Invasive cervical cancers preventable by HPV vaccines: a comparison of HIV-positive and negative women

Effect of HIV infection on human papillomavirus types causing invasive cervical cancer in Africa.

Clifford GM, de Vuyst H, Tenet V, Plummer M, Tully S, Franceschi S. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016 Nov 1;73(3):332-339.

Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type.

Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa.

Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR).

Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV.

Conclusions: HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection.

Abstract access  

Editor’s notes: Invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is one of the most common cancers in low and middle income countries. In the African region the prevalence of both ICC and HIV are high. Compared to HIV-negative women, HIV-positive women are at increased risk of oncogenic high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) incidence and persistence, and cervical lesion incidence and progression. Current HPV vaccines offer potential for cervical cancer prevention by targeting the HR-HPV types associated with ICC. Although there is no data yet available on HPV vaccine efficacy among HIV-positive persons, HPV vaccines have been reported to be safe and immunogenic in HIV-positive children, female adolescents and adults. 

This systematic review compared the HPV type distribution and the HPV vaccine type distribution in ICC biopsy and cervical cell specimens of 770 HIV-positive and 3846 HIV-negative women from 21 studies in 12 African countries.

The authors report that the fraction of ICC attributable to the HPV types included in the current bivalent (HPV16/18) and nonavalent (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was similar among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women (bivalent: 61.7% and 67.3%; nonavalent: 88.9% and 89.5%, respectively). However, a non-negligible proportion of ICC from both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women were infected with non-vaccine types in the absence of any of the vaccine types (7.0% and 7.9% of ICC from HIV-positive and HIV-negative women, respectively), and this was highest for HPV35.

These findings confirm that the currently available HPV vaccines could prevent a similar proportion of ICC cases in HIV-positive as in HIV-negative women. ICC remains an important co-morbidity among HIV-positive women even in the antiretroviral era. Given that HIV-positive women are at greater risk of HR-HPV persistence and cervical lesion incidence and faster progression to high-grade cervical lesions, primary prevention of HPV infection through vaccination could reduce HPV infection and HPV-associated disease in Africa. However, cervical cancer screening will continue to remain important for both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women as there remain a proportion of ICC cases that may not be preventable by currently available vaccines. 

Comorbidity, Epidemiology
Africa
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