Patient navigators and financial incentives have no effect on HIV viral suppression in people with substance use disorders

Effect of patient navigation with or without financial incentives on viral suppression among hospitalized patients with HIV infection and substance use: a randomized clinical trial.  

Metsch LR, Feaster DJ, Gooden L, Matheson T, Stitzer M, Das M, Jain MK, Rodriguez AE, Armstrong WS, Lucas GM, Nijhawan AE, Drainoni ML, Herrera P, Vergara-Rodriguez P, Jacobson JM, Mugavero MJ, Sullivan M, Daar ES, McMahon DK, Ferris DC, Lindblad R, VanVeldhuisen P, Oden N, Castellon PC, Tross S, Haynes LF, Douaihy A, Sorensen JL, Metzger DS, Mandler RN, Colfax GN, del Rio C. JAMA. 2016 Jul 12;316(2):156-70. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.8914.

Importance: Substance use is a major driver of the HIV epidemic and is associated with poor HIV care outcomes. Patient navigation (care coordination with case management) and the use of financial incentives for achieving predetermined outcomes are interventions increasingly promoted to engage patients in substance use disorders treatment and HIV care, but there is little evidence for their efficacy in improving HIV-1 viral suppression rates.

Objective: To assess the effect of a structured patient navigation intervention with or without financial incentives to improve HIV-1 viral suppression rates among patients with elevated HIV-1 viral loads and substance use recruited as hospital inpatients.

Design, setting, and participants: From July 2012 through January 2014, 801 patients with HIV infection and substance use from 11 hospitals across the United States were randomly assigned to receive patient navigation alone (n = 266), patient navigation plus financial incentives (n = 271), or treatment as usual (n = 264). HIV-1 plasma viral load was measured at baseline and at 6 and 12 months.

Interventions: Patient navigation included up to 11 sessions of care coordination with case management and motivational interviewing techniques over 6 months. Financial incentives (up to $1160) were provided for achieving targeted behaviors aimed at reducing substance use, increasing engagement in HIV care, and improving HIV outcomes. Treatment as usual was the standard practice at each hospital for linking hospitalized patients to outpatient HIV care and substance use disorders treatment.

Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome was HIV viral suppression (200 copies/mL) relative to viral nonsuppression or death at the 12-month follow-up.

Results: Of 801 patients randomized, 261 (32.6%) were women (mean [SD] age, 44.6 years [10.0 years]). There were no differences in rates of HIV viral suppression versus nonsuppression or death among the 3 groups at 12 months. Eighty-five of 249 patients (34.1%) in the usual-treatment group experienced treatment success compared with 89 of 249 patients (35.7%) in the navigation-only group for a treatment difference of 1.6% (95% CI, -6.8% to 10.0%; P = .80) and compared with 98 of 254 patients (38.6%) in the navigation-plus-incentives group for a treatment difference of 4.5% (95% CI -4.0% to 12.8%; P = .68). The treatment difference between the navigation-only and the navigation-plus-incentives group was -2.8% (95% CI, -11.3% to 5.6%; P = .68).

Conclusions and relevance: Among hospitalized patients with HIV infection and substance use, patient navigation with or without financial incentives did not have a beneficial effect on HIV viral suppression relative to nonsuppression or death at 12 months vs treatment as usual. These findings do not support these interventions in this setting. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01612169.

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Editor’s notes: Substance use in people living with HIV has consistently been shown to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. Within this population, management often requires a combination of treatment for both HIV and substance use disorders. It is evident that it is the poor engagement in one or both of these treatment approaches that contributes significantly to poor clinical outcomes. The author’s group aimed to fill a gap in current evidence and explore whether two activities, patient navigation and financial incentives, could potentially motivate engagement with both treatment approaches and ultimately improve HIV viral suppression.

This study tested, among people living with HIV in hospital,  with substance use disorders, six months of patient navigation alone (care co-ordination and case management), or six months of patient navigation alongside a financial incentive plan. While overall uptake and retention to the programme schedules were high, no differences in HIV-1 viral suppression rates (which were generally poor) or death by 12 months were noted.

One factor that must be highlighted is that the participation in actual substance use treatment programmes post hospital discharge was low across all groups (average 24.8%), primarily due to a lack of available services in the regions. It may be that the programme may have been more effective in a different population of people already established in substance use treatment programmes, or if treatment had been more easily accessible.

The study serves as a reminder that such key populations are extremely vulnerable with a number of comorbidities and competing priorities. While not supporting health care navigation or financial incentives in their defined setting, the study findings emphasise a need to develop and tailor, cost-effective activities to improve health outcomes in this group.

Northern America
United States of America
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