Improved survival with lymphoma in the antiretroviral therapy era

Evolution of HIV-associated lymphoma over 3 decades.

Ramaswami R, Chia G, Dalla Pria A, Pinato DJ, Parker K, Nelson M, Bower M. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016 Jun 1;72(2):177-83. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000946.

Introduction: The emergence of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and improvements in the management of opportunistic infections have altered the HIV epidemic over the last 30 years. We aimed to assess changes to the biology and outcomes of HIV-associated lymphomas over this period at the national center for HIV oncology in the United Kingdom.

Methods: Clinical characteristics at lymphoma diagnosis have been prospectively collected since 1986, along with details of lymphoma treatment and outcomes. The clinical features and outcomes were compared between 3 decades: pre-cART decade (1986-1995), early-cART decade (1996-2005), and late-cART decade (2006-2015).

Results: A total of 615 patients with HIV-associated lymphoma were included in the study: 158 patients in the pre-cART era, 200 patients in the early-cART era, and 257 patients in the late-cART era. In more recent decades, patients were older (P < 0.0001) and had higher CD4 cell counts (P < 0.0001) at lymphoma diagnosis. Over time, there has also been a shift in lymphoma histological subtypes, with an increase in lymphoma subtypes associated with moderate immunosuppression. The overall survival for patients with HIV-associated lymphoma has dramatically improved over the 3 decades (P < 0.0001).

Conclusion: Over the last 30 years, the clinical demographic of HIV-associated lymphomas has evolved, and the outcomes have improved.

Abstract access [1]

Editor’s notes: Lymphomas are the second most common malignancy after Kaposi’s sarcoma among people living with HIV in Europe, Australia and northern America. This study examined how the biology and rates of survival have changed since combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) became available.

People living with HIV and diagnosed with lymphoma over the past thirty years in a specialist oncology centre in the United Kingdom were included in the study. The mean age at diagnosis of lymphoma increased over time, most likely reflecting improvement in life expectancy with cART. As would be expected, the mean CD4 count and the proportion of people with a suppressed viral load at lymphoma diagnosis increased, while proportion with an AIDS-defining illness before lymphoma diagnosis declined significantly.  

This study demonstrated a shift of the histological subtypes of lymphoma that are associated with less severe immunosuppression, for example the proportion of primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which are associated with severe immunosuppression, declined, while the proportion of Burkitt’s lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (associated with less profound immunosuppression) increased.

A key finding of this study was the significantly improved overall survival of people with lymphoma. The improved survival is not explained by changes in histological subtypes of lymphoma over time, as improvement in prognosis was observed for each histological subtype. The substantial improvement in overall survival is attributable to a number of factors. They include the availability of cART, attention to opportunistic infection prophylaxis, improved supportive care for people undergoing lymphoma treatment as well as improved modalities of lymphoma treatment. Such modalities include efficacious drugs that can be safely co-administered with cART, e.g., rituximab, novel agents and use of autologous stem cell transplants.  

Europe [8]
United Kingdom [9]
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