Adolescents’ concerns: psychosocial needs of young people living with HIV in Thailand

Psychosocial needs of perinatally HIV-infected youths in Thailand: lessons learnt from instructive counseling.

Manaboriboon B, Lolekha R, Chokephaibulkit K, Leowsrisook P, Naiwatanakul T, Tarugsa J, Durier Y, Aunjit N, Punpanich Vandepitte W, Boon-Yasidhi V. AIDS Care. 2016 Dec;28(12):1615-1622. Epub 2016 Jun 26.

Identifying psychosocial needs of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV) youth is a key step in ensuring good mental health care. We report psychosocial needs of pHIV youth identified using the "Youth Counseling Needs Survey" (YCS) and during individual counseling (IC) sessions. pHIV youth receiving care at two tertiary-care hospitals in Bangkok or at an orphanage in Lopburi province were invited to participate IC sessions. The youths' psychosocial needs were assessed using instructive IC sessions in four main areas: general health, reproductive health, mood, and psychosocial concerns. Prior to the IC session youth were asked to complete the YCS in which their concerns in the four areas were investigated. Issues identified from the YCS and the IC sessions were compared. During October 2010-July 2011, 150 (68.2%) of 220 eligible youths participated in the IC sessions and completed the YCS. Median age was 14 (range 11-18) years and 92 (61.3%) were female. Mean duration of the IC sessions was 36.5 minutes. One-hundred and thirty (86.7%) youths reported having at least one psychosocial problem discovered by either the IC session or the YCS. The most common problems identified during the IC session were poor health attitude and self-care (48.0%), lack of life skills (44.0%), lack of communication skills (40.0%), poor antiretroviral (ARV) adherence (38.7%), and low self-value (34.7%). The most common problems identified by the YCS were lack of communication skills (21.3%), poor health attitude and self-care (14.0%), and poor ARV adherence (12.7%). Youth were less likely to report psychosocial problems in the YCS than in the IC session. Common psychosocial needs among HIV-infected youth were issues about life skills, communication skills, knowledge on self-care, ARV adherence, and self-value. YCS can identify pHIV youths' psychosocial needs but might underestimate issues. Regular IC sessions are useful to detect problems and provide opportunities for counseling.

Abstract access   [1]

Editor’s notes: The study reports on the psychological needs of young people who acquired HIV in the perinatal period.  The needs were highlighted during counselling sessions and in a survey conducted as part of the Happy-Teen Programme in Thailand. Young people (age 11-18) who have perinatally acquired HIV were recruited in two hospitals and from a service run by an orphanage linked to one of the hospitals. Young people took part in two individual ‘instructive counselling’ sessions, and two survey sessions for a needs-assessment questionnaire. Participants reported higher levels of needs in the counselling sessions compared to the questionnaire. Key areas of need identified included: health attitudes and self-care (e.g., diet, sleep, drug use); issues with sexual risk and difficulties communicating with sexual partners; HIV treatment adherence problems; concerns about HIV-associated stigma; and concerns about peer pressure. The study illustrates the difference in the quality of findings obtained from data collected via the questionnaire in comparison with data collected via sessions with counsellors. The counsellors were people that the young people knew for some time and trusted. The study highlights the importance of counselling with young people to improve self-esteem and health-associated behaviours.  Counsellors are also important to provide referrals for more severe mental health issues. 

Asia [9]
Thailand [10]
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