Assessing risk behaviour and uptake of HIV care using an online network among MSM in Latin America

Engagement in HIV care and sexual transmission risk behavior among men who have sex with men using online social/sexual networking in Latin America.

Magidson JF, Biello KB, Safren SA, Rosenberger JG, Novak DS, Mayer KH, Mimiaga MJ. AIDS Care. 2015 Mar 4:1-8. [Epub ahead of print]

HIV/AIDS in Latin America is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, accurate estimates of engagement in HIV care in this population can be difficult to ascertain because many do not self-identify as MSM. Given evidence of decreased HIV transmissibility in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, identifying individuals not in care who are engaging in HIV transmission risk behavior is crucial for secondary prevention. Primary aims of this study were to examine engagement in care from testing to ART adherence among MSM using online social/sexual networking across Latin America, and whether individuals not in care at each step reported greater sexual transmission risk behavior than those in care. In the overall sample (n = 28 779), approximately 75% reported ever being tested for HIV, and 9% reported having received an HIV diagnosis. Among known HIV-infected individuals, 20% reported not being in care, 30% reported not taking ART, and 55% reported less than 100% ART adherence. Over one-third of HIV-infected individuals reported sexual HIV transmission risk behavior, defined as unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with a male partner of different/unknown HIV serostatus in the past three months. HIV-infected individuals not engaged in care more often reported UAI compared to those in care (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01-1.66). Although not statistically significant, HIV-infected individuals not on ART more often reported UAI compared to those on ART (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 0.94-1.47). Individuals who reported less than 100% ART adherence more often reported UAI compared to individuals with 100% adherence (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.26-1.90). Findings demonstrate that a substantial portion of HIV-infected MSM in Latin America who are likely not virologically suppressed from lack of ART use or adherence report sexual HIV transmission risk. Tailoring secondary HIV prevention for MSM in Latin America who are not in HIV care or adherent to ART may be warranted.

Abstract access

Editor’s notes: The prevalence of HIV among gay men and other men who have sex with men in Latin America and the Caribbean is among the highest in the world. Stigma and discrimination towards gay men and other men who have sex with men  in these settings mean that many do not reveal their sexual preference, do not acknowledge their HIV risk, and do not access HIV diagnosis, care and treatment. This paper describes a large cross-sectional study of almost 30 000 gay men and other men who have sex with men from 17 countries in Latin America, recruited via a social/sexual networking website that they had recently used. The study highlights the substantial difficulty in fully engaging gay men and other men who have sex with men living with HIV, into treatment and care services in this region. This in turn contributes to high HIV prevalence and incidence, through unsafe sexual behaviour and unsuppressed viral load in gay men and other men who have sex with men living with HIV. The authors note that the highest proportion of participants receiving HIV care lived in Brazil, where national efforts have been made to reduce homophobia and to include gay men and other men who have sex with men in HIV prevention initiatives. Similar efforts are required in other Latin American countries if their high levels of HIV transmission in these communities, are to be reduced. This includes innovative methods such as using social networking sites as a platform for delivering programmes.  

Latin America
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