Access improved to HIV testing through peer administered oral fluid HIV tests in key populations in Brazil

Point-of-care HIV tests done by peers, Brazil.

Pascom AR, Dutra de Barros CH, Lobo TD, Pasini EN, Comparini RA, Caldas de Mesquita F. Bull World Health Organ. 2016 Aug 1; 94(8): 626–630.

Problem: Early diagnosis of infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed - especially among key populations such as sex workers, transgender people, men who have sex with men and people who use drugs.

Approach: The Brazilian Ministry of Health developed a strategy called Viva Melhor Sabendo ("live better knowing") to increase HIV testing among key populations. In partnership with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), a peer point-of-care testing intervention, using an oral fluid rapid test, was introduced at social venues for key populations at different times of the day.

Local setting: Key populations in Brazil can have 40 times higher HIV prevalence than the general population (14.8% versus 0.4%).

Relevant changes: Legislation was reinterpreted, so that oral fluid rapid tests could be administered by any person trained in rapid testing by the health ministry. Between January 2014 and March 2015, 29 723 oral fluid tests were administered; 791 (2.7%) were positive. Among the key populations, transgender people had the greatest proportion of positive results (10.7%; 172/1612), followed by men who declared themselves as commercial sex workers (8.7%; 165/1889) and men who have sex with men (4.8%; 292/6055).

Lessons learnt: The strategy improved access to HIV testing. Testing done by peers at times and locations suitable for key populations increased acceptance of testing. Working with relevant NGOs is a useful approach when reaching out to these key populations.

Abstract [1]  Full-text [free] access  [2]

Editor’s notes: Brazil was a pioneer in provision of universal access to ART, adopting universal treatment for all people living with HIV in 2013. The HIV epidemic in Brazil is largely concentrated in key populations, where early treatment is less likely to be initiated than in the general population. In this report, the authors describe the results of a new strategy to allow trained peers from 53 non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to conduct rapid HIV screening tests using oral fluid tests, and refer clients with positive results for treatment. Key features were the full ownership of the testing implementation by the NGOs, extension of testing to social venues, and the matching of testers and clients by demographic characteristics. About half of the clients (53%) were first-time testers, providing clear evidence of the success of this new strategy. Future work should describe how individual NGOs revised their strategy over time, which NGOs were more successful in reaching key populations, and which NGOs were more successful in referring clients with positive results for test confirmation and treatment.

Latin America [8]
Brazil [9]
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