Men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of the evidence

Emerging themes for sensitivity training modules of African healthcare workers attending to men who have sex with men: a systematic review.

Dijkstra M, van der Elst EM, Micheni M, Gichuru E, Musyoki H, Duby Z, Lange JM, Graham SM, Sanders EJ. Int Health. 2015 May;7(3):151-162. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Sensitivity training of front-line African health care workers (HCWs) attending to men who have sex with men (MSM) is actively promoted through national HIV prevention programming in Kenya. Over 970 Kenyan-based HCWs have completed an eight-modular online training free of charge (http://www.marps-africa.org [1]) since its creation in 2011. Before updating these modules, we performed a systematic review of published literature of MSM studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) in the period 2011-2014, to investigate if recent studies provided: important new knowledge currently not addressed in existing online modules; contested information of existing module topics; or added depth to topics covered already. We used learning objectives of the eight existing modules to categorise data from the literature. If data could not be categorised, new modules were suggested. Our review identified 142 MSM studies with data from sSA, including 34 studies requiring module updates, one study contesting current content, and 107 studies reinforcing existing module content. ART adherence and community engagement were identified as new modules. Recent MSM studies conducted in sSA provided new knowledge, contested existing information, and identified new areas of MSM service needs currently unaddressed in the online training.

Abstract [2]  Full-text [free] access [3]

Editor’s notes: Same sex practices remain criminalised in sub-Saharan Africa. Gay men and other men who have sex with men face stigma, discrimination, harassment and arrest. Health care workers frequently have no training on issues affecting gay men and other men who have sex with men and are ill-prepared to work sensitively with them. Together these can deter these men from accessing health care and HIV/STI services, increasing their risk of HIV and other poor health outcomes.

This study conducted a systematic review of gay men and other men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa. The findings were used to update an on-line training programme for health care workers in Kenya. This previously comprised modules on i) men who have sex with men and HIV in Africa ii) homophobia: stigma and its effects; iii) sexual identity, coming out and disclosure; iv) anal sex and common sexual practices; v) HIV and STIs; vi) condom and lubricant use; vii) mental health: anxiety, depression and substance use; and viii) risk-reduction counselling. The review updated the training programme with new evidence and two new modules were introduced: ix) ART adherence; and x) community engagement.

Health care workers play a crucial role in reducing stigma and discrimination facing gay men and other men who have sex with men. This systematic review provided a valuable step in updating an important, accessible training programme [1]. Reducing homoprejudice and ensuring health care workers have accurate and up-to-date knowledge are key to improving service uptake by gay men and other men who have sex with men.

Africa [9], Asia [10], Latin America [11], Northern America [12]
Botswana [13], Brazil [14], Cameroon [15], Ecuador [16], Gambia [17], Guinea Conakry [18], Guinea-Bissau [19], India [20], Kenya [21], Malawi [22], Namibia [23], Nigeria [24], Peru [25], Senegal [26], South Africa [27], Thailand [28], Uganda [29], Ukraine [30], United Republic of Tanzania [31], United States of America [32]
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