Journal Access

For readers in all countries:

All abstracts in HIV this month are freely available on the Web.

You can access many scientific journals free of charge no matter where you are located, but fo r some journals you do need a subscription to access the full text of an article. Other journals offer free access to full-text articles after a certain period of time - see lists at PubMed Central (http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/) and High Wire Press (http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl).

A number of journals are free to readers in all countries through ScienceDirect (http://www.sciencedirect.com/). Examples of open access journals are BioMed Central journals (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) and Public Library of Science (PLoS) journals (http://medicine.plosjournals.org/).

Open Science Directory (http://www.opensciencedirectory.net/) is a global search tool open access journals and journals in special programmes for developing countries.

For residents of low- and middle-income countries:

The HINARI Access to Research in Health programme, set up by the World Health Organisation (WHO) together with major publishers, enables readers at health institutions in low- and middle-income countries to gain access to one of the world's largest collections of biomedical and health literature. Over 13 000 journal titles are now available to health institutions in 116 countries, benefiting many thousands of health workers and researchers, and in turn, contributing to improved world health. More information on the HINARI programme and eligible countries is available at http://www.who.int/hinari/en/. Local, not-for-profit institutions in low- and middle- income countries may register for access to the journals through HINARI. Institutions in countries with GNP per capita below US$1 600 are eligible for free access. Institutions in countries with GNP per capita US$ 5 000 pay a fee of US$1 000 per year/institution.

There is also free access to journals published online with the assistance of HighWire Press. This link: http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/devecon.dtl will automatically detect if your internet connection is from a developing country and give you free access to their journals.

For employees of UNAIDS or WHO:

If you work for WHO or UNAIDS in Geneva, you can access a number of journals available from the WHO library by going to the WHO intranet https://intranet.who.int/. If you work for UNAIDS outside Geneva you can access the WHO intranet through remote.unaids.org. When you have entered your UNAIDS username and password, click on “intranet” – “WHO”. On the WHO intranet homepage, click on “information resources” - “WHO library” – “online information resources” – “online journals (GIFT)” - “A to Z list” and you will see the list of accessible journals.  However, if you encounter problems, try accessing scientific journals that offer free access to full-text articles as well as through HINARI (see above). If you still can’t get what you are looking for, send an email here with the subject: full-text article, and we will try to assist you.