Do people living with HIV live well with HIV in the era of antiretroviral therapy?

Editor’s notes: As treatment for HIV becomes increasingly widespread, and HIV-related deaths continue to decline, more and more attention is being paid to chronic non-communicable diseases and to the overall quality of life of people living with HIV.  However, despite 71% of people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa there is little research on the impact of illness and treatment on quality of life in the region.

Nyongesa and colleagues provide a fascinating mixed methods study, nested within a larger study of children and adolescents with HIV, which begins to formulate and validate a culturally appropriate tool to measure quality of life in the Swahili speaking population of coastal Kenya.  They used the functional assessment of HIV infection (FAHI) questionnaire as the starting point.  This is an HIV specific adaptation of a tool initially used among people with cancer and widely validated and studied in European and US based populations. 47 questions are used to assess HIV-specific quality of life in five domains: physical; emotional; functional and global well being; social; and cognitive functioning.

Following a scoping literature review, the authors used qualitative interviews with 38 participants living with HIV (largely female [27]) to explore their perceptions of the impact of HIV in the day-to-day life of people living with HIV in general. The issues raised overlapped with all the domains of FAHI except cognitive functioning, which the authors suggest is perhaps under-recognized when there are many competing stressors on people’s lives.  The participants then answered a draft version of the FAHI, which had been translated, back translated and reviewed in a group to ensure comprehension and relevance.  Following adaptation, the FAHI Swahili version was then administered to a sample of 103 randomly selected study participants living with HIV and on antiretroviral therapy from the same study site.  The sample was almost entirely female (94%) reflecting their availability at the parent study centre, which focussed on children and adolescents living with HIV.  Overall, the authors conclude that the new adaptation of the tool seems appropriate for further research studies on quality of life among people living with HIV on treatment in East Africa.  While the study provides a great example of a serious approach to develop, standardize and validate a culturally appropriate tool, the qualitative results also provide considerable insight into the many ways in which HIV affects these Kenyan’s lives beyond the purely medical.  Well worth reading the open access paper.

A study in Europe focussed specifically on the health-related domain of quality of life in Amsterdam.  Langebeek and colleagues used two tools that are well validated in European settings to assess physical and mental health related quality of life in 541 individuals living with HIV and 526 control participants without HIV.  HIV infection was clearly associated with worse quality of life, both mental and physical despite most participants being well controlled on ART.  As we might expect,  people who had multiple co-morbidities were less likely to have a good quality of life regardless of HIV status, but HIV remained an independent predictor of poor quality of life.  For mental health, HIV and younger age were both independently associated with less good quality of life.  The clear message is that we need to look beyond antiretroviral therapy and provide good holistic care including both mental and physical health services for people living with HIV, particularly as the population gets older.

A related study from Gonciulea and colleagues shows that among older men living with HIV, there is a significant increase in the risk of osteoporosis related fractures.  Bone demineralization is known to occur with risk factors such as age, sex, and low body mass index (BMI).However, increasingly studies are showing that HIV-related factors, such as antiretroviral medicines, ongoing viral replication and ongoing inflammation, are also potential risk factors. The authors used the multicenter AIDS cohort study to compare fracture incidence rates among 1221 men living with HIV and 1408 HIV-negative men.  Both cohorts were aged over 40 years.  As expected, fractures occurred more commonly as people got older, but the people living with HIV developed more fractures at an earlier age.  This study therefore reinforces the previous one, with the possibility to offer osteoporosis screening to men over the age of 50 who are living with HIV.

Petraglia and colleagues also explored the challenge of osteoporosis in people living with HIV.  Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is known to be associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and greater fracture risk in HIV negative smokers. In fact the finding of emphysema alone on CT imaging is a strong, independent predictor of osteoporosis in this group. We are beginning to observe obstructive lung disease as a common comorbidity in people living with HIV and emphysema has been shown to occur at an earlier age with less tobacco exposure in HIV positive smokers.  The authors therefore aimed to determine whether CT scans alone could predict who would turn out to have osteoporosis among people living with HIV.  As expected, they found that, among 164 people living with HIV, age; smoking and emphysema on CT scan were all associated with reduced BMD in the thoracic spine (estimated from the CT scan).  However, they also found that the emphysematous changes were an independent marker for this measure of osteoporosis regardless of age, sex, smoking, and use of antiretroviral medicines or steroids.  If a CT scan or lung function test suggests obstructive airways disease or emphysema, we should have a higher index of suspicion for osteoporosis among people living with HIV.

A mixed methods approach to adapting and evaluating the functional assessment of HIV infection (FAHI), Swahili version, for use with low literacy populations.

Nyongesa MK, Sigilai A, Hassan AS, Thoya J, Odhiambo R, Van de Vijver FJ, Newton CR, Abubakar A. PLoS One. 2017 Apr 5;12(4):e0175021. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175021. eCollection 2017.

Background: Despite bearing the largest HIV-related burden, little is known of the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. One of the factors contributing to this gap in knowledge is the lack of culturally adapted and validated measures of HRQoL that are relevant for this setting.

Aims: We set out to adapt the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) Questionnaire, an HIV-specific measure of HRQoL, and evaluate its internal consistency and validity.

Methods: The three phase mixed-methods study took place in a rural setting at the Kenyan Coast. Phase one involved a scoping review to describe the evidence base of the reliability and validity of FAHI as well as the geographical contexts in which it has been administered. Phase two involved in-depth interviews (n = 38) to explore the content validity, and initial piloting for face validation of the adapted FAHI. Phase three was quantitative (n = 103) and evaluated the internal consistency, convergent and construct validities of the adapted interviewer-administered questionnaire.

Results: In the first phase of the study, we identified 16 studies that have used the FAHI. Most (82%) were conducted in North America. Only seven (44%) of the reviewed studies reported on the psychometric properties of the FAHI. In the second phase, most of the participants (37 out of 38) reported satisfaction with word clarity and content coverage whereas 34 (89%) reported satisfaction with relevance of the items, confirming the face validity of the adapted questionnaire during initial piloting. Our participants indicated that HIV impacted on their physical, functional, emotional, and social wellbeing. Their responses overlapped with items in four of the five subscales of the FAHI Questionnaire establishing its content validity. In the third phase, the internal consistency of the scale was found to be satisfactory with subscale Cronbach's α ranging from 0.55 to 0.78. The construct and convergent validity of the tool were supported by acceptable factor loadings for most of the items on the respective sub-scales and confirmation of expected significant correlations of the FAHI subscale scores with scores of a measure of common mental disorders.

Conclusion: The adapted interviewer-administered Swahili version of FAHI questionnaire showed initial strong evidence of good psychometric properties with satisfactory internal consistency and acceptable validity (content, face, and convergent validity). It gives impetus for further validation work, especially construct validity, in similar settings before it can be used for research and clinical purposes in the entire East African region.

Abstract [1] Full-text [free] access  [2]

Impact of co-morbidity and aging on health-related quality of life in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals.

Langebeek N, Kooij KW, Wit FW, Stolte IG, Sprangers MAG, Reiss P, Nieuwkerk PT; AGEhIV Cohort Study Group. AIDS. 2017 Apr 19. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001511. [Epub ahead of print].

Background: HIV-infected individuals may be at risk for the premature onset of age-associated non-communicable co-morbidities. Being HIV-positive, having comorbidities and being of higher age may adversely impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated the possible contribution of HIV infection, co-morbidities, and age on HRQL and depression.

Methods: HIV-infected individuals and uninfected controls from the AGEhIV Cohort Study were screened for the presence of co-morbidities. They completed the Short Form 36-item Health Survey to assess HRQL and the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire to assess depression. Linear and logistic regression were used to investigate to which extent co-morbidities, aging and HIV infection were independently associated with HRQL and depression.

Results: HIV-infected individuals (n = 541) reported significantly worse physical and mental HRQL and had a higher prevalence of depression than HIV-uninfected individuals (n = 526). A higher number of co-morbidities and HIV-positive status were each independently associated with worse physical HRQL, whereas HIV-positive status and younger age were independently associated with worse mental HRQL and more depression. The difference in physical HRQL between HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals did not become greater with a higher number of co-morbidities or with higher age.

Conclusions: In a cohort of largely well-suppressed HIV-positive participants and HIV-negative controls, HIV-positive status was significantly and independently associated with worse physical and mental HRQL and with an increased likelihood of depression. Our finding that a higher number of co-morbidities was independently associated with worse physical HRQL reinforces the importance to optimize prevention and management of co-morbidities as the HIV-infected population continues to age.

Abstract access  [3]

 An increased rate of fracture occurs a decade earlier in HIV+ compared to HIV- men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS).

Gonciulea A, Wang R, Althoff KN, Palella FJ, Lake J, Kingsley LA, Brown TT. AIDS. 2017 Apr 3. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001493 [Epub ahead of print].

Objectives: To determine the incidence and age-related fracture risk among HIV-infected (HIV+) and uninfected men (HIV-). To evaluate factors independently associated with fracture risk.

Design: Prospective, multicenter cohort study of men with or at risk for HIV.

Methods: Outcome measures: 1) all fractures (excluding skull, face, digits) and 2) fragility fractures (vertebral column, femur, wrist, humerus) were collected semiannually in 1221 HIV+ and 1408 HIV- men ≥ age 40. Adjusted incident rate ratios (aIRR) with an interaction term for age (40-49, 50-59, ≥60 years) and HIV serostatus were estimated with Poisson regression models accounting for additional risk factors.

Results: Fracture incidence increased with age among both HIV+ and HIV- men. While there was no significant difference in fracture incidence by HIV serostatus among men aged 40-49 years, the HIV+ men aged 50-59 years had a significantly higher incidence of all fractures (aIRR = 2.06 [1.49, 2.84]) and fragility fractures (aIRR = 2.06 [1.21, 3.50]) compared with HIV- participants of similar age. HIV modified the effect of age on all fractures (p = 0.002) but did not significantly modify the effect for fragility fractures (p = 0.135). Hypertension increased the rate of all fractures by 32% after adjustment for covariates (aIRR = 1.32 [1.04, 1.69]).

Conclusions: Fracture incidence increased with age among HIV+ and HIV- men but was higher among HIV+ men. A significant increase in fracture incidence was found among 50-59-year-old HIV+ men, highlighting the importance of osteoporosis screening for HIV infected men above the age of 50.

Abstract access [4] 

Emphysema is associated with thoracic vertebral bone attenuation on chest CT scan in HIV-infected individuals.

Petraglia A, Leader JK, Gingo M, Fitzpatrick M, Ries J, Kessinger C, Lucht L, Camp D, Morris A, Bon J. PLoS One. 2017 Apr 27;12(4):e0176719. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176719. eCollection 2017.

Background: Age-related chronic diseases are prevalent in HIV-infected persons in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. Bone mineral density (BMD) loss and emphysema have separately been shown to occur at a younger age and with lesser risk exposure in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. In non-HIV infected smokers, emphysema has been shown to independently predict low BMD. We hypothesized that emphysema would independently associate with thoracic vertebral bone attenuation, a surrogate for bone mineral density, in HIV-infected individuals.

Methods: Clinical, pulmonary function, and radiographic data were analyzed for 164 individuals from the University of Pittsburgh's HIV Lung Research Center cohort. Chest CT scans were used to quantify emphysema and compute Hounsfield Unit (HU) attenuation of the 4th, 7th, and 10th thoracic vertebrae. The association between mean HU attenuation values across the three vertebrae and radiographic emphysema, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), steroid use, viral load, CD4 count, and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: In univariate analysis, mean HU attenuation decreased with increasing age (p<0.001), pack years (p = 0.047), and percent emphysema (p<0.001). In a multivariable model, including pack years, age, sex, ART and steroid use, greater emphysema was independently associated with this surrogate marker of BMD in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.034).

Conclusions: The association of emphysema with thoracic bone attenuation in HIV-infected individuals is consistent with previous reports in non-HIV infected smokers. These findings suggest that emphysema should be considered a potential marker of osteoporosis risk in HIV-infected individuals.

Abstract [5] Full-text [free] access  [6]

Comorbidity [8], People living with HIV [9]
Africa [10], Europe [11], Northern America [12]
Kenya [13], Netherlands [14], United States of America [15]
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