Treatment of HIV-2, where is the evidence?

Antiretroviral therapy response among HIV-2 infected patients: a systematic review.

Ekouevi DK, Tchounga BK, Coffie PA, Tegbe J, Anderson AM, Gottlieb GS, Vitoria M, Dabis F, Eholie SP. BMC Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 26;14:461. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-14-461.

Methods: Data were extracted from articles that were selected after screening of PubMed/MEDLINE up to November 2012 and abstracts of the 1996-2012 international conferences. Observational cohorts, clinical trials and program reports were eligible as long as they reported data on ART response (clinical, immunological or virological) among HIV-2 infected patients. The determinants investigated included patients' demographic characteristics, CD4 cell count at baseline and ART received.

Results: Seventeen reports (involving 976 HIV-2 only and 454 HIV1&2 dually reactive patients) were included in the final review, and the analysis presented in this report are related to HIV-2 infected patients only in 17 reports. There was no randomized controlled trial and only two cohorts had enrolled more than 100 HIV-2 only infected patients. The median CD4 count at ART initiation was 165 cells /mm3, [IQR; 137-201] and the median age at ART initiation was 44 years (IQR: 42-48 years). Ten studies included 103 patients treated with three nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). Protease inhibitor (PI) based regimens were reported by 16 studies. Before 2009, the most frequent PIs used were Nelfinavir and Indinavir, whereas it was Lopinavir/ritonavir thereafter. The immunological response at month-12 was reported in six studies and the mean CD4 cell count increase was +118 cells /µL (min-max: 45-200 cells/µL).

Conclusion: Overall clinical and immuno-virologic outcomes in HIV-2 infected individuals treated with ART are suboptimal. There is a need of randomized controlled trials to improve the management and outcomes of people living with HIV-2 infection.

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Editor’s notes: HIV-2 accounts for between 10-20% of HIV infections in West Africa. With a longer asymptomatic period, lower plasma viral load and slower decline in CD4 count, it is often seen as a less aggressive virus than HIV-1. However, people with HIV-2 still experience clinical progression and AIDS-related deaths. WHO recommends initiating a boosted protease inhibitor regimen or a triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI)-based regimen in people living with HIV-2 when their CD4 count falls below 500 cells/mm3. However, as clearly demonstrated in this systematic review, the evidence underlying when to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the optimal treatment options for people living with HIV-2, is weak. Only 17 observational studies (15 cohort studies and two case series) were identified. Overall immune recovery was sub-optimal and, given the small sample sizes of these studies, there was limited power to detect any differences in outcomes by treatment regimen. Further evidence is urgently needed to guide optimal treatment of people living with HIV-2. 

Africa, Asia, Europe, Northern America
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