Measuring adherence – a promising approach with caregivers of children living with HIV

Improved adherence to antiretroviral therapy observed among HIV-infected children whose caregivers had positive beliefs in medicine in sub-Saharan Africa.

Abongomera G, Cook A, Musiime V, Chabala C, Lamorde M, Abach J, Thomason M, Mulenga V, Kekitiinwa A, Colebunders R, Kityo C, Walker AS, Gibb DM. AIDS Behav. 2017 Feb;21(2):441-449. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1582-8.

A high level of adherence to antiretroviral treatment is essential for optimal clinical outcomes in HIV infection, but measuring adherence is difficult. We investigated whether responses to a questionnaire eliciting caregiver beliefs in medicines were associated with adherence of their child (median age 2.8 years), and whether this in turn was associated with viral suppression. We used the validated beliefs in medicine questionnaire (BMQ) to measure caregiver beliefs, and medication event monitoring system caps to measure adherence. We found significant associations between BMQ scores and adherence, and between adherence and viral suppression. Among children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), we also found significant associations between BMQ 'necessity' scores, and BMQ 'necessity-concerns' scores, and later viral suppression. This suggests that the BMQ may be a valuable tool when used alongside other adherence measures, and that it remains important to keep caregivers well informed about the long-term necessity of their child's ART.

Abstract [1]  Full-text [free] access  [2]

Editor’s notes: How we measure adherence to antiretroviral therapy has long been a challenge within HIV clinical care. We need to know who is struggling with their HIV treatment so that we can provide support to improve their treatment taking behaviour before treatment resistance and other complex clinical problems take hold. This can be an especially relevant concern for children who will need to take HIV treatment throughout their lives. The analysis within this paper proffers a relatively accessible means to identify families who are more likely to encounter adherence problems. This potentially allows people to receive pre-emptive support before clinical problems arise. 

The authors tested their hypothesis that the children of caregivers who had concerns about the overuse and associated toxicity of medicine and/or had strong beliefs in divine intervention as curative, relative to their belief in the necessity of medicines, would be less likely to be virally suppressed. Such beliefs were measured in a validated ‘belief in medicine’ questionnaire. Although this was used within a clinical trial setting it is potentially simple enough to feasibly be used in more general clinical settings. This measure could identify particular ‘at-risk’ caregiver groups to inform not only the provision of tailored adherence support but also at which critical time points such support should be delivered.

Africa [7]
Uganda [8], Zambia [9]
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