such as TEMPRANO have shown a mortality benefit from isoniazid, while many trials have failed to do so.  Given the non-randomized nature of the comparison, the authors do point out that their conclusions must be tentative.  Nonetheless, it is a convincing demonstration that isoniazid preventive therapy can be incorporated into a busy HIV care clinic and there is abundant evidence that this is the right thing to do.

One more tuberculosis study this month was carried out in Germany.  Karo et al. reviewed the immunology of the 139 people who developed tuberculosis among more than 10 000 people living with HIV in the German ClinSurv cohort.  The authors excluded people who already had tuberculosis at the time that HIV was diagnosed, and found that new diagnoses of tuberculosis were most common in the first couple of years after starting ART.  The authors also show that immune restoration was slower in people who developed tuberculosis.  There was still some deficit up to seven years after ART was started.  Again, their conclusion is that we should be using isoniazid to prevent tuberculosis in people living with HIV, especially people who have spent much of their lives in areas of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa where tuberculosis is much more prevalent than in Europe.  It is often said that Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a very slow growing organism.  We must work harder to ensure that our response to it is not very slow too.  Tuberculosis remains the biggest killer of people with HIV in most of the world, yet for years we have known that a simple, cheap, non-toxic treatment can prevent it. 

 

Integrating cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes with HIV services: a systematic review.

Haldane V, Legido-Quigley H, Chuah FLH, Sigfrid L, Murphy G, Ong SE, Cervero-Liceras F, Watt N, Balabanova D, Hogarth S, Maimaris W, Buse K, McKee M, Piot P, Perel P. AIDS Care. 2017 Jul 5:1-13. doi:10.1080/09540121.2017.1344350. [Epub ahead of print]

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular diseases (CVD), hypertension and diabetes together with HIV infection are among the major public health concerns worldwide. Health services for HIV and NCDs require health systems that provide for people's chronic care needs, which present an opportunity to coordinate efforts and create synergies between programs to benefit people living with HIV and/or AIDS and NCDs. This review included studies that reported service integration for HIV and/or AIDS with coronary heart diseases, chronic CVD, cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), hypertension or diabetes. We searched multiple databases from inception until October 2015. Articles were screened independently by two reviewers and assessed for risk of bias. 11 057 records were identified with 7 616 after duplicate removal. After screening titles and abstracts, 14 papers addressing 17 distinct interventions met the inclusion criteria. We categorized integration models by diseases (HIV with diabetes, HIV with hypertension and diabetes, HIV with CVD and finally HIV with hypertension and CVD and diabetes). Models also looked at integration from micro (patient focused integration) to macro (system level integrations). Most reported integration of hypertension and diabetes with HIV and AIDS services and described multidisciplinary collaboration, shared protocols, and incorporating screening activities into community campaigns. Integration took place exclusively at the meso-level, with no micro- or macro-level integrations described. Most were descriptive studies, with one cohort study reporting evaluative outcomes. Several innovative initiatives were identified and studies showed that CVD and HIV service integration is feasible. Integration should build on existing protocols and use the community as a locus for advocacy and health services, while promoting multidisciplinary teams, including greater involvement of pharmacists. There is a need for robust and well-designed studies at all levels - particularly macro-level studies, research looking at long-term outcomes of integration, and research in a more diverse range of countries.

Abstract access 

 

Integrating cervical cancer with HIV healthcare services: A systematic review.

Sigfrid L, Murphy G, Haldane V, Chuah FLH, Ong SE, Cervero-Liceras F, Watt N, Alvaro A, Otero-Garcia L, Balabanova D, Hogarth S, Maimaris W, Buse K, Mckee M, Piot P, Perel P, Legido-Quigley H. PLoS One. 2017 Jul 21;12(7):e0181156. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0181156. eCollection 2017.

Background: Cervical cancer is a major public health problem. Even though readily preventable, it is the fourth leading cause of death in women globally. Women living with HIV are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer, highlighting the need for access to screening and treatment for this population. Integration of services has been proposed as an effective way of improving access to cervical cancer screening especially in areas of high HIV prevalence as well as lower resourced settings. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of programs integrating cervical cancer and HIV services globally, including feasibility, acceptability, clinical outcomes and facilitators for service delivery.

Methods: This is part of a larger systematic review on integration of services for HIV and non-communicable diseases. To be considered for inclusion studies had to report on programs to integrate cervical cancer and HIV services at the level of service delivery. We searched multiple databases including Global Health, Medline and Embase from inception until December 2015. Articles were screened independently by two reviewers for inclusion and data were extracted and assessed for risk of bias.

Main results: 11 057 records were identified initially. 7616 articles were screened by title and abstract for inclusion. A total of 21 papers reporting interventions integrating cervical cancer care and HIV services met the criteria for inclusion. All but one study described integration of cervical cancer screening services into existing HIV services. Most programs also offered treatment of minor lesions, a 'screen-and-treat' approach, with some also offering treatment of larger lesions within the same visit. Three distinct models of integration were identified. One model described integration within the same clinic through training of existing staff. Another model described integration through co-location of services, with the third model describing programs of integration through complex coordination across the care pathway. The studies suggested that integration of cervical cancer services with HIV services using all models was feasible and acceptable to patients. However, several barriers were reported, including high loss to follow up for further treatment, limited human-resources, and logistical and chain management support. Using visual screening methods can facilitate screening and treatment of minor to larger lesions in a single 'screen-and-treat' visit. Complex integration in a single-visit was shown to reduce loss to follow up. The use of existing health infrastructure and funding together with comprehensive staff training and supervision, community engagement and digital technology were some of the many other facilitators for integration reported across models.

Conclusions: This review shows that integration of cervical cancer screening and treatment with HIV services using different models of service delivery is feasible as well as acceptable to women living with HIV. However, the descriptive nature of most papers and lack of data on the effect on long-term outcomes for HIV or cervical cancer limits the inference on the effectiveness of the integrated programs. There is a need for strengthening of health systems across the care continuum and for high quality studies evaluating the effect of integration on HIV as well as on cervical cancer outcomes.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

 

The burden of HIV on tuberculosis patients in the Volta region of Ghana from 2012 to 2015: implication for tuberculosis control.

Osei E, Der J, Owusu R, Kofie P, Axame WK. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 19;17(1):504. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2598-z.

Background: The impact of HIV on TB, and the implications for TB control, has been acknowledged as a public health challenge. It is imperative therefore to assess the burden of HIV on TB patients as an indicator for monitoring the control efforts of the two diseases in this part of the world. This study aimed at determining the burden of HIV infection in TB patients.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of TB registers in five districts of the Volta Region of Ghana. Prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection was determined. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify the predictors of HIV infection among TB patients and statistical significance was set at p-value <0.05.

Results: Of the 1772 TB patients, 1633 (92.2%) were tested for HIV. The overall prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection was (18.2%; 95% CI: 16.4-20.1). The prevalence was significantly higher among females (24.1%; 95%CI: 20.8-27.7), compared to males (15.1%; 95% CI: 13.1-17.4) (p < 0.001) and among children <15 years of age (27.0%; 95% CI: 18.2-38.1), compared to the elderly ≥70 years (3.5%; 95% CI: 1.6-7.4) (p < 0.001). Treatment success rate was higher among patients with only TB (90%; 95% CI: 88.1-91.5) than among TB/HIV co-infected patients (77.0%; 95% CI: 71.7-81.7) (p < 0.001). Independent predictors of HIV infection were found to be: being female (AOR: 1.79; 95% CI: 1.38-2.13; p < 0.001); smear negative pulmonary TB (AOR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.37-2.47; p < 0.001); and patients registered in Hohoe, Kadjebi, and Kpando districts with adjusted odds ratios of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.13-2.54; p = 0.011), 2.29 (95% CI: 1.46-3.57; p < 0.001), and 2.15 (95% CI: 1.44-3.21; p < 0.001) respectively. Patients ≥70 years of age and those registered in Keta Municipal were less likely to be HIV positive with odds ratios of 0.09 (95% CI: 0.04-0.26; p < 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.38-0.99; p = 0.047) respectively.

Conclusion: TB/HIV co-infection rate in five study districts of the Volta region is quite high, occurs more frequently in female patients than males; among smear negative pulmonary TB patients, and children <15 years of age. Findings also demonstrate that HIV co-infection affects TB treatment outcomes adversely. Strengthening the TB/HIV collaborative efforts is required in order to reduce the burden of co-infection in patients.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access                                                         

 

Cost-effectiveness of isoniazid preventive therapy among HIV-infected patients clinically screened for latent tuberculosis infection in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: a prospective cohort study.

Shayo GA, Chitama D, Moshiro C, Aboud S, Bakari M, Mugusi F. BMC Public Health. 2017 Jul 19;18(1):35. doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4597-9.

Background: One of the reasons why Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for Tuberculosis (TB) is not widely used in low income countries is concerns on cost of excluding active TB. We analyzed the cost-effectiveness of IPT provision in Tanzania having ruled out active TB by a symptom-based screening tool.

Methods: Data on IPT cost-effectiveness was prospectively collected from an observational cohort study of 1283 HIV-infected patients on IPT and 1281 controls; followed up for 24 months. The time horizon for the analysis was 2 years. Number of TB cases prevented and deaths averted were used for effectiveness. A micro costing approach was used from a provider perspective. Cost was estimated on the basis of clinical records, market price or interviews with medical staff. We annualized the cost at a discount of 3%. A univariate sensitivity analysis was done. Results are presented in US$ at an average annual exchange rate for the year 2012 which was Tanzania shillings 1562.4 for 1 US $.

Results: The number of TB cases prevented was 420/100 000 persons receiving IPT. The number of deaths averted was 979/100 000 persons receiving IPT. Incremental cost due to IPT provision was US$ 170 490. The incremental cost-effective ratio was US $ 405.93 per TB case prevented and US $ 174.15 per death averted. These costs were less than 3 times the 768 US $ Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita for Tanzania in the year 2014, making IPT provision after ruling out active TB by the symptom-based screening tool cost-effective. The results were robust to changes in laboratory and radiological tests but not to changes in recurrent, personnel, medication and utility costs.

Conclusion: IPT should be given to HIV-infected patients who screen negative to symptom-based TB screening questionnaire. Its cost-effectiveness supports government policy to integrate IPT to HIV/AIDS care and treatment in the country, given the availability of budget and the capacity of health facilities.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

 

Immunological recovery in tuberculosis/HIV co-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy: implication for tuberculosis preventive therapy.

Karo B, Krause G, Castell S, Kollan C, Hamouda O, Haas W; ClinSurv HIV Study Group. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 25;17(1):517. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2627-y.

Background: Understanding the immune response to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is essential for a clear approach to tuberculosis (TB) preventive therapy. We investigated the immunological recovery in cART-treated HIV-infected patients developing TB compared to those who remained free of TB.

Methods: We extracted data of HIV-infected patients from a multicenter cohort for the HIV clinical surveillance in Germany. No patients included in our study had TB at the beginning of the observation. Using a longitudinal mixed model, we assessed the differences in the mean change of biomarkers (CD4+ cell count, CD8+ cell count, CD4:CD8 ratio and viral load) since cART initiation in patients who remained free of TB vs. those developing TB. To detect the best-fit trajectories of the immunological biomarkers, we applied a multivariable fractional polynomials model.

Results: We analyzed a total of 10 671 HIV-infected patients including 139 patients who developed TB during follow-up. The highest TB incidences were observed during the first two years since cART initiation (0.32 and 0.50 per 100 person-years). In an adjusted multivariable mixed model, we found that the average change in CD4+ cell count recovery was significantly greater by 33 cells/μl in patients who remained free of TB compared with those developing TB. After the initial three months of cART, 65.6% of patients who remaining free of TB achieved CD4+ count of ≥400 cells/μl, while only 11.3% of patients developing TB reached this immunological status after the three months of cART. We found no differences in the average change of CD8+ cell count, CD4:CD8 ratio or viral load between the two-patient groups.

Conclusion: All HIV-infected patients responded to cART. However, patients developing TB showed reduced recovery in CD4+ cell count and this might partly explain the incident TB in HIV-infected patients receiving cART. These findings reinforce the importance of adjunctive TB preventive therapy for patients with reduced recovery in CD4+ cell count.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

  • share
0 comments.

H*V – can we do better for HIV, HBV and HCV if we all work together?

Editor’s notes: The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) signal a major shift in the way that the United Nations and her development partners aim to shape the next decades.  Whereas the Millennium Development Goals reinforced specific programmes for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria, the SDGs call for a more integrated approach to health and well-being and encourage integration and synergy wherever it makes sense.  Hepatitis is one obvious area in which better collaboration and coordination could yield benefits.  Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses are both more common in some of the populations most affected by HIV.  HCV can now be cured with drugs that derive directly from the HIV portfolio, while some ARVs have a direct effect on HBV.

Rwanda is one of the first countries in sub-Saharan Africa to set up a control programme for viral hepatitis, building on the infrastructure established for HIV. Umutesi and colleagues report on results of screening almost 120 000 people living with HIV who entered care for markers of HBV and HCV.  Around 5000 people (4.3%) were identified with a positive Hepatitis B surface antigen and a similar number (4.6%) were found to have antibodies against HCV.  There was marked variation geographically with a range by district from 2%-11% for HBV, higher in more urban areas and in men.  For HCV the range was from 3%-8% and was higher in more rural areas, and also in men.  This study provides a good platform to estimate numbers of people who might need treatment and to plan the next steps in an integrated programme.

People who inject drugs are particularly severely affected by HCV, and so co-infection with both HIV and HCV is common in areas where both viruses circulate.  Some estimates from Ho Chi Minh City in Viet Nam suggest that more than 40% of people who inject drugs are living with HIV and that essentially all of these people are also co-infected with HCV.  Birger R and colleagues developed a mathematical model to explore the likely impact of interventions aimed at HIV, HCV or broad harm reduction [with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT)] on future mortality and incidence of both infections.  While ART scale up reduces HIV incidence and mortality, it has no effect on HCV.  MMT is effective at reducing incidence of both HIV and HCV (and has morbidity and mortality benefits beyond these viruses).  However, MMT does not help the many people already living with HCV and so has little effect on HCV related mortality. So the model is clear that treatment for HCV needs to be an important part of a combined programme and that we urgently need to find ways to reduce the price of directly acting antivirals if we are to save more Vietnamese lives.

Haldane and colleagues have also focused on this intersection between HIV and substance use services.  They carried out a systematic review to understand the models and implications of integration of service delivery.  The authors expand their typology of integration models considering the point of entry of the client, and the degree to which services are co-located and delivered.  Integration can be considered as “clinical”, “service” or “systems”.  The first two can operate at the micro or meso level meaning that individual staff can deal with both situations, or that staff are trained to provide appropriate referrals.  Systems level integration operates at a macro level and implies that programmes for each service make collaborations and coordinate in ways that may affect staffing, funding and fragmentation of services. Although there are theoretical advantages to coordination and integration (as shown by the mathematical model above), there are few good empirical studies of integrated service delivery reported outside the USA.  The authors considered that most of the intervention studies had a risk of bias in the interpretation of their impact, although all demonstrated positive changes in outcomes.  Furthermore, almost all the studies focussed on integration at the clinic or individual provider level (meso or micro) rather than addressing the larger systemic challenges that we need to consider.  If we are to achieve the ideals laid out in the Sustainable Development Goals, we will need to overcome some of these systemic challenges, particularly for populations that are criminalized and marginalized by many of the public services.

Prevalence of hepatitis B and C infection in persons living with HIV enrolled in care in Rwanda.

Umutesi J, Simmons B, Makuza JD, Dushimiyimana D, Mbituyumuremyi A, Uwimana JM, Ford N, Mills EJ, Nsanzimana S. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 May 2;17(1):315. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2422-9.

Background: Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The burden of these co-infections in sub-Saharan Africa is still unclear. We estimated the prevalence of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis C antibody (HCVAb) among HIV-infected individuals in Rwanda and identified factors associated with infection.

Methods: Between January 2016 and June 2016, we performed systematic screening for HBsAg and HCVAb among HIV-positive individuals enrolled at public and private HIV facilities across Rwanda. Results were analyzed to determine marker prevalence and variability by demographic factors.

Results: Overall, among 117 258 individuals tested, the prevalence of HBsAg and HCVAb was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] (4.2-4.4) and 4.6% (95% CI 4.5-4.7) respectively; 182 (0.2%) HIV+ individuals were co-infected with HBsAg and HCVAb. Prevalence was higher in males (HBsAg, 5.4% [5.1-5.6] vs. 3.7% [3.5-3.8]; HCVAb, 5.0% [4.8-5.2] vs. 4.4% [4.3-4.6]) and increased with age; HCVAb prevalence was significantly higher in people aged ≥65 years (17.8% [16.4-19.2]). Prevalence varied geographically.

Conclusion: HBV and HCV co-infections are common among HIV-infected individuals in Rwanda. It is important that viral hepatitis prevention and treatment activities are scaled-up to control further transmission and reduce the burden in this population. Particular efforts should be made to conduct targeted screening of males and the older population. Further assessment is required to determine rates of HBV and HCV chronicity among HIV-infected individuals and identify effective strategies to link individuals to care and treatment.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

The impact of HCV therapy in a high HIV-HCV prevalence population: A modeling study on people who inject drugs in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Birger RB, Le T, Kouyos RD, Grenfell BT, Hallett TB. PLoS One. 2017 May 11;12(5):e0177195. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0177195. eCollection 2017.

Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) coinfection is a major global health problem especially among people who inject drugs (PWID), with significant clinical implications. Mathematical models have been used to great effect to shape HIV care, but few have been proposed for HIV/HCV.

Methods: We constructed a deterministic compartmental ODE model that incorporated layers for HIV disease progression, HCV disease progression and PWID demography. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) and Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) scale-ups were modeled as from 2016 and projected forward 10 years. HCV treatment roll-out was modeled beginning in 2026, after a variety of MMT scale-up scenarios, and projected forward 10 years.

Results: Our results indicate that scale-up of ART has a major impact on HIV though not on HCV burden. MMT scale-up has an impact on incidence of both infections. HCV treatment roll-out has a measurable impact on reductions of deaths, increasing multifold the mortality reductions afforded by just ART/MMT scale-ups.

Conclusion: HCV treatment roll-out can have major and long-lasting effects on averting PWID deaths on top of those averted by ART/MMT scale-up. Efficient intervention scale-up of HCV alongside HIV interventions is critical in Vietnam.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Integrating HIV and substance use services: a systematic review

Haldane V, Cervero-Liceras F, Chuah FL, Ong SE, Murphy G, Sigfrid L, Watt N, Balabanova D, Hogarth S, Maimaris W, Buse K, Piot P, McKee M, Perel P, Legido-Quigley H. Journal of the International AIDS Society. 2017 May 30;20(1).http://dx.doi.org/10.7448/IAS.20.1.21585.

Introduction: Substance use is an important risk factor for HIV, with both concentrated in certain vulnerable and marginalized populations. Although their management differs, there may be opportunities to integrate services for substance use and HIV. In this paper we systematically review evidence from studies that sought to integrate care for people living with HIV and substance use problems.

Methods: Studies were included if they evaluated service integration for substance use and HIV. We searched multiple databases from inception until October 2015. Articles were screened independently by two reviewers and assessed for risk of bias.

Results and discussion: 11 057 records were identified, with 7616 after removal of duplicates. After screening titles and abstracts, 51 met the inclusion criteria. Integration models were categorized by location (HIV, substance use and other facilities), level of integration from micro (integrated care delivered to individuals) to macro (system level integrations) and degree of integration from least (screening and counselling only) to most (care for HIV, substance use and/or other illnesses at the same facility). Most reported descriptive or cohort studies; in four randomized control trials integrated activities improved patient outcomes. There is potential for integrating services at all facility types, including mobile health services. While services offering screening only can achieve synergies, there are benefits from delivering integrated treatment for HIV and substance use, including ease of referral to other mental health and social services.

Conclusions: Our review used a wide range of databases and conference archives to increase representation of papers from low- and middle-income countries. Limitations include the overrepresentation of studies from the United States, and the descriptive nature of the majority of papers. The evidence reviewed shows that greater integration offers important benefits in both patient and service outcomes but further research and outcome reporting is needed to better understand innovative and holistic care models at the complex intersection of substance use and HIV services.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America
  • share
0 comments.

Where are we heading with the horrible interaction between human papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV?

Editor’s notes: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world.  There are over 200 different strains of HPV, distinguished by genetic typing.  The strains are classified into high-risk and low-risk based on their associations with the development of cervical cancer, but also genital warts and anal cancer.  HPV16 is the most common high-risk strain and is found in about half of cervical cancers and 70% of anal cancers.  Although anal cancer is much less common than cervical cancer among women, there is clear evidence that women living with HIV are at greater risk not only of cervical cancer but also of anal cancer.

In a study in Vitoria, Brazil, Volpini and colleagues collected cervical and anal samples from 126 women living with HIV who had recently had a normal Pap smear, and so did not already have pre-cancerous lesions in the cervix.  They found DNA from HPV in 71% of the women. 39% of women had HPV in cervical samples, while 60% had HPV in anal samples.

HPV16 was the most prevalent type at the cervical and anal sites (9% and 18%, respectively).  Other high risk strains were found in the cervical samples from more than 30% of women and in the anal samples of another 12% of women (some women had multiple strains). All currently available vaccines protect against HPV16 and one also protects against HPV45 and 31 (which accounted for almost half of the remaining high risk strains from the cervical samples).  The vaccine works best when given before any HPV infection, and is therefore recommended for girls before they become sexually active.  However, persistence and clearance of HPV is a dynamic process and the possible benefits of vaccination in those already infected are not yet clear.

Testing for HPV is becoming increasingly sophisticated, with molecular technology becoming available that allows detection of DNA and strain typing.  It seems very probable that women living with HIV with high-risk strains in either cervical or anal samples are at greater risk of developing cancer and therefore need additional more intense screening to detect and treat any pre-cancerous abnormalities in their epithelium prior to the development of invasive cancers.  Current guidelines already recommend that women living with HIV are offered Pap smears more regularly than their HIV-negative peers.  DNA based technology may make it possible to offer a more targeted approach to women at the most risk.

In the meantime, encouraging HPV vaccination among schoolgirls (and eventually boys too) is a long term prevention measure.  Ensuring that HPV screening services and HIV prevention and care services are well co-ordinated or even integrated is something that will have an immediate impact on preventing deaths from cervical cancer.  Incorporating molecular testing might help us to reduce the incidence of anal cancer too.

The high prevalence of HPV and HPV16 European variants in cervical and anal samples of HIV-seropositive women with normal Pap test results.

Volpini LPB, Boldrini NAT, de Freitas LB, Miranda AE, Spano LC. PLoS One. 2017 Apr 20;12(4):e0176422. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176422. eCollection 2017.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive women are more likely to have anogenital cancer, and high risk-HPV (HR-HPV) infection is the main associated factor. Between August 2013 and December 2015, we conducted a descriptive study to determine the HPV genotypes and HPV16 variants in cervical and anal samples of HIV-seropositive women with a normal Pap test. The viral DNA was amplified by PCR using the PGMY09/11 set of primers. Reverse line blot (RLB), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing assays were used to determine the HPV genotypes. HPV16 variants were identified by gene sequencing. We found a high frequency of HR-HPV (60.3%; 76/126) at the anogenital site among HIV-seropositive women and without association with anal intercourse. HPV16 and European variant predominated among the HR-HPV. Mixed infections with at least three different HPV types were common, particularly at the anal site. CD4+ T-cell counts below 500 cells/mm3, a HIV viral load above 50 copies/mL and an age of 18 to 35 years old were all related to HPV anal infection. Our study showed a high frequency of HR-HPV in both cervical and anal sites of women with negative cytology belonging to a risk group for the development of anogenital cancer.

Abstract Full-text [free] access 

Cancers, Comorbidity
Europe
Brazil
  • share
0 comments.

Integration of reproductive health and rights

Editor’s notes: Integration of reproductive health services and rights needs to be well coordinated with HIV services, so a randomized trial of integration of family planning services into HIV care clinics in Kenya by Cohen CR and colleagues is encouraging.  In their initial randomized trial, 12 clinics were randomly selected for early integration using resources from the study team, while six were delayed.  Subsequently the Ministry of Health took over the integration and provision of “one stop shop” services at all 18 clinics.  The improvements in contraceptive uptake and decreased pregnancy rates that had been observed in the first phase were maintained during the second phase giving more confidence that it was truly the integrated nature of the services rather than the presence of special study team that had led to the difference.

Another major push for integration or coordination between HIV and sexual and reproductive health and rights services is around the prevention of cervical cancer.  Cervical cancer is caused by long-term infection with specific types of human papilloma virus.  Women living with HIV are at considerably increased risk of cervical cancer compared to their HIV-negative peers.  A large cohort study by Kelly HA et al. in Burkina Faso and South Africa has shown that women living with HIV, attending clinical care services have a high prevalence (59-79% at baseline), incidence (48%) and persistence (up to 70% for some types) of HR-HPV and correspondingly a high prevalence and incidence of cervical neoplasia. There are two HPV vaccines currently available, the first prevents HPV types 16 and 18 (the causes of around 70% of cervical cancer) while the newer (and currently more expensive) vaccine prevents nine types (that cause at least 90% of cervical cancer).  HPV vaccination is recommended to be given before sexual debut, as it gives high protection against the specific types of HPV prior to acquisition.  The dynamics of the many different types of HPV after acquisition is less clear.  The virus is often acquired and they may be cleared or may persist.  So this study provides important background data for understanding the possible role of vaccination and also which types are most associated with pre-cancers (cervical Intra-epithelial neoplasia [CIN]) that can be treated and cured relatively easily.  In particular, in this study, HPV58, which is in the same (alpha-9) family as HPV16 showed the greatest association with CIN2+.  HPV58 is included in the newer nonavalent vaccine, but not the current bi- or quadrivalent vaccine.  Overall this is an area where we need more research on the impact of vaccination and screening programmes for women living with HIV, but in the meantime, HPV vaccination for school girls (and boys) is an investment in the future, since these vaccines are effective ways to stop people dying of cervical (and other HPV-related) cancers.

One of the challenges for integrated reproductive services is to continue to emphasize the importance of condoms for protection against HIV and sexually transmitted infections even if other methods are being used for contraception.  Such “dual protection” is particularly hard to achieve in married or cohabiting couples despite evidence of ongoing risk of HIV infection.  A study in 2388 urban 18-24 year old individuals in Zambia (69% female; 35% married) shows that condom use is still much too low with only 45% reporting that they had used a condom in the last 12 months. As might be anticipated, the study found that the poorest and people who were married were least likely to use condoms while people who discussed contraception and agreed to use condoms were more likely to do so [Pinchoff J et al.] The importance of dual protection, and of promoting broader HIV prevention messages to women through integrated (or at least coordinated) reproductive health and rights services is made even more important given the possibility that depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) as a long acting reversible contraceptive may increase the risk of HIV acquisition.  WHO has recently changed their guidance to make such contraceptives grade 2 in the Medical Eligibility for Contraceptives (MEC) guidelines.

Integration of family planning services into HIV care clinics: Results one year after a cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya.

Cohen CR, Grossman D, Onono M, Blat C, Newmann SJ, Burger RL, Shade SB, Bett N, Bukusi EA. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 22;12(3):e0172992. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172992.eCollection 2017.

Objectives: To determine if integration of family planning (FP) and HIV services led to increased use of more effective contraception (i.e. hormonal and permanent methods, and intrauterine devices) and decreased pregnancy rates.

Design: Cohort analysis following cluster randomized trial, when the Kenya Ministry of Health led integration of the remaining control (delayed integration) sites and oversaw integrated services at the original intervention (early integration) sites.

Setting: Eighteen health facilities in Kenya.

Subjects: Women aged 18-45 receiving care: 5682 encounters at baseline, and 11 628 encounters during the fourth quarter of year 2.

Intervention: "One-stop shop" approach to integrating FP and HIV services.

Main outcome measures: Use of more effective contraceptive methods and incident pregnancy across two years of follow-up.

Results: Following integration of FP and HIV services at the six delayed integration clinics, use of more effective contraception increased from 31.7% to 44.2% of encounters (+12.5%; Prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.39 (1.19-1.63). Among the twelve early integration sites, the proportion of encounters at which women used more effective contraceptive methods was sustained from the end of the first to the second year of follow-up (37.5% vs. 37.0%). Pregnancy incidence including all 18 integrated sites in year two declined in comparison to the control arm in year one (rate ratio: 0.72; 95% CI 0.60-0.87).

Conclusions: Integration of FP services into HIV clinics led to a sustained increase in the use of more effective contraceptives and decrease in pregnancy incidence 24 months following implementation of the integrated service model.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01001507.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Associations of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes with high-grade cervical neoplasia (CIN2+) in a cohort of women living with HIV in Burkina Faso and South Africa.

Kelly HA, Ngou J, Chikandiwa A, Sawadogo B, Gilham C, Omar T, Lompo O, Doutre S), Meda N, Weiss HA, Delany-Moretlwe S, Segondy M, Mayaud P; HARP Study Group. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 23;12(3):e0174117. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174117.eCollection 2017.

Objective: To describe associations of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in women living with HIV (WLHIV) in Burkina Faso (BF) and South Africa (SA).

Methods: Prospective cohort of WLHIV attending HIV outpatient clinics and treatment centres. Recruitment was stratified by ART status. Cervical HPV genotyping using INNO-LiPA and histological assessment of 4-quadrant cervical biopsies at enrolment and 16 months later.

Results: Among women with CIN2+ at baseline, the prevalence of any HR-HPV genotypes included in the bi/quadrivalent (HPV16/18) or nonavalent (HPV16/18/31/35/45/52/58) HPV vaccines ranged from 37% to 90%. HPV58 was most strongly associated with CIN2+ (aOR = 5.40, 95%CI: 2.77-10.53). At 16-months follow-up, persistence of any HR-HPV was strongly associated with incident CIN2+ (aOR = 7.90, 95%CI: 3.11-20.07), as was persistence of HPV16/18 (aOR = 5.25,95%CI: 2.14-12.91) and the additional HR types in the nonavalent vaccine (aOR =3.23, 95%CI: 1.23-8.54).

Conclusion: HR-HPV persistence is very common among African WLHIV and is linked to incident CIN2+. HPV vaccines could prevent between 37-90% of CIN2+ among African WLHIV.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Why don't urban youth in Zambia use condoms? The influence of gender and marriage on non-use of male condoms among young adults.

Pinchoff J, Boyer CB, Mutombo N, Chowdhuri RN, Ngo TD. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 23;12(3):e0172062. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172062.eCollection 2017.

Background: Zambia experiences high unmet need for family planning and high rates of HIV, particularly among youth. While male condoms are widely available and 95%of adults have heard of them, self-reported use in the past 12 months is low among young adults (45%). This study describes factors associated with non-use of male condoms among urban young adults in Zambia.

Methods: A household cross-sectional survey in four urban districts was conducted from November 2015 to January 2016 among sexually active young adults ages 18-24 years. A random walk strategy was implemented in urban areas; eligible, enrolled participants were administered a survey on household characteristics, health access, and knowledge, attitudes and practices related to contraception. Relative risk regression models were built to determine factors associated with the decision to not use a male condom (non-use) at most recent sexual intercourse.

Results: A total of 2388 individuals were interviewed; 69% were female, 35% were married, and average lifetime sex partners was 3.45 (SD±6.15). Non-use of male condoms was 59% at most recent sexual intercourse. In a multivariate model, women were more likely to report non-use of a male condom compared with men (aRR = 1.24[95% CI: 1.11, 1.38]), married individuals were more likely to report non-use compared with unmarried individuals (aRR = 1.59 [1.46, 1.73]), and those residing in the highest poverty wards were more likely to report non-use compared with those in the lowest poverty wards (aRR = 1.31 [1.16, 1.48]). Those with more negative perceptions of male condom use were 6% more likely to report non-use (aRR = 1.06 [1.03, 1.09]). Discussion regarding contraception with a partner decreased non-use 13% (aRR = 0.87 [0.80, 0.95]) and agreement regarding male condom use with a partner decreased non-use 16% (aRR = 0.84 [0.77, 0.91)]).

Discussion: Non-use of male condoms is high among young, married adults, particularly women, who may be interested in contraception for family planning but remain at risk of STI infection. Effective marketing strategy of dual protection methods to this population is critical.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Africa
Burkina Faso, Kenya, South Africa, Zambia
  • share
0 comments.

Infectious co-morbidities – why are people still dying of advanced HIV infections?

Editor’s notes: Tuberculosis remains the biggest reported killer of people living with HIV.  Studies from Guangxi, China and Nigeria examine risk factors for tuberculosis.  In the Chinese study, Cui Z and colleagues found almost one in six of 1019 people receiving care for HIV had active tuberculosis.  The risk factors that they found when comparing these 160 people with tuberculosis to matched controls living with HIV but without tuberculosis were well-known (low CD4 cell count, smoking and non-use of ART).  Long duration of HIV infection was also independently associated with developing tuberculosis, emphasising the need for tuberculosis specific measures in addition to ART.  The authors recommend standard approaches that need to be strengthened (active screening and case-finding with early initiation of ART; isoniazid preventive therapy and better infection control).  The most extraordinary statistic is how much higher the rate of tuberculosis is among this group of people receiving HIV care than it is among the general population of Guangxi.  173 times higher is pretty impressive!

The Pathmanathan I et al. study in Nigeria, carried out as part of a broader analysis of the outcomes of a nationally representative sample of people taking ART, is more optimistic.  The incidence rate for tuberculosis once people started on ART was 0.57 per 100 person years, which compares quite favourably with the estimated incidence for Nigeria from the WHO Global Tuberculosis 2016 report [link] of 0.32 per 100 person years.  Furthermore, most of the incident tuberculosis occurred soon after starting ART and (as might be expected) was most common in people with low CD4 count; previous tuberculosis or suspected but not diagnosed tuberculosis on starting ART.  Once people’s CD4 count was above 200 cells per ml, the incidence rate was 0.29 per 100 person-years.  This is encouraging, as it suggests that a good ART programme could have a significant impact on the overall risk of tuberculosis.  The aim of collaborative tuberculosis and HIV programme efforts must be to find people living with HIV before they are so immunocompromised.  In this study, the average CD4 count at enrolment was less than 200 cells per ml and around 5% of people already had tuberculosis at that time.

Late HIV diagnosis was also the subject of a study from Jiangsu province in China.  Hu H and colleagues looked at the trends in HIV testing and presentation to care before the CD4 count fell below 350 cells per ml.  From 2011-2014 in cross-sectional annual community based surveys among around 2500 men who have sex with men (MSM), there was a modest decline in the proportion who had had an HIV test within the last 12 months from 60% to 53%, and late presentation remained stable around 40%.  We have to shift from this plateau and the authors point out that HIV self-tests seem highly acceptable to MSM in China and that social media and internet based advocacy might also help.

There is increasing interest in co-infections with hepatitis B and C viruses in people living with HIV.  Hepatitis B is widespread in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa with “horizontal” transmission occurring in childhood.  Vaccination is now included as part of some countries programmes on expanded immunisation.  Co-infection with HIV and Hepatitis B leads to more rapid progression of liver damage and to liver cancer. Seremba E and colleagues tested stored sera from people living with HIV in the Rakai community and found that around half had already been infected with hepatitis B (in line with the high prevalence of infection in children).  During the follow up samples from people who were hepatitis B negative, new infections with hepatitis B occurred in 39 individuals, giving an incidence rate of 1.2 per 100 person years.  While hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for people living with HIV who are not infected, this study shows that ART is also protective, particularly if it contains lamivudine or tenofovir.  So this may be an added benefit of the wider scale-up of ART.

Despite advance in ART, too many people still die with HIV-associated infections that are only seen at low CD4 cell counts.  An important example is cryptococcal meningitis, which causes an insidious onset of symptoms. By the time patients are seen at the hospital with severe headache and signs of raised intracranial pressure it is often too late to prevent them from dying. This is because the best medicines (liposomal amphotericin and flucytosine) are expensive and often not available.  So WHO recommends pre-emptive treatment for people who are first seen at the health service with CD4 counts less than 100 cells per ml and with cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) detectable in the blood.  A modelling study by Ramachandran A et al. from Uganda and the US considered the likely costs and benefits of using a new lateral flow assay for CRAG for people living with HIV with a low CD4 count, with pre-emptive treatment with fluconazole for people found to be CRAG-positive. The results, including various sensitivity tests, are strongly in favour of widespread implementation of this strategy. The authors calculate that it would cost Uganda around US$650 000 per year and would avert more than a thousand deaths.  Like the tuberculosis discussions above, the real aim is to prevent people living with HIV reaching the stage where “old-fashioned” opportunistic infections can cause such misery.  However in the medium term, we are likely to continue to see many people presenting late in the course of their infections, and CRAG (and tuberculosis) screening and management are key ways to prevent mortality.

Risk factors associated with Tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV/AIDS: A pair-matched case-control study in Guangxi, China.

Cui Z, Lin M, Nie S, Lan R. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 30;12(3):e0173976. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0173976.eCollection 2017.

Background: As one of the poorest provinces in China, Guangxi has a high HIV and TB prevalence, with the annual number of TB/HIV cases reported by health department among the highest in the country. However, studies on the burden of TB-HIV co-infection and risk factors for active TB among HIV-infected persons in Guangxi have rarely been reported.

Objective: To investigate the risk factors for active TB among people living with HIV/AIDS in Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, China.

Methods: A surveillance survey was conducted of 1019 HIV-infected patients receiving care at three AIDS prevention and control departments between 2013 and 2015. We investigated the cumulative prevalence of TB during 2 years. To analyze risk factors associated with active TB, we conducted a 1:1 pair-matched case-control study of newly reported active TB/HIV co-infected patients. Controls were patients with HIV without active TB, latent TB infection or other lung disease, who were matched with the case group based on sex and age (± 3 years).

Results: A total of 1019 subjects were evaluated. 160 subjects (15.70%) were diagnosed with active TB, including 85 clinically diagnosed cases and 75 confirmed cases. We performed a 1:1 matched case-control study, with 82 TB/HIV patients and 82 people living with HIV/AIDS based on surveillance site, sex and age (±3) years. According to multivariate analysis, smoking (OR = 2.996, 0.992-9.053), lower CD4+ T-cell count (OR = 3.288, 1.161-9.311), long duration of HIV-infection (OR = 5.946, 2.221-15.915) and non-use of ART (OR = 7.775, 2.618-23.094) were independent risk factors for TB in people living with HIV/AIDS.

Conclusion: The prevalence of active TB among people living with HIV/AIDS in Guangxi was 173 times higher than general population in Guangxi. It is necessary for government to integrate control planning and resources for the two diseases. Medical and public health workers should strengthen health education for TB/HIV prevention and treatment and promote smoking cessation. Active TB case finding and early initiation of ART is necessary to minimize the burden of disease among patients with HIV, as is IPT and infection control in healthcare facilities.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria, 2004-2012.

Pathmanathan I, Dokubo EK, Shiraishi RW, Agolory SG, Auld AF, Onotu D, Odafe S, Dalhatu I, Abiri O, Debem HC, Bashorun A, Ellerbrock T. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 10;12(3):e0173309. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173309.eCollection 2017.

Background: Nigeria had the most AIDS-related deaths worldwide in 2014 (170 000), and 46% were associated with tuberculosis (TB). Although treatment of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces TB-associated morbidity and mortality, incident TB can occur while on ART. We estimated incidence and characterized factors associated with TB after ART initiation in Nigeria.

Methods: We analyzed retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adult patients on ART. Data were abstracted from 3496 patient records, and analyses were weighted and controlled for a complex survey design. We performed domain analyses on patients without documented TB disease and used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess factors associated with TB incidence after ART.

Results: At ART initiation, 3350 patients (95.8%) were not receiving TB treatment. TB incidence after ART initiation was 0.57 per 100 person-years, and significantly higher for patients with CD4<50/μL (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]:4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-12.7) compared with CD4≥200/μL. Patients with suspected but untreated TB at ART initiation and those with a history of prior TB were more likely to develop incident TB (AHR: 12.2, 95% CI: 4.5-33.5 and AHR: 17.6, 95% CI: 3.5-87.9, respectively).

Conclusion: Incidence of TB among PLHIV after ART initiation was low, and predicted by advanced HIV, prior TB, and suspected but untreated TB. Study results suggest a need for improved TB screening and diagnosis, particularly among high-risk PLHIV initiating ART, and reinforce the benefit of early ART and other TB prevention efforts.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Trends in late HIV diagnosis among men who have sex with men in Jiangsu province, China: Results from four consecutive community-based surveys, 2011-2014.

Hu H, Yan H, Liu X, Xu X, Xu J, Qiu T, Shi LE, Fu G, HuanX, McFarland W, Wei C). PLoS One. 2017 Mar 9;12(3):e0172664. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0172664.eCollection 2017.

Objectives: To examine trends in HIV testing, late HIV diagnosis and associated factors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jiangsu province, China.

Methods: Four consecutive community-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted among MSM from 2011 to 2014 in eight cities in the province. Participants were recruited from MSM venues and via the internet. HIV bio-behavioral surveys were conducted to collect demographic and behavioral data and measure HIV infection. HIV-infected participants with CD4 counts less than 350 cells/µL were defined as having a late HIV diagnosis. Chi-square trend tests were used to compare temporal changes over the years and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with late diagnosis.

Results: A total of 2441, 2677, 2591 and 2610 participants were enrolled in 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively. Testing for HIV in the last 12 months decreased over the time period, from 59.9% to 52.5% (p<0.001). Late HIV diagnosis remained high and steady, ranging from 33.3% to 44.2% over the years with no significant change over time (p = 0.418). MSM who were older than 24 years (aOR =1.748, p = 0.020 for 25-39 years old; aOR = 3.148, p<0.001 for 40 years old or older), were recruited via internet (aOR = 1.596, p = 0.024), and did not have an HIV test in the past 12 months (aOR = 3.385, p<0.001) were more likely to be late diagnosed.

Conclusions: Our study showed a plateau in HIV testing among MSM in China, in parallel to high levels of late diagnosis. Emerging and innovative strategies such as HIV self-testing and reaching more MSM by internet, both highly acceptable to MSM in China, may reduce late diagnosis.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Hepatitis B incidence and prevention with antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive individuals in Uganda.

Seremba E, Ssempijja V, Kalibbala S, Gray RH, Wawer MJ, Nalugoda F, Casper C, Phipps W, Ocama P, Serwadda D, Thomas DL, Reynolds SJ. 123. AIDS. 2017 Mar 27;31(6):781-786. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001399.

Objective: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) may interfere with replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV), raising the hypothesis that HBV infection might be prevented by ART. We investigated the incidence and risk factors associated with HBV among HIV-infected adults in Rakai, Uganda.

Methods: We screened stored sera from 944 HIV-infected adults enrolled in the Rakai Community Cohort Study between September 2003 and March 2015 for evidence of HBV exposure. Serum from participants who tested anti-hepatitis B core-negative (497) at baseline were tested over 3-7 consecutive survey rounds for incident HBV. Poisson incidence methods were used to estimate incidence of HBV with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), whereas Cox proportional regression methods were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs).

Results: Thirty-nine HBV infections occurred over 3342 person-years, incidence1.17/100 person-years. HBV incidence was significantly lower with ART use: 0.49/100 person-years with ART and 2.3/100 person-years without ART [adjusted HR (aHR) 0.25, 95% CI 0.1-0.5, P < 0.001], and with lamivudine (3TC) use: (0.58/100 person-years) with 3TC and 2.25/100 person-years without 3TC (aHR 0.32, 95% CI0.1-0.7, P =  < 0.007). No new HBV infections occurred among those on tenofovir-based ART. HBV incidence also decreased with HIV RNA suppression: 0.6/100 person-years with 400 copies/ml or less and 4.0/100 person-years with more than 400 copies/ml (aHR, 6.4, 95% CI 2.2-19.0, P < 0.001); and with age: 15-29 years versus 40-50 years (aHR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2-9.0); 30-39 years versus 40-50 years (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 0.9-5.3).

Conclusion: HBV continues to be acquired in adulthood among HIV-positive Ugandans and HBV incidence is dramatically reduced with HBV-active ART. In addition to widespread vaccination, initiation of ART may prevent HBV acquisition among HIV-positive adults in sub-Saharan Africa.

Abstract access 

Cost-effectiveness of CRAG-LFA screening for cryptococcal meningitis among people living with HIV in Uganda.

Ramachandran A(1), Manabe Y(1,)(2), Rajasingham R(3), Shah M(4).141. BMC Infect Dis. 2017 Mar 23;17(1):225. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2325-9.

Background: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) constitutes a significant source of mortality in resource-limited regions. Cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) can be detected in the blood before onset of meningitis. We sought to determine the cost-effectiveness of implementing CRAG screening using the recently developed CRAG lateral flow assay in Uganda compared to current practice without screening.

Methods: A decision-analytic model was constructed to compare two strategies for cryptococcal prevention among people living with HIV with CD4 < 100 in Uganda: No cryptococcal screening vs. CRAG screening with WHO-recommended preemptive treatment for CRAG-positive patients. The model was constructed to reflect primary HIV clinics in Uganda, with a cohort of HIV-infected patients withCD4 < 100 cells/µL. Primary outcomes were expected costs, DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). We evaluated varying levels of programmatic implementation in secondary analysis.

Results: CRAG screening was considered highly cost-effective and was associated with an ICER of $6.14 per DALY averted compared to no screening (95% uncertainty range: $-20.32 to $36.47). Overall, implementation of CRAG screening was projected to cost $1.52 more per person, and was projected to result in a 40% relative reduction in cryptococcal-associated mortality. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, CRAG screening was cost-effective in 100% of scenarios and cost saving (ie cheaper and more effective than no screening) in 30% of scenarios. Secondary analysis projected a total cost of $651 454 for 100%implementation of screening nationally, while averting 1228 deaths compared to no screening.

Conclusion: CRAG screening for PLWH with low CD4 represents excellent value for money with the potential to prevent cryptococcal morbidity and mortality in Uganda.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access

Africa, Asia
China, Nigeria, Uganda
  • share
0 comments.

Anti-malarial effect of HIV protease inhibitors

Effect of antiretroviral therapy on malaria incidence in HIV-infected Ugandan adults.

Kasirye RP, Grosskurth H, Munderi P, Levin J, Anywaine Z, Nunn A, Kamali A, Baisley K. AIDS. 2017 Feb 20;31(4):577-582. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001344.

Introduction: Using the data of a trial on cotrimoxazole (CTX) cessation, we investigated the effect of different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens on the incidence of clinical malaria.

Methods: During the cotrimoxazole cessation trial (ISRCTN44723643), HIV-infected Ugandan adults with CD4 at least 250 cells/µl were randomized to receive either CTX prophylaxis or placebo and were followed for a median of 2.5 years. Blood slides for malaria microscopy were examined at scheduled visits and at unscheduled visits when the participant felt unwell. CD4 cell counts were done 6-monthly. Malaria was defined as fever with a positive blood slide. ART regimens were categorized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) only, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing or protease inhibitor containing. Malaria incidence was calculated using random effects Poisson regression to account for clustering of events.

Results: Malaria incidence in the three ART regimen groups was 9.9 (3.6-27.4), 9.3 (8.3-10.4), and 3.5 (1.6-7.6) per 100 person-years, respectively. Incidence on protease inhibitors was lower than that on the other regimens with the results just reaching significance (adjusted rate ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval = 0.2-1.0, comparing with NNRTI regimens). Stratification by CTX/placebo use gave similar results, without evidence of an interaction between the effects of CTX/placebo use and ART regimen. There was no evidence of an interaction between ART regimen and CD4 cell count.

Conclusion: There was some evidence that protease inhibitor-containing ART regimens may be associated with a lower clinical malaria incidence compared with other regimens. This effect was not modified by CTX use or CD4 cell count. The antimalarial properties of protease inhibitors may have clinical and public health importance.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Editor’s notes: HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) have been shown to kill various life cycle stages of the malaria parasite both in vitro and in vivo at therapeutic drug levels.  A randomized controlled trial in children previously illustrated that PI-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was associated with a lower risk of recurrent malaria compared to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based ART.

This study is the first to present data illustrating a reduction in clinical malaria incidence in adults on a PI-based regimen. The authors used data from the COSTOP trial, which was originally designed to look at the safety of discontinuing trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX, Septrin) in HIV-positive Ugandan adults with a CD4 cell count ≥250 cells/µL. A limitation is that only 4% of study participants were on a PI-based ART regimen, so numbers are small. In addition, the authors were unable to adjust for potential confounders relating to individual health status. However, this analysis is a useful addition to the evidence base, suggesting that PIs may have antimalarial properties of clinical and public health importance, especially settings with high malaria transmission and moderate to high HIV prevalence.

Comorbidity, HIV Treatment
Africa
Uganda
  • share
0 comments.

Is stool testing the answer to the problem of childhood TB diagnosis?

Stool Xpert® MTB/RIF test for the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis at primary clinics in Zimbabwe.

Chipinduro M, Mateveke K, Makamure B, Ferrand RA, Gomo E. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2017 Feb 1;21(2):161-166. doi: 10.5588/ijtld.16.0357.

Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Xpert® MTB/RIF on stool samples from children with clinical suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) at primary care clinics.

Design: A cross-sectional diagnostic evaluation enrolling 5-16 year olds from whom one induced sputum (IS) sample was tested for microbiological TB confirmation. Results of a single stool sample tested using Xpert® were compared against microbiologically confirmed TB, defined as a positive result on sputum microscopy and/or culture and/or IS Xpert®.

Results: Of 222 children enrolled, 218 had complete microbiological results. The median age was 10.6 years (interquartile range 8-13). TB was microbiologically confirmed in 19/218 (8.7%) children. Of these, respectively 5 (26%), 9 (47%) and 15 (79%) were smear-, culture- and IS Xpert®-positive. Stool Xpert® was positive in 13/19 (68%) microbiologically confirmed cases and 4/199 (2%) microbiologically negative cases. Stool Xpert® detected 76.9% (10/13) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and 50% (3/6) of non-HIV-infected children with microbiologically confirmed TB (P = 0.241).

Conclusion: Stool Xpert® is a potential alternative screening test for children with suspected TB if sputum is unavailable. Strategies to optimise the diagnostic yield of stool Xpert® assay need further study.

Abstract  Full-text [free] access 

Xpert® MTB/RIF on Stool is Useful for the Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Young Children with Severe Pulmonary Disease

Walters E, van der Zalm MM, Palmer M, Bosch C, Demers AM, Draper H, Goussard P, Schaaf HS, Friedrich SO, Whitelaw A, Warren R, Gie RP, Hesseling AC. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Jan 31. doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000001563. [Epub ahead of print]

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) continues to result in high morbidity and mortality in children from resource-limited settings. Diagnostic challenges, including resource-intense sputum collection methods and insensitive diagnostic tests, contribute to diagnostic delay and poor outcomes in children. We evaluated the diagnostic utility of stool Xpert® MTB/RIF (Xpert) compared with bacteriologic confirmation (combination of Xpert® and culture of respiratory samples).

Methods: In a hospital-based study in Cape Town, South Africa, we enrolled children younger than 13 years of age with suspected pulmonary TB from April 2012- August 2015. Standard clinical investigations included tuberculin skin test, chest radiograph and HIV testing. Respiratory samples for smear microscopy, Xpert® and liquid culture included gastric aspirates, induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspirates and expectorated sputum. One stool sample per child was collected and tested using Xpert®.

Results: Of 379 children enrolled (median age, 15.9 months, 13.7% HIV-infected), 73 (19.3%) had bacteriologically confirmed TB. The sensitivity and specificity of stool Xpert® vs. overall bacteriologic confirmation were 31.9% (95% CI 21.84-44.50%) and 99.7% (95% CI 98.2-100%) respectively. 23/51 (45.1%) children with bacteriologically confirmed TB with severe disease were stool Xpert® positive. Cavities on chest radiograph were associated with Xpert® stool positivity regardless of age and other relevant factors (OR 7.05; 95% CI 2.16-22.98; p=0.001).

Conclusions: Stool Xpert® can rapidly confirm TB in children who present with radiologic findings suggestive of severe TB. In resource-limited settings where children frequently present with advanced disease, Xpert® on stool samples could improve access to rapid diagnostic confirmation and appropriate treatment.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: It has been known for a long time that Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be detected in stool specimens in some people with pulmonary TB disease. This is because sputum is often swallowed and M. tuberculosis bacilli can survive transit through the gastrointestinal tract. With the challenges of detecting TB in children, and the introduction of molecular diagnostic tools, there has been renewed interest in using stool specimens to improve TB diagnosis.

These two studies from southern Africa evaluated the diagnostic yield and accuracy of Xpert® MTB/RIF testing on stool specimens in children with symptoms compatible with intrathoracic TB. The study populations were different. The children in the South African study were younger than in the Zimbabwean study (median age 16 months vs. 10 years). In South Africa, only one in seven children was HIV positive whereas half the children were HIV positive in the Zimbabwean study. The South African study was conducted at hospital level whereas the Zimbabwean study was at primary health care clinics.

Despite these differences, the main findings were similar. Stool Xpert® was positive in six percent in South Africa and eight percent in Zimbabwe. Sensitivity of stool Xpert® compared to a single culture from induced sputum was 50% in South Africa and 67% in Zimbabwe. A single Xpert® test on stool was no better than a single Xpert® test on induced sputum. There was some evidence from both studies that sensitivity was higher in HIV positive children. However, in South Africa, sensitivity compared to any bacteriological confirmation was substantially lower (32%), as the reference standard included Xpert® and culture tests on multiple specimens. Sensitivity compared to the clinical decision to treat for TB was even lower (14%). This may have reflected the fact that all children in the South African study had chest X-rays and there were several children with intrathoracic lymph node disease.

What does this tell us about the role of Xpert® testing on stool for TB diagnosis in children? The evidence does not seem to provide strong support for scaling up stool Xpert® testing within standard diagnostic algorithms. As the South African study demonstrated, many of the children with positive Xpert® on stool were older children with more severe pulmonary disease. These are the children that may be more likely to produce sputum, and are the ones where we would want to make every effort to get respiratory specimens. This is especially the case in HIV-positive children, among whom there may be many possible diagnoses. Added to all this is the fact that processing and testing stool in the laboratory is not simple, meaning it might be difficult to scale up within decentralised laboratory systems.

It is encouraging that research groups are now addressing the challenge of TB diagnosis in children. It would seem that testing stool specimens for now does not really address the fundamental challenge in children, that they usually have paucibacillary disease often with little or no involvement of the lung parenchyma. The search must go on for better diagnostic tests for TB in children. 

Comorbidity, HIV Treatment
Africa
South Africa, Zimbabwe
  • share
0 comments.

Psychological distress and HIV after financial meltdown in Zimbabwe

Prevalence and associations of psychological distress, HIV Infection and HIV care service utilization in East Zimbabwe.

Tlhajoane M, Eaton JW, Takaruza A, Rhead R, Maswera R, Schur N, Sherr L, Nyamukapa C, Gregson S. AIDS Behav. 2017 Feb 13. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1705-x. [Epub ahead of print]

The correlation between mental health and sexual risk behaviours for HIV infection remains largely unknown in low and middle income settings. The present study determined the prevalence of psychological distress (PD) in a sub-Saharan African population with a generalized HIV epidemic, and investigated associations with HIV acquisition risk and uptake of HIV services using data from a cross-sectional survey of 13,252 adults. PD was measured using the Shona Symptom Questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to measure associations between PD and hypothesized covariates. The prevalence of PD was 4.5% (95% CI 3.9-5.1%) among men, and 12.9% (95% CI 12.2-13.6%) among women. PD was associated with sexual risk behaviours for HIV infection and HIV-infected individuals were more likely to suffer from PD. Amongst those initiated on anti-retroviral therapy, individuals with PD were less likely to adhere to treatment (91 vs. 96%; age- and site-type-adjusted odds ratio = 0.38; 95% CI 0.15, 0.99). Integrated HIV and mental health services may enhance HIV care and treatment outcomes in high HIV-prevalence populations in sub-Saharan Africa.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: Psychological distress can lead to increased use of alcohol and drugs, sexual risk behaviour, and hence increased risk of HIV acquisition. In rural Manicaland, the fifth survey round of an open population cohort measured psychological distress for the first time in 2009-2011, following the Zimbabwe hyperinflation crisis of 2008-2009.

Psychological distress was highly prevalent, especially among women, as was HIV infection. Overall, HIV prevalence was 12.7% in men and 18.3% in women. Psychological distress and HIV were also clearly associated. Among people with psychological distress HIV prevalence was 18.8% for men and 27.2% for women, compared to 12.4% and 17.1% for men and women respectively without psychological distress.

People living with HIV (identified by anonymous testing) who had psychological distress were more likely to have had an HIV test than people without psychological distress, although this could be reversed to mean that people with HIV who knew their status were more likely to have psychological distress than people who did not. If diagnosed and on antiretroviral therapy, people with psychological distress also had poorer adherence, supporting findings of other studies.

A main challenge to interpreting these results is a lack of information on poverty and how it may have impacted both psychological distress and risk of HIV acquisition. Only one survey round used the Shona Symptom Questionnaire so the study is essentially a cross-sectional survey. Women with psychological distress were more likely to have transactional sex, engage in sex work and not use condoms, but it is not clear that these behaviours were consequences of psychological distress. Instead, both the behaviours and the distress could have been caused by poverty constraints and lack of options. The only economic variables measured were time of year (as a proxy for food availability) and employment status (employed/unemployed). Being employed was associated with lower risk of psychological distress for women, but had no effect for men.

Africa
Zimbabwe
  • share
0 comments.